Original Meaning of automobile Terms

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Original Meaning of automobile Terms
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George_Cherry Hill NJ on Friday, March 28, 2014 - 01:37 am:

Some guys have a hang-up about correct spelling…other guys have a hang-up as to how many decimal places a number should be or how rounding should work. Me, my OC tends to peak when modernisms and ancient-isms tend to get intermingled, and then folks tend to use this new jargon to mean two things at once.

I’m not a word doctor, we already have a few of them (entymologist)…so even though I am at work 1/2 way around the world, I know a guy but 100 miles from me here who has a complete set of 1909 issue “Automobile Engineering Cyclopedia” which is a reissue of the 1902/1906 work with new stuff added.

Yes…you could learn how to build a car or how cars worked or how others had already tried to build them including details - Cyclopedia mail order from The American School of Correspondence – Chicago. This guys copies are the only real ones that I know exist, he's the iron windmill man for China...and my company foundry makes all of his castings for him and on certain days he wants to kick back and at the same time let me browse through his collections of 'stuff' which is literally falling apart.

So I looked up the magic word, and I should have known…Torpedo not there (yet) but I always use a glass twice as big as necessary…so here is also what I found from the birthing days…and not after the definitions had been polluted by decades of marketing.

Magneto – A machine in which there are no field, magnet, coils; the magnetic field of the machine being due to the action of the permanent steel magnets. Formerly referred to as Magneto – Electric Generator.

Berline Body – A limousine automobile body having more than two seats in the back part.

Convertible Body – An automobile in which may be used in two or more ways, usually as an open or a closed carriage, or in which several seats may be concealed, and raised to increase the seating capacity.

Doctor’s Cab Body – An automobile especially adapted for use of doctors, resembling a hansom cab, with entrance from the front and at the left side of front. Another type of two seated brougham with no front seat, the control and steering are enclosed.

Dry Cell – A primary voltaic cell in which a moist material is used in place of the ordinary fluid electrolyte.

Flyabout – Name of a special make of Roadster.

Half-Motion Shaft – see Half-Time Shaft

Half- Time shaft – The cam shaft of a four cycle gas engine

Landaulet Body – An automobile body resembling a limosine body, but having a cover fitted to the back which may be let down, leaving the back open. The top generally extends over the driver.

Limousine Body – An enclosed automobile body having the front and sides with side doors. The top extends over the driver.

Racing Body – A low light automobile body, having two seats with backs as low as possible; designed for large fuel capacity and very high speed.

Roadster – A small motor car designed to be fairly speedy; usually has carrying capacity for an extra quantity of fuel and supplies; generally seats two persons, with provisions for one or two more, by the attachment of a rumble seat in the rear.

Running Gear – The frame, springs, motor, wheels, speed change gears, axles, and machinery of an automobile, without the body; used synonymously with chassis.

Skimabout – The name of a particular make of a speedy roadster

Spark Regulator – A mechanism by which the time of ignition of the charge is varied by a small handle on or near the steering wheel.

Storage Battery – See Accumulator. [ Accululator – A secondary battery or storage battery. It usually consists of chemically prepared lead plates combined with an acid solution. ]

Tonneau – The rear seats of a motor car. Literally, the word means a round tank or water barrel

Tourabout – A light type of touring car
Touring Car – A car with no removable rear seats, and a carrying capacity of 4 to 7 persons.

Town Car – A car having the rear seats enclosed but the driver exposed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, March 28, 2014 - 02:12 am:

Neat! Thank you George!
I found "rumble seat" in there!
Thanks again.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Friday, March 28, 2014 - 10:15 am:

one old timer told me there is no such thing as a 4 door sedan because a 2 door is a sedan, and a 4 door is a coach !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, March 28, 2014 - 10:42 am:


Sedan.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Friday, March 28, 2014 - 10:45 am:

I think I like SKIMABOUT the best.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Friday, March 28, 2014 - 10:48 am:

I'm confused by the commas in the Magneto definition. I would think it would read "A machine in which there are no field magnet coils" meaning the magnetic field is not an "Electro magnetic" field, but a permanent magnet field. It does go on to say that the magnets are permanent magnets, but the commas make it look like it has no field, no magnets, and no coils. Kinda confusing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave DeYoung ......... Stoughton, WI on Friday, March 28, 2014 - 10:56 am:

I once did a wedding and my passengers were the 95 year-old great grand parents of the groom. Her first comment once she was seat referred to the fact that my sedan had a weather front on it. It took me a minute to realize that she was talking about the windshield.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Friday, March 28, 2014 - 11:30 am:

Ambulance was a hospital that would accept ambulatory patients.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Friday, March 28, 2014 - 11:44 am:

A "Foot-feed" is the adapter installed on old cars so one could control the throttle with the foot instead of the lever.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Friday, March 28, 2014 - 11:46 am:

In addition to the automobile terms listed (as well as some not listed) is the fact that there is a vocabulary devoted entirely to the repair side of things. My wife, for example, understands after 40 years that, "This will only take a minute" actually means it's a 2 to 3 day job. "No problem, I can fix this myself" is also a phrase that requires the code book.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Friday, March 28, 2014 - 01:59 pm:

And one most often misused here: Restored vs. Rebuilt. But that one is very close to a tie with Original vs. Parts Car. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George_Cherry Hill NJ on Friday, March 28, 2014 - 02:14 pm:

Hal, I typed it verbatim...commas and all.

Like I said, I'm not a word doctor and in fact when it came time for grad school...my GMAT's said I was only in the 39th percentile in grammar and composition. Only later did it dawn on me that was still 39% of college graduates :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rion Schulze on Friday, March 28, 2014 - 05:10 pm:

I Like this list of tool definitions too.

REALISTIC TOOL DEFINITIONS

1. DRILL PRESS: A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat metal bar stock out of your hands so that it smacks you in the chest and flings your pop across the room, splattering it against that freshly painted part you were drying.

2. WIRE WHEEL: Cleans paint off bolts and then throws them somewhere under the workbench with the speed of light. Also removes fingerprint whorls and hard-earned guitar calluses in about the time it takes you to say, "SH**!!!"

3. ELECTRIC HAND DRILL: Normally used for spinning pop rivets in their holes until you die of old age.

4. PLIERS: Used to round off hexagonal bolt heads.

5. HACKSAW: One of a family of cutting tools built on the Ouija board principle: It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course, the more dismal your future becomes.

6. VISE GRIP PLIERS: Used to round off bolt heads. If nothing else is available, they can also be used to transfer intense welding heat to the palm of your hand.

7. OXYACETYLENE TORCH: Used almost entirely for setting various flammable objects in your shop on fire. Also handy for igniting the grease inside a wheel hub you're trying to get the bearing race out of.

8. WHITWORTH SOCKETS: Once used for working on older British cars and motorcycles, they are now used mainly for impersonating that 9/16 or 1/2 socket you've been searching for the last 15 minutes.

9. HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK: Used for lowering an automobile to the ground after you have installed your new disk brake pads, trapping the jack handle firmly under the bumper.

10. EIGHT-FOOT LONG DOUGLAS FIR 4X4: Used to attempt to lever an automobile upward off a hydraulic jack handle.

11. TWEEZERS: A tool for removing splinters of wood, especially Douglas fir.

12. TELEPHONE: Tool for calling your neighbor to see if he has another hydraulic floor jack.

13. SNAP-ON GASKET SCRAPER: Theoretically useful as a sandwich tool for spreading mayonnaise; used mainly for removing dog feces from your boots.

14. E-Z OUT BOLT AND STUD EXTRACTOR: A tool that snaps off in bolt holes and is ten times harder than any known drill bit.

15. TWO-TON HYDRAULIC ENGINE HOIST: A handy tool for testing the tensile strength of bolts and fuel lines you forgot to disconnect.

16. CRAFTSMAN 1/2 x 16-INCH SCREWDRIVER: A large motor mount prying tool that inexplicably has an accurately machined screwdriver tip on the end without the handle.

17. AVIATION METAL SNIPS: See hacksaw.

18. TROUBLE LIGHT: The home builder's own tanning booth. Sometimes called a drop light, it is a good source of vitamin D, "the sunshine vitamin", which is not otherwise found under cars at night. Health benefits aside, its main purpose is to consume 40-watt light bulbs at about the same rate that 105-mm howitzer shells might be used during, say, the first few hours of the Battle of the Bulge. More often dark than light, its name is somewhat misleading.

19. PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER: Normally used to stab the lids of old-style paper-and-tin oil cans and squirt oil on your shirt; can also be used, as the name implies, to round off the interiors of Phillips screw heads.

20. AIR COMPRESSOR: A machine that takes energy produced in a coal-burning power plant 200 miles away and transforms it into compressed air that travels by hose to a Pneumatic impact wrench that grips rusty bolts last tightened 70 years ago by someone at Ford, and rounds them off.

21. PRY BAR: A tool used to crumple the metal surrounding that clip or bracket you needed to remove in order to replace a 50 cent part.

22. HOSE CUTTER: A tool used to cut hoses 1/2 inch too short.

23. HAMMER: Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer now-a-days is used as a kind of divining rod to locate expensive parts not far from the object we are trying to hit.

24. MECHANIC'S KNIFE: Used to open and slice through the contents of cardboard cartons delivered to your front door; works particularly well on boxes containing upholstered items, chrome-plated metal, and plastic parts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jamie Holmes on Friday, March 28, 2014 - 07:43 pm:

Rion,

Thanks, I needed that !!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd on Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 10:52 am:

"one old timer told me there is no such thing as a 4 door sedan because a 2 door is a sedan, and a 4 door is a coach !"

Interesting, my Dad told me that a 2 door was a coach and a 4 door was a sedan. I guess it depends on what part of the which country you're from.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 11:27 am:

you could be right ken, quite possible my memory has failed me again!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 11:30 am:

Rion, those words of wisdom gave me some good laughs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rion Schulze on Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 06:51 pm:

Thanks, I have laughed out loud a couple of times reading these. Laughter is good for the soul.:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 08:12 pm:

Rion - Best laugh of the year so far! Thanks.


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