It should be 100 Years old now.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: It should be 100 Years old now.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Stewart -Calif. on Friday, March 28, 2014 - 10:42 pm:

I thought My 1914 T Runabout turned 100 Years old on December 16, 2013. But was told the engine serial number was not the car manufacture date. The latest date on it is stamped in the wood under the seat. SOOO It should be 100 Years old now. Went for a ride today, My T runs better than I do.
These are the numbers on my 1914 T Run About.
Engine # 395707 12/16/1913
Firewall Plaque # 371928 11/13/1913
Engine Cast date 11/22/13
(50 years to the day before President Kennedy was assassinated.)
Stamped on wood under seat #131351...3 M 14
Kick Plate has stamped into it M B
The documentation of owners with the T is:
Mr. Templin Marlin Washington 1914 - 1930 (1863-1941)
Mr. Birge Odessa Washington 1930 - 1988 (1908-2003)
Mr. Batelan (Mr. Birge's Nephew) 1988 - 2004 (1934- )
Myself 2004 -


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDonald-Federal Way, Wa. on Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 12:26 am:

Mark
I see that after 100 years she isn't garage floor trained, she still dribbles on the floor.
Ha. Happy birthday to her and many more.

Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 01:07 am:

From what I can figure my un garage floor trained 14 Touring will turn 100 on July 2nd 2014. I have already bought a 6 pack and some M&M's to celebrate!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Stewart -Calif. on Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 01:08 am:

That's right. When she stops dripping oil or water I know she is out!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 01:50 am:

A few years ago, at a car show, a school teacher happened to show up with a bunch of her kids in tow. Their ages ranged from about eight to maybe fifteen and they were fascinated by the advanced age of my street-legal horseless carriage.

The teacher asked me how long ago this Model T had been manufactured. I told her the car had been manufactured in 1915 (not quite as old as your car, but close) and explained to her kids about how the car was an antique even before I was born. And yes, one of the kids asked my age.

That began a history lesson: The teacher explained to her children about how this car was ancient long before Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, before JFK was assassinated and even before there was such a thing as Rock & Roll. She went on about how this car had been on the road before the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, before the world had heard of FDR, Winston Churchill, or Adolph Hitler; how this Model T had been built two years before the United States entered World War One; seven years before the general public had ever heard of King Tut because his tomb wasn't discovered by Howard Carter until 1922, and how, because this car was built fifty years after the end of the Civil War, its original owner could possibly have been an elderly Union or Confederate veteran who had served under Abraham Lincoln or Jefferson Davis. Her kids were impressed. Heck, so was I.

Then the teacher shot some photos of her kids sitting in the Model T with her cell phone and then asked me to show them what it was like to hand-crank the engine. I did that and as the car was idling, she pointed out to her kids how this very engine was powering this very car around in the days when a hand-crank was also standard equipment on a trendy gadget known as the telephone, which, in most cases back then, appeared as a wall-mounted wooden box decorated by a pair of brass bells—and how most American households didn't have one yet.

Typical of countless graying American males, I bought an automotive toy to assuage the depressing effects of a mid-life crisis. It was very late in life for a school teacher to finally make an impression on me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 09:01 am:

Paul,I'm sure our's is 7/3/1914! About 15 years ago i was parked at the Sloan and a car parked two from me was a 7/2 or 3/1914 model T touring!!I'm sure that car was a once Stynoski winner! Bud in Wheeler.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 09:36 am:

Bob...what a great experience with that teacher and those kids. Really puts these cars into perspective, doesn't it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 10:01 am:

I think it's admirable what the teacher is doing. However Winston Churchill was a celebrity in much of the world as early as 1899, when he escaped from a Boer prison camp and eluded South Afrikkan authorities, and was celebrated as a hero by the newspapers around the world who picked up the story.

Churchill is a fascinating character. Like Henry Ford, Churchill is often made into a one dimensional character by history teachers out of necessity to keep the students focused enough to learn something as opposed to nothing. A great teacher inspires students to want to learn more outside of the rote lessons found in institutional books. Using antique cars gives them a chance to expand their minds beyond the limits imposed on the school system.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, March 31, 2014 - 01:59 am:

Nice to know that there are still a few good teachers left in this world.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Monday, March 31, 2014 - 06:07 am:

Most folks drop off the mantle of their occupations when they punch out and believe me, I never got the urge to come up with an ad slogan after hours. But this school teacher was plugged in and switched on with her pilot light burning (though I suppose having a bunch of kids in tow might help keep that mechanism engaged).

In any case, she had the data at her fingertips and she had that certain kind of magic that arrests attention and her kids (along with a bunch of car-show spectators) were listening with ears and eyes wide open as she gave her little talk. And I have to admit that though I had bought a brass car simply because I always wanted one and had reached bucket-list age, I drove home feeling more like the custodian of a precious relic.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house on Monday, March 31, 2014 - 05:52 pm:

My '14 runabout turned 100 last month. The engine casting date reads: 21914. I like that it was cast on the 19th of a month thereby revealing the year of manufacture "1914" I highlight the casting date in white paint on a black engine and frequently point it out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Monday, March 31, 2014 - 07:27 pm:

The Horseless Carriage Club of America has this neat program, whereby you can receive a "Century-Old" badge for your car in exchange for four bucks, a couple of photos of your car and a written description.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Klem on Monday, March 31, 2014 - 10:11 pm:

My daughter is a 5th grade teacher who also is a car spotter and an advocate of modern teaching methods. "OUR" future is in the hands of these under-paid educators who are shaping the world for the future. Think of this when you go to the polls and there are school bond issues on the ballot. Better teachers will make a better world!


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