Ford 'TT" Rail Truck

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Ford 'TT" Rail Truck
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Chantrell - Adelaide, Australia on Tuesday, April 01, 2014 - 05:43 pm:



"Ford truck converted for rail operation."
DESCRIPTION: A Ford truck which has been converted for operation on the railways about to be delivered by horse drawn cart from the premises of Forwood Down & Co. Ltd. engineering firm in Hindley Street, Adelaide. This is a Ford Model TT truck chassis which appears to be a ca.1923/24 model, but not as late as the last of the T and TT which were built in 1927. (information provided by researcher)
DATE ca.1930
Photo courtesy of the State Library of South Australia BRG 201/13/2/30.

Note: above is the library's description, not mine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Richard Bennett on Tuesday, April 01, 2014 - 06:08 pm:

Certainly not an express waggon, given the small back wheels on an already slow TT chassis.Perhaps to be used as a shunter in yards.

Allan from down under


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dane Hawley Near Melbourne Australia on Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - 06:26 am:

David, IIRC I found another photo of this vehicle in use , and I think it might have been a a timber merchant's yard. Unfortunately I can't re-locate the picture now, but believe that I posted it on the Forum a couple of years ago.

Dane.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - 08:44 am:

Standard rail gauge here is 4' 8.5", adopted nationally during the Civil War to facilitate movement of troops and supplies. Has that been used internationally, or does each region of the world use a different width?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - 08:49 am:

Get those horses up and galloping, and I'll bet that's the fastest speed that TT ever saw!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - 09:32 am:

Steve, sixty percent of the world's railways use 4' 8.5" or 1435mm standard gauge including most of Europe.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Track_gauge#Dominant_gauges


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Miller, Sequim WA on Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - 12:21 pm:

I learned years back that the rail standard we have here likely can be dated back to the Romans in that they used this measurement for their wagons and chariots and the design of their roads.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - 01:44 pm:

I've heard/read that too, Fred. I also read that the measurement was based on a wagon/chariot being pulled by two horses, meaning our entire RR standard is based on horses butts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Chantrell - Adelaide, Australia on Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - 04:39 pm:

Australia originally had 3 different rail gauges. News South Wales and South Australia had the standard 4 8 gauge. Queensland opted for a narrow gauge of 3' 6", as did Tasmania and Western Australia. Victoria opted for the broad gauge of 5' 3".

Our early rail movements is strewn with train changes at borders, passengers moving from one train to another, even changing locomotives on the same gauge (Vic/SA for example) border because each wanted their own rolling stock although the same gauge was used. This is one reason why we Federated all the states in 1901.

I am not a rail buff and I hope we have an Australian forum contributor that can shed some light on this fascinating but confusing part of Australia's history. In 1910 we the government passed legislation for the standard 4 8 gauge, but it was not until about 2004 that every railway line in Australia had been replaced.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - 04:53 pm:

David, probably nothing to it but I was told years ago that the reason Australia used a variety of rail gauges was to put obstacles in the way of an invading army. Seems far fetched but who knows? Regards, Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dane Hawley Near Melbourne Australia on Thursday, April 03, 2014 - 05:54 am:

I wrote this for another Forum a while ago. That might explain the Australian situation.

http://www.oldclassiccar.co.uk/forum/phpbb/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=14260

Around the world there have been many many different railway gauges. Standard gauge of 4'8" was the gauge used in pre- steam days in England and adopted for the steam railways, however even there other gauges were used, like the 7' of the Great Western Railway, later converted to standard. In Europe one meter railways were built.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dane Hawley Near Melbourne Australia on Thursday, April 03, 2014 - 06:25 am:

Here is the truck on rails, ready for work.



Caption- "Truck owned by a carrier
DESCRIPTION A carrier's truck which has been converted to operate on rails by Forwood Down ironworks of Kilkenny. This is a Ford Model TT truck chassis which appears to be a ca.1923/24 model, but not as late as the last of the T and TT which were built in 1927. (information provided by researcher)"


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