A new clutch spring can make all the difference!

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: A new clutch spring can make all the difference!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Cameron Whitaker on Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - 12:16 am:

At the museum that I volunteer for, we have a speedster that we call the Blue Racer. Long story short, it never liked to get into high gear. The stock clutch would always slip, and never liked to stay engaged. I had to adjust everything since every single adjustment was far off. Even when it was all adjusted properly, I still could hardly get the clutch to engage right.

Finally, I came to the conclusion that the clutch spring may be weak, though I had no real proof. I decided to through a new one at it in the hopes that it would help. After an entire day of work involving removing the old clutch spring and installing the new one, all I can say is what a difference! Now the clutch actually engages as it should, and the car is perfectly drivable in high gear!

It still sticks extremely badly when it's cold, despite the fact that it's a brand new clutch pack, but at least it doesn't slip in high gear anymore. Unfortunately, no amount of adjustment in the world was able to make it stop sticking when it's cold. I suspect that the "new" clutch pack that they installed actually consisted of a heavily used one. Still, the new clutch spring was a night-and-day improvement over the old one!

Now it's time for a few pictures. And don't worry. I made sure that not a single grain of sand got into the engine. Thank goodness for a generous supply of shop rags!

clutchspring1

clutchspring2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthonie Boer on Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - 02:22 am:

Cameron : there is a difference in height, but what is the difference in pressure @ two inches ?
Thanks Toon


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - 07:40 am:

Good question Toon but I suspect the new one is installed. I understand the minimum to be around 90 pounds at two inches. It would be interesting to know the test of the old one that is known to slip. How far from 90 is it?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - 08:06 am:

I have checked old ones that were as low as 70 and evidently still holding, I would not re use them though. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - 05:45 pm:

it's always gratifying when fixing something makes it work better. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - 07:44 pm:

On my model T I sometimes have to take my toe and hook the clutch pedal and pull it back to get it to go in high gear.
Do I need a new clutch spring?
If so can they be put in with the hogs head off like in the above photo?

Thanks

Herb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - 08:00 pm:

I THINK you need to either pull the engine out or pull the rear end/drive shaft/radius rod assembly back in order to replace the clutch spring because you must remove the "4th main" to do it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - 08:28 pm:

Herb

Your problem could either be the low speed band is adjusted too loose, or the 'free neutral' adj. made at the clevis and rod at the lower end of the low speed pedal isn't satisfactory. The low pedal is sticking with a bit of 'over center' movement of the linkage to the clutch lever.

Note the third paragraph on the left column of this instruction.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Glen Chaffin on Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - 09:03 pm:

The good Ford springs we measured, measured 90-100 lbs. We made our new springs 110 lbs. That made a lot of people happy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - 09:59 pm:

Cameron

"Unfortunately, no amount of adjustment in the world was able to make it stop sticking when it's cold."

What weight oil are you using?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Cameron Whitaker on Thursday, April 03, 2014 - 02:28 pm:

Bud,

We're running straight 30 weight. The museum has a large quantity of it, so that's what we use for all the Ts. This car just seems to stick more than all the others. Some of the Ts over there don't stick at all. Considering all the other problems we've found on that car, I'm pretty convinced that whoever built it just used old clutch disks, and who knows what shape they were in to begin with.

For all of you who asked, I didn't actually measure the stiffness of the old spring. However, I can say that the new spring was noticeably stiffer than the old one. With the old one, I could just about compress it to 2" with my hands. I figured that it was going to be getting a new spring regardless of the condition of the old one, so I just didn't see the need to do an actual measurement.


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