Tricky oil pan

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Tricky oil pan
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie on Friday, April 04, 2014 - 02:39 pm:

I have been running this oil pan in one of my cars for the last 10 years or so. It works really well, but I prefer my T's more stock. The pan is 100% rubber mounted, and once installed is fairly unobtrusive.

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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Friday, April 04, 2014 - 02:41 pm:

Cool oil pan. Are you selling it? Just sharing how cool it is? Not sure what you're going for with this post.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie on Friday, April 04, 2014 - 02:41 pm:


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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie on Friday, April 04, 2014 - 02:44 pm:

Seth, I like to show off things that I think are interesting. If I find them interesting, others may too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Friday, April 04, 2014 - 02:49 pm:

Ok, I'm cool with sharing for the sake of sharing. It was just the way you said "I've been running this but prefer it more stock." made me wonder if you meant you didn't want to run it anymore. It is pretty slick though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie on Friday, April 04, 2014 - 04:01 pm:

I have replaced it with a stock pan. It was nice when it came to pulling the motor as the pan could be lowered. I wonder why Ford didn't build pans with removable ears. It would have made manufacture and installation much easier.

If I decide to sell it, I will put it on the classified section.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Friday, April 04, 2014 - 05:04 pm:

Design wise "what goes together (i.e nuts/bolts) can come apart"! Riveted hangers on the crankcase are much more permanent.

My best guess that Henry wanted the T to withstand the roads or lack thereof back in 1909, that can wrench and twist the ordinary auto apart.

Ford 3 point suspension, front and rear, going to the fixed crankcase. Firmly as possible to the frame, a bit of wood in places for spacers and to absorb road whacks and twists to the frame.

That crankcase is the 'headstone' of the T, like the famous Roman arch, the crankcase is the center. It takes all the forces of takeoff, acceleration push load from the rear wheels, as well as the tugging load of the rear wheel on stopping with the trans brake or emergency brake.

Quite a feat for a stamping out of steel IMO :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie on Friday, April 04, 2014 - 05:11 pm:

Dan said: "Riveted hangers on the crankcase are much more permanent."

Really? I've sure seen a bunch of originals break. I've never seen an Apco mount break.

My guess is a patent was likely the reason Ford didn't use detachable mounts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Baker on Friday, April 04, 2014 - 05:48 pm:

The rubber mounts look like vintage vw bug transmission mounts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Friday, April 04, 2014 - 06:01 pm:

Tom

Yes, the hangers fracture, for sure.

Not all, but some, the rivet braze design is still working on my T's :-)

I think the later Model A mounts with rubber had problems too. Different aftermarket mounts made for the Model A. Don't think many aftermarket mounts with rubber were T period accessories, but more so with the APCO style repair parts. I have some, carry one in my touring just in case for me or someone else on tour ! Ha.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Friday, April 04, 2014 - 08:42 pm:

Dan, I think you mean "keystone," not "headstone". There's a grave difference between the two...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Saturday, April 05, 2014 - 06:50 am:

I like the design. Please share more about it, Tom?
How much difference in sound and vibration compared to T's with ordinary pans? Less problems with loosened screws? (ok, none should loosen if they're properly wired & pinned)
Where did you find the rubber mounts, was it VW bug transmission mounts as suggested above?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie on Saturday, April 05, 2014 - 09:39 am:

Warwick, I don't know what the mounts are. As James suggested, perhaps they are VW tranny mounts. This pan was in my 1927 coupe that I drove to the 48 contiguous states in 2006. I would guess that I have 25,000 or so miles on this motor, with this pan. It was extremely smooth, for a T, but it is a well balanced motor so it should run fairly smoothly. Comparing it to my Montana 500 cars, I would say that it is about as smooth, but not hugely smoother than them. I used the hogshead to pan braces with springs on the pan ear bolts. Here is a little video of the car on my trip, taken in Colorado whilst barreling down the road at about 50 mph. It may give you an idea of the noise.

https://myspace.com/superttour/video/crossing-the-colorado-river-at-hite/1787366


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