Stretch T

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Stretch T
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Mitchell on Friday, April 04, 2014 - 09:43 pm:

Anybody Have an idea how many of these were manufactured? Value?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Friday, April 04, 2014 - 10:05 pm:

Looks like the rear wheel is quite close to the fender. I wonder if it rubs.

Here are a couple other stretched T's
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/118802/145277.html?1276437997

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Saturday, April 05, 2014 - 10:07 am:

I wonder if people do things like this because they become bored with their cars or they just can't get enough attention.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Saturday, April 05, 2014 - 10:25 am:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uM2FAnVvSBE


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Saturday, April 05, 2014 - 11:02 am:

The next link down in the suggested link by Jim Thode for Ed Archer's 1922 stretch limo did not work for me in thread above. But from the thread at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/331880/399342.html?1383960777 Ed posted the photo below:



and from a previous thread:



As far as value -- there are so few of them around you cannot say well the average selling prices is x,y,z. So it would depend on what someone wanted. Ts do not have a surplus of power (ok compared to many cars in the 1908-1914 or so area they did). More weight means slower acceleration, longer stops, etc. And one of the things I like best about the T is how it is very easy to maneuver -- the longer version will most likely have a longer turning radius etc. (I.e. the extended cab long wheel base truck today needs a more room to turn than the short wheel base version of the reg cab.) Also be sure it will fit in your storage area (and putting the wife's car out in the rain may or may not be an option for you -- but at our house -- that space is hers.

If the engine has an overhead valve set up to add power for the extra weight of the limo that would add to the value of the car. The same for aux transmission etc. Or if it had a history of actually being a sight seeing car early in its life to some of us that would be considered a plus.

From your profile it looks like this is your 4th posting. If you are new to Ts -- I would recommend joining one of the local clubs and riding in and checking out how the Ts perform. Or you may have lots of Ts for years and this is one of your new postings.

Favor to ask -- would you please post a higher resolution photo of the front wheel lugs? The one you posted makes it look like a bigger lug than I normally see on a Kelsey, Firestone, etc. demountable wheel. You could also just send me the photo and then you don't have to resize, crop etc. to get it to post. If you click on my name, it brings up my profile and my e-mail address is the third line down.

Thanks for posting the photo -- we do not see many of those.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Saturday, April 05, 2014 - 11:09 am:

Dave,

The ones done back in the day were to allow more paying passengers per driver / car. I believe there was an article on Ed's car -- the body was originally used as a sight seeing bus.

The ones done today -- are usually someone's dream -- and I don't see anything wrong with that either. Or as the song says, "You have to have a dream in order for your dream to come true."

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Saturday, April 05, 2014 - 01:35 pm:

Well Hap, I can see why they were done back then. Today, not so much.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Richard Bennett on Saturday, April 05, 2014 - 07:50 pm:

Hap, my eyes are used to the Kelsey loose lug types most common on our Canadian sourced cars, and the lugs shown look consistent with those.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Sunday, April 06, 2014 - 09:22 am:

Allan,

Thank you for all your many comments, photos, etc. on the wheels & rims as well as other topics. I agree with you that most of the lugs look like the standard Kelsey (which in a photo like that I could not tell from the Firestone/Cleveland style either.)

Below is a cross section of the Kelsey 88 rim and felloe. Note that the leg of the Kelsey 88 lug does not go 1/2 across the felloe but more like about 1/3 or so across the felloe.





In the photo above of the front wheel, that lug looks to me like it is longer than the standard lug. That my just be the way the lighting is. And I can play some more with adjusting the contrast etc. later. But I would guess a higher resolution photo of that area would easily clear that one up i.e. standard length lug or longer than the standard Kelsey (or Firestone/Cleveland).

Again thank you and others for taking the time to answer some of my more detailed questions (ok and sometimes dumb questions).

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Richard Bennett on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 06:44 am:

Hi Hap.

I think the light may be influencing the photo. From your cross sectional diagram, the face of the lug to which the nut fits is a little wider than the length of the foot which engages on the felloe.

From the front wheel photo, these proportions seem the same. The foot of the lug at 4 o'clock looks a little narrower than the face of the lug at 2 o'clock.

I note the cross sectional diagram of the rim shows the flat base to the rim and solid ridge which engages on the felloe. I thought all the Kelsey 88 rims were like this until I turned up one with the rolled in groove and the cutouts for the lug to engage on.

This is another reason why I back away from asserting anything is gospel about Ts.

Cheers, Allan


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