Spindle Tightness

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Spindle Tightness
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Patrick Mulrooney, Webster, NY on Saturday, April 05, 2014 - 07:10 pm:

Hi All,

I have searched the forum but cannot find a concise answer, so please forgive me if this is a redundant post. I have installed new spindle bushings, bolts, etc as well as the steel spindle arm bushings. My question is, with the spindle assembly only connected, how much resistance should there be when moving back and forth by hand? Also, should the spindle bolt spin within the brass bushings or should the bushings be spinning with the bolt?

Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Richard Bennett on Saturday, April 05, 2014 - 07:29 pm:

Patrick, the bushings are captive in the spindle and the king pins are captive in the axle. Neither should be able to move.
Resistance to turning the spindle should be minimal. A little is better than having them flop around under their own weight.

Hope this helps.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Saturday, April 05, 2014 - 07:37 pm:

The faces top and bottom of the axle should be smooth and perpendicular to the spindle. There is a special tool for reaming the bushings and cutting the flat surfaces at the same time. The two bushings should also be reamed in alignment with each other so that the bolt will fit inside without binding but no noticeable side play. The flat surfaces should be perpendicular to the bolt. The flat surfaces should be finished just loose enough to slip between the surfaces on the axle ends. After all the above and oil on all mating surfaces the bolt should be tightened to just the point that it begins to bind and then backed off slightly so that the spindle moves freely. Then the jamb nut on the bottom should be tightened and cotter pin installed. Note, sometimes when the jamb nut is tightened it will also tighten up the bolt. If it binds, loosen slightly to where it moves freely. When you are done, and the wheels are on, the car should run in a straight line and not pull one way or the other.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Saturday, April 05, 2014 - 08:54 pm:

Patrick,

The spindle bolt, (kingpin), should NOT turn when the spindle turns.

As Allan says, the spindle should turn with minimal resistance.

Do not tighten the kingpin such that it causes the end of the axle yoke to "clamp" down on the spindle bushings. Snug the kingpin down, if it begins to cause drag on the spindle rotation, back off a bit and tighten the castle nut, then cotter pin it in place.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Saturday, April 05, 2014 - 09:20 pm:

Patrick, you have to kinda feel it while you are tightening the spindle bolt. What I mean is, when you start tightening the spindle bolt nut, it's going to change the tightness, AND, you have to line up the cotterpin hole too. So, it's all relative, plus you want to be able to turn the spindle with the least amount of resistance. Make sure your threads on the lower yoke of your axle are in good shape, and the spindle bolt goes into those threads correctly. What I mean here is, the upper portion of the yoke is a pilot (guide), to center the spindle bolt into the lower yoke. Many poorly made reproductions are not made correctly, and the threads will go up into the pilot area which isn't correct. I believe your car is a '16, and I don't know if you have the original man hole spindle bolts, but in not, pay attention to what you are doing. My advice is find a machine shop with a Sunnen hone, or at least use a piloted reamer, so you get the upper and lower bushings properly aligned.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Patrick Mulrooney, Webster, NY on Sunday, April 06, 2014 - 09:27 am:

Thank you everybody. Your answers make it quite clear to me now! After some other chores which need attending to, I plan on having another go at it. With any luck, I may get to take her for a test ride later today.

Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Cary Abate on Sunday, April 06, 2014 - 10:51 am:

To All,

I read this forum daily and daily I get at least one good lesson for my T's. To the experts who pass on this valuable info, Thanks.

Cary


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Patrick Mulrooney, Webster, NY on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 09:46 am:

Mission accomplished! Thanks to All the advice, and a great deal of help from a couple of friends we were able to take the car on a few hot laps yesterday. She ran strong and the steering was significantly improved.

As always, my sincere thanks to all...

Patrick


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