My 1920 tool kit!

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: My 1920 tool kit!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Kuhn on Sunday, April 06, 2014 - 11:11 am:

Here is my tool kit,hopefully the right ones for a 1920 April Roadster.Any help or comments please!Hope you like the screwdriver as I dont have period one yet.I black oxide the tools here ay home with the Caswell black oxide kit,just mix it with distilled water and you are ready to go.I have done lots of parts for my 5 1920s Indian Chiefs,it works great and easy to use.Hope you like!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Sunday, April 06, 2014 - 11:24 am:

That is one nice kit! I like it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Sunday, April 06, 2014 - 12:36 pm:

Very nice!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Sunday, April 06, 2014 - 01:03 pm:

It's nice to have such things as tool kits to display at car-shows. I'm always looking for period props to use when photographing spectators with the car and afterward, I have them sign my guestbook with a vintage fountain pen.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Sunday, April 06, 2014 - 01:16 pm:

I'd love to put together a tool kit for my 1923. What's the best source of information for tools? Seems like every wrench I find is different, and every pair of pliers has been abused almost beyond recognition.

That's a sharp looking setup you've got there. Do you display it at shows too, or is it more of a shelf piece for the garage?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Kuhn on Sunday, April 06, 2014 - 01:24 pm:

Thanks for the kind replies!I will keep them in the wooden tool compartment under the 1920 roadster seat,but display them when the car is out so everyone can see what was included with the car as they are beautiful when redone!You really have to see in person the nice finish of the new black oxide on the wrenches.I did it last night in about a half hour,no fuss or muss.Very easy and inexpensive.Oiled up with WD 40 afterwards and let them soak overnight.Wiped them off this morning and took the pictures!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Sunday, April 06, 2014 - 01:25 pm:

Thomas, looks great.

Did you re-plate the oil can? Or just shine it up?

Anyone know if the pump had a spring like that under the handle or is that a later addition?

What was the original finish for these tools? They look good with this oxide treatment.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Kuhn on Sunday, April 06, 2014 - 02:28 pm:

Thanks Erich.The oil can was black,oily and very dingy when I bought it.I degreased it and shined it up with Mothers mag and aluminum metal polish,came out like new!It seems most these tools had the original finish somewhat when I bought them,tried to find nice correct originals.they all had some black oxide finish left on them.So I fixed up any dings or marks to have them look like new,wire wheeled them to smooth everything out,glass beaded them and left them clean and oil free for the black oxide finish to be put on by submersing in the solution for 3 minutes,then rinse off with warm water,and immediately spray up with WD 40 and let them soak overnight.You would think they were just made!Caswell Plating sells the solution,1 quart solution mixed with 2 gallons distilled water.You can plate any tools or hardware that is not painted.Looks exactly as original parts that I have,cant tell what is OEM or newly plated!
The air pump has T-1434 on the bottom and a steel tube.It is 21" overall height,18 1/4" from base to top of tube cap.This is how it was assembled when I got it.It works great.Hope it is correct for my 1920.Ford script on base on both sides,3/8"plunger rod.All parts seemed to be original on it.Any additional info on tire pumps greatly appreciated for sure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Kuhn on Sunday, April 06, 2014 - 06:09 pm:

Can anyone answer if this tire pump is correct for a 1920-or is it later issue?Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Sunday, April 06, 2014 - 06:12 pm:

Would love to see a time-line of what pump was included for what year.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Sunday, April 06, 2014 - 06:44 pm:

From the online Encyclopedia:

TIRE PUMP
T-1368 is the Ford design tire pump. On February 21, 1920 the drawing indicates a redesign by showing a single-cylinder instead of the double-cylinder pump. The dates of the actual change, and the variations in design over the years are not indicated.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Richard Bennett on Sunday, April 06, 2014 - 07:27 pm:

Thomas's kit shows the spark plug wrench with the closed socket on the other end. Can anyone tell me, with some authority, when this changed to the open end like a single hex ring spanner.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Sunday, April 06, 2014 - 08:02 pm:

Additionally, can someone give an estimated value of the spark plug/head bolt wrench? We stopped at a junque place yesterday. The guy had 8-10 Ford spark plug/head bolt wrenches of various designs. Some were T, Some were probably A. A couple were probably V-8. One guy was asking what he wanted for them. He said he didn't know what they were worth. I said probably $3 a piece. He was offended and said he thought they were worth more like $25 a piece. Needless to say, he is still the owner of those fine tools. I'm curious. Was my estimate out of line? I really didn't think so.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Sunday, April 06, 2014 - 08:30 pm:

I gave a 5 gallon bucket of them away ! Both early & late T, A & V8 - dragged them to swap meets for years at $1 your choice !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, April 06, 2014 - 10:56 pm:

Hal, you're right. The #2335 wrench is very common, and I wouldn't (don't) pay more than $3 for one. It's worth $25 in Fantasyland.


The top two wrenches here are #2335, for spark plugs and head bolts. The closed-end one on top was used from 1915 to about 1920 or 1921. The second one, open end, until the end of production. The third wrench is TT-5893, for Ford trucks. The fourth is a V-8 wrench.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 07:15 am:

Thomas, the tools look great. That reminds me, I have the same tools and a parkerizing kit from my gunsmithing days. I think I need to copy your idea.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 10:52 am:

Your screwdriver is a later design.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 01:10 pm:

#1902 is a mighty scarce item. That wood handle doesn't have the survival rate of the all-steel tools. Today there are probably several dozen 1907 or 2335 wrenches for every screwdriver that's still with us. That's not only because of the high attrition rate, but also because there were fewer to begin with. In the early twenties Ford quit supplying the separate screwdriver and started issuing those pliers with the screwdriver handle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 08:56 pm:

The reason there aren't any screwdrivers around, is that when the owners of the cars sold them, they kept the screwdrivers to use around the house. The one in the toolkit above looks like a current Snap-on. BTW, the early tool kits still had the screwdriver end on the pliers, even with the screwdriver.


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