Lifting an engine onto a trailer

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Lifting an engine onto a trailer
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Marshall on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 02:19 am:

Does anyone have a tip for lifting an engine onto my trailer without assistance. I have to collect the last bits for my two T's with no assistance this Friday. Another 1150 kilometre trip in a day but.... you have to do these things aye?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare - Just a little South West . on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 02:25 am:

I would try getting the heavy end on first ( the flywheel end ) then use the nose to position it within the trailer.
The engine its self is not heavy, although l wouldn't try to lift it by myself !!!!
a small trolley jack and some wood blocks will lift it up high enough to clear the back of the trailer.
I wish you luck mate.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nevin Gough on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 04:53 am:

Use some heavy planks as a ramp and winch it up from the front of the trailer...being careful to protect the sump plug etc.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 06:18 am:

David,

I have used this Harbor Freight hand truck on
occasion along with moving blankets ..... :-)

@ http://www.harborfreight.com/extra-wide-hand-truck-66171.html



Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 07:41 am:

David look for my post in this thread
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/423378.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 08:09 am:

I've taken an engine lift and dolly with me on several occasions to auctions and auction pickups. You have to be pretty stout to dolly an engine or equipment up trailer ramps. (Which I'm not.) If the ground is soft, I just raise the load with the lift and back the trailer under it. If the area is paved or concrete, just roll the load to the back of the trailer. Once it's on the trailer, it can be dollied to the front of the trailer. Or it it's too heavy (equipment), I've moved the lift onto the trailer bed and used that to roll the load to the front. Once it's home, I have all sorts of ways to get it off the trailer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 08:16 am:

I forgot to mention; Take some boards to lay across the legs of the lift. If you have to move the load very far, rest it on the boards. Do NOT try to move the load while suspended with the lift.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 09:36 am:

I agree with the guys - Unless your Hulk Hogan or someone like that forget trying to lift it alone.

When they delivered my spare T motor the guy brought his motor lift to help get the motor out of his truck.
He had the motor on an old tire in the truck to support it.
I had a motor stand made from 2x4s with castors that simulated a model T frame with the front cross member dropped, so he just dropped it into my stand and I rolled it into the garage.

Remember leverage can be on your side.
Maybe rolling or sliding the motor onto a thin pallet and using a come-along to help slide it onto trailer would work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 09:45 am:

David, I was able to unload my rebuilt engine, on my wooden crate with my engine crane I recently got from Harbor Freight. Had to keep the lifting chain as short as possible in order to get it up enough to slide out from truck bed, but it worked nicely. Should work to load as well. Otherwise, I've borrowed the neighbors medium sized front loader, my sub-compact loader won't lift that high.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill in Adelaida Calif on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 09:57 am:

Depending on the size design of the trailer, sometimes you can unhitch the trailer, tip it back and then get the heavy item on the back edge of the trailer. Jack up the back of the trailer, re-hitch and then re-position the load. This obviously works best with a single axle trailer.
I have also dug wells into dirt to back the trailer tires into to lower the deck height.

Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Kriegel Mishawaka Indiana on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 09:57 am:

Please do not try to lift without the tools, ramps and mechanical leverage mentioned above. A back injury, strain is horrible !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 10:26 am:

I couldn't find a photo real quick but I have the handiest thing on my big trailer, a lift arm. It just clamps to the rails on the side of the trailer so I can move it to any place on either side of the trailer. The arm swings out over the edge and has a little winch on it, I can pick an engine in a couple minutes with it, swing it back over the trailer and set it down. If you don't have time to build something like that, here's the easy answer. Go to Harbor Freight or someplace like that, but one of those engine hoists on wheels for a buck and a half, It will come in a big box. When you get to where the engine is, put the hoist together on your trailer. Pick up the engine, you can roll the hoist wherever you want to set the engine down, set it down, either strap the hoist down on the trailer or take it apart and throw it in the pickup box. You're going to need an engine hoist in your shop anyway if you're going to work on an engine. It's a lot cheaper than chiropractor visits and back surgery.

I also have a hoist that fits in the receiver hitch of my pickup. Unhook the trailer, pick up whatever you want, back up to the trailer, set it down on the trailer, hook the trailer back up and drive off. It will also swing in to set it in the pickup box although that part of the design needs a little more work. I am amazed nobody builds them commercially. It just took me a few hours to build it and a $100 Super winch.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Schmidt on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 10:58 am:

http://www.amazon.com/Pickup-Truck-Hydraulic-Engine-Hoist/dp/B007AMM4KK


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Holland, Utah on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 11:31 am:

David, Here in Utah we have Rent-it Companies, that will rent any kind of contractor or yard equipment. I rented one a couple of years ago to put an A engine in a friends car, with transmission. Since then I have two Harbor Freight 3 ton models. They are great to lift a lot of stuff other than engines.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 01:27 pm:

I saw this tip in an old book & it works if your in good shape.no hoist needed I have done when I was younger .just stand the motor on the nose with the hand crank out then seat the trans end on and roll it on. they used to take motors in &out this way. I have done it it works. charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank M. Brady on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 01:28 pm:

I had good luck using two planks 2x8,x6' laid side by side at the back of a pickup truck. It was an A engine with housings and 3sp trans attached. I was able to "walk it up the planks by lift and push on the nose and tail of the assembly. this worked for me while by myself, and should be easier to do with a T engine. Lay it over on the manifold side, head up, and just be careful. Good luck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 02:01 pm:

In 1973-4 or so I bought an engine and loaded it in the trunk of my 68 Dodge Dart. I had another guy help me.
BUT when I got it home I had to unload it by myself. As I remember I sort of picked it up(one end) and rolled it out of the Dart's trunk and onto the ground,
I was younger and dumber then!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 03:21 pm:

Dave,
I have used a hand cart and tie down strap to load several T engines in my trailer. Use a couple of strong 2" x 6" or larger boards for ramps.

Also, we are plan on attending the REO Homecoming 2014 in Lansing, Michigan. Have never been to the Ford or REO Museum....those are on my bucket list.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 05:46 pm:

But Steve (Schmidt), the product information says it weighs 92 pounds; about one fourth of a engine/trans assy; about one half of a short block; and about the same as a bare block! Who's going to lift this and hold it steady to install in the receiver hitch? Hmm.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd on Monday, April 07, 2014 - 09:46 pm:

Disassemble it first, then attach one piece at a time.


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