Wards Riverside date code.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Wards Riverside date code.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Tuesday, April 08, 2014 - 10:43 am:

Does anyone here know how to decipher the date code on old WR tires? I did a search but couldn't find the answer. I assume this is the date code in the pic. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Tuesday, April 08, 2014 - 03:08 pm:

The 41 week of some year ending in 8. It can't be newer than 1998.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Tuesday, April 08, 2014 - 03:25 pm:

That's it eh? I wish I knew the year. I'm thinking 1958 or 1968. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Tuesday, April 08, 2014 - 11:03 pm:

Perhaps 1988. I don't think dates were required by DOT until the 80s. Some companies added their own code after the WWY format to distinguish between the 80s and 90s. The thought was that NO tire over 10 years old should be used on the road anyway. The date was changed to WWYY in 2000 to include the decade of the year. So any tire with a three digit year would be made in the 80s or 90s.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Wednesday, April 09, 2014 - 12:34 am:

I think your choices are 1948, 1958 or 1968 which also depends on when the DOT code became a requirement.

I believe production of 30x3.5 Ward's Riverside tires had already ceased by 1978.

Production resumed around 2007.

Riverside tire my dad purchased new in 1950.
1

Here's the code on the above tire - it ends in 9 but who knows if the DOT had adopted the code after the war. If it is a DOT code, then it would be 1949 which falls in line with my dad purchasing the tire in 1950.
3

1930s or earlier Ward's Riverside tire. The Ward's Riverside name was been ground off because it is a factory second or "blem" due defective bead. No code. My dad purchased around 1949/1950.
2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Wednesday, April 09, 2014 - 06:35 am:

Thanks so much. I'm just trying to learn more about my car's history. I know it has coils dated 1962 so I figure the tires could be 1958 or even 1968.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Wednesday, April 09, 2014 - 06:50 am:

DOT date codes came about after 1968, so the date is likely 1978. I don't think Monkey Wards sold tires by 1988.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Wednesday, April 09, 2014 - 02:51 pm:

I tried to find out exactly when the DOT mandated the date code but had no luck. Likewise when Ward Riverside tires were originally discontinued.

Royce:

Slight tangent -

Your father gave these wheels a quick black lacquer paint job over the original paint in 1950. My dad didn't do much of a prep job before hand. He had them on the '17 touring many years until he restored and re-installed the original non-demountable wheels.

Also note - the two tires on the right, a 1920s Trailblazer Cord and a 1920s/1930s Goodyear, are true 30 inch diameter tires, not oversize like the Riversides and other tires being produced today. It would be nice if true 30 inch 30 x 3.5 tires were being produced today.

1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Wednesday, April 09, 2014 - 04:03 pm:

That tiny picture with the numbers looks like a serial number or product code not a date code. I have a similar number format on my Allstate tires from the 60s that pre-date DOT requirements. If it's a DOT date code, it will be proceeded by "DOT". Anything else is just a number by the manufacturer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Wednesday, April 09, 2014 - 06:13 pm:

Makes sense.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 04:05 pm:

Just as a follow up on the date codes I did some quick research and found that tire labeling falls under the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has a legislative mandate under Title 49 of the United States Code, Chapter 301, Motor Vehicle Safety, to issue Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) and Regulations to which manufacturers of motor vehicle and equipment items must conform and certify compliance. The first standard enacted was 1967 when seat belts became required. Safety standards for tires didn't come until 1968 with only some labeling requirements. Two more were added in 1971 and 1975 to Standardized labeling for size, load and other items "necessary for proper selection and use". The requirement to identify the manufacturer of the tire didn't come until 1980 under the UNIFORM TIRE QUALITY GRADING STANDARDS. I suspect this included the first date code in the format WWY. The date code was changed to WWYY in 2000.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Friday, April 11, 2014 - 07:52 am:

Erik,

Dad says the warranty period on the paint work is expired.


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