Stopping oil leaks (?)

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Stopping oil leaks (?)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Robb on Tuesday, April 08, 2014 - 11:27 pm:

Okay, My 1919 has engine oil leaks, and I'm just running it too much to take the time to tear it down and re-gasket and seal the entire engine, transmission, etc. as I know I should.
As a stop-gap measure, I fit a solid rubber plug to the crankcase vent/filler with a 5/16" vacuum hose running up to the manifold.
My thought is that the slight vacuum being pulled on the crankcase may stop or at least reduce the oil leaks.
Am I goofy, or will this work?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kerry van Ekeren (Australia) on Tuesday, April 08, 2014 - 11:56 pm:

I don't think it's of much use, no crankcase pressure unless your pistons and rings have a real problem, remember the block is open on the tappet cover and between 3&4 Cyl's as well, if you did try, the system would need a PCValve so you would still have full vacuum to operate the carbi when starting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Wednesday, April 09, 2014 - 12:07 am:

Interesting idea but the system is open to atmosphere in a number of places and oil leaks in a T are usually from oil laying in one spot or being tossed at areas that aren't sealed well. Besides that you'll probably just carbon up your combustion chambers & valves a lot quicker with that set-up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, April 09, 2014 - 05:42 am:

A 1919 engine has two valve covers, so there isn't necessarily a leak into the crankcase between the cylinders. Ralph Ricks uses a pcv valve with a hose running first to the ohv valvetrain, then to the intake on his frontenac equipped brass pickup and I think it may reduce leaks, at least some of it, depending on where it leaks. Less reduction where moving parts splashes oil directly, more reduction where oil tends to seep through like the front crank seal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Wednesday, April 09, 2014 - 07:06 am:

Bob,

How much of a leak are we talking about? Does it leak all the time or only when running? Does it stop leaking after it sits, parked, for a while?
My car, for instance, leaks at a rate of maybe three or four tablespoons per hour when the engine is running and that's probably about average.

True, engines that were treated to super-duper-deluxe overhauls by guys like Tim Foye's Gen3 and Ron's Machine Shop may not leak at all for a matter of years, but I'd bet those are the exception.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Wednesday, April 09, 2014 - 09:18 am:

Model T's , Harley Davidsons, and Navy A-7's don't leak they just mark a path so they can find their way home!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Wednesday, April 09, 2014 - 10:57 am:

There are three places where it is hard to stop leaks. One is around the pedals, one is the front crankcase seal, and the third is around the universal joint. The only one of these places where there was a factory seal was the front crankshaft. That seal was felt. Going uphill and downhill will increase the possibility of the leakage at front or back. A filter screen in the top of the transmission will increase the likelyhood of leakage around the universal joint as will also a worn 4th main.

There have been previous posts on how to stop or at least minimize those leaks. All are non-stock modifications.

I just put drip pans under mine when parked and from time to time clean the garage floor.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, April 09, 2014 - 12:32 pm:

Re 4th main seal; I put one of the short type screens from the T era in mine. It traps the fiber from the bands and has helped cut back the leaking out the 4th.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Wednesday, April 09, 2014 - 12:51 pm:

It has been said many times before -
A leaking T is just marking it's territory!

My 19 leaked at the hogshead, motor, and pan junction on both sides.
I finally sprayed the area with engine cleaner and used black silicon on the joints.
It stopped those leaks but now the other locations are noticeable.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Wednesday, April 09, 2014 - 02:49 pm:

I tore my engine '19 engine apart and did everything possible to seal it. It worked pretty well for a while but, as expected, the leaks came back. I now accept that it's just the way it is. I plug the largest leaks that I see and check my oil level often.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthonie Boer on Wednesday, April 09, 2014 - 03:57 pm:

For the crankshaft , I have good results with a glued on oil seal.
Toon
1392R
1393R
1394R


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Wednesday, April 09, 2014 - 04:37 pm:

Mark G., can you post a picture of your screen? I've never seen one and I'd like to know what to look for. Many thanks, Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, April 09, 2014 - 05:34 pm:

I put them on Photobucket;
http://s1101.photobucket.com/user/redmodelt/library/Model%20%20T%20Ford%20vintag e%20transmission%20oil%20screen?sort=3&page=1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, April 09, 2014 - 07:13 pm:

Odd Mark, isn't there a sealing problem with an extra sheet metal thickness at only a section of the sealing surface? Do you cut an extra gasket to fill up besides the screen or does thick cork gasket material seal it all up anyway?

old oil screen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, April 09, 2014 - 07:56 pm:

I just use two full gaskets like the normal screen. Works fine. The metal is not real thick. I should have bought the other one I saw at the Portland Swap Meet last weekend. The extra holes should allow more oil to be dumped over the bands. Thanks for posting the photo. If anyone wonders about the brass wire, I have a split pin installed in the clutch shaft, it's my safety wire.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Robb on Wednesday, April 09, 2014 - 11:13 pm:

Bob Coiro,
Yes, it leaks when running and for awhile after it sits. And I guess 3 or 4 tablespoons might be an approximate amount of leakage. Guess I should just live with it??

Anthonie Boer,
I did that to the front cover about a month ago, and expected a big improvement. However, now that it's done, I don't think it was leaking there! Nothing seems to have changed.

Thanx, Guys.


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