Old Photos - A Model T, a Muddy Road and Some Incredible and Huge Early Tractors and Road Building Equipment

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Old Photos - A Model T, a Muddy Road and Some Incredible and Huge Early Tractors and Road Building Equipment
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Greenlees on Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 06:53 am:



We are right in the middle of Vermont "Mud Season" now so we thought it was a good time to show old photos of cars and travel on muddy roads. Also found were a pair of
fascinating photos and detailed enlargements showing huge early tractors and road building equipment not to be missed. See it all @ http://theoldmotor.com/?p=118256


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Greenlees on Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 01:23 pm:

Can any of you Model "T" experts date and tell us more about the Center-Door Sedan? The car behind it has been identified as an Overland.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 01:32 pm:

It does not look to me that either one of those cars are stuck, the driver is just out taking a photo of the road conditions, it looks rather dry if you look at the tracks behind the T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 01:45 pm:

The sedan is 1918. Pretty rare today.

Major clues:

kerosene lamps
non-demountable wheels
combination horn button/light switch on steering column


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 01:48 pm:

David,
I'm FAR from an expert on Centerdoor T's, but to narrow it down a little:

Centerdoor Sedans were built from late 1914 until mid-1923. The one in the photo is clearly a 1917 or later car and has an early front engine mount, which was replaced in 1921. So, given my limited knowledge, I can narrow it down to 1917-21.

I bet others here will be able to zero in a year model for you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 01:55 pm:

Also - on your blog you say the photo was taken in 1927.

The sedan has a 1919 Washington plate with a 1920 tab.

Even though the plate is not legible, the touring also has a plate with a white tab which indicates the same thing - 1920.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 01:58 pm:

It's definitely a 1918 sedan.

Another clue ruling out 1917 is the wheels are square felloe.

Photo was taken in 1920.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Greenlees on Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 02:17 pm:

Eric and Henry: Thanks for all the info about the car and the plates. The date like many with photos was incorrect.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darel J. Leipold on Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 03:41 pm:

The Big 4 traction engine was built in Minneapolis, Minnesota. There is an example existing today. There were traction engines built in "West Minneapolis" which was renamed Hopkins. Most of the local early traction engine companies were merged into the Minneapolis Moline Company of Hopkins.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Greenlees on Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 04:25 pm:

Darel; Thanks for the info - We found out quite a bit about the Big Fours while doing the post on The Old Motor,
and we included a link to a video to one of these monsters running @ http://theoldmotor.com/?p=118256


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Byrne - Racine, MN on Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 04:45 pm:

Here is a link to the current issue of Farm Collector magazine that features an article about Big Four Tractors: http://www.farmcollector.com/restoration/tractors-restoration/big-four-tractor-restoration-zmbz14marzbea.aspx#axzz2yW85YCNO
Al and Harriet Severson are good friends of mine and this project they are tackling is truly history making. With this undertaking there will be several Big Fours, some that were nothing more than just a piles of misc. parts, turned into operational tractors.
Below are a few more pictures of Big Four tractors. The firsts couple show the one owned by Steve Bauer of Hastings, MN. Maybe Darel has seen it at the Minnesota State Fair where it has been displayed several times. The other photos are a few from my files showing Big Fours building roads.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 06:44 pm:

I was just going to post that Roger Byrne has a lot of info about Big 4 tractors. Howdy, Roger!! Haven't seen you on here for awhile.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Manuel Voyages, ACT Australia on Friday, April 11, 2014 - 01:12 am:

Love those EB big 4's [and 6's] tractors.
I think there are a couple in Australia.
You dont realise how large those wheels are.

Manuel in Oz


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Byrne - Racine, MN on Friday, April 11, 2014 - 08:32 am:

Hi Stan . . . I may not post a lot, but I check the MTFCA forum everyday to see what's going on. When there is a topic that I figure I can add something to, then I'll make some comments. I hope to meet up with you again one of these days and we can talk about "old iron".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Friday, April 11, 2014 - 12:41 pm:

As Manuel Voyages said above, It's hard to realize how high those rear wheels and fenders are, especially on the rear wheels. I'd guess they're 10 to 12 feet high. Does anybody here know? Best guess?

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Friday, April 11, 2014 - 01:09 pm:

Found this information online. I don't know if it's 100% accurate, but I don't have any reason to doubt it. What a beast!

Big 4 Specs

Cost in 1912 - $2,850 Cash FOB Factory
$3,000 Financed FOB Factory
$4,000-$4,500 Delivered

Model 30
Weight: 18,000 lbs.
Piston Diameter 6 1/2 inches (6 inches on 25 hp)
Piston Stroke 8 inches
Engine RPM 650
Pulley RPM 473
Belt Pulley Diameter: 24 inches
Top Speed: 3 MPH High, 2 MPH Low
Fuel Tank Capacity: 51 Gallons
(37 Gallons with smaller optional tank)
Radiator Capacity: 81 Gallons
Towing Capacity:21,090 lbs.
Drawbar Capacity: 2,750 lbs per
small tow bar


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Fielding on Friday, April 11, 2014 - 03:34 pm:

Keith,
I believe the rears are 96" or 98"
Here is a link to Smokestack, where you can read the entire process Allan has gone through.
I have been lucky enough to have access to a Big 4 tractor and have provided parts to be used in the process.
Last time I spoke with Allan, I believe he said 11 tractors world wide will benefit from his efforts. Also, there are roughly 25 world wide on the registery.
Kinda' puts working on a Model T in a whole new light, huh?

http://www.smokstak.com/forum/showthread.php?t=81774


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Byrne - Racine, MN on Friday, April 11, 2014 - 04:16 pm:

Kevin has given you the wheel diameters, here are a few photos that will give you some perspective on the size of a Big Four. The first photo shows a young 6' tall friend of mine standing on the operators platform of Steve Bauer's tractor. The other photos will give you an idea of what it is to stand by one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Friday, April 11, 2014 - 05:52 pm:

Kevin and Roger - Thank you for the information. They are absolutely Huge!

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren W. Mortensen on Friday, April 11, 2014 - 06:28 pm:

My brothers and I were going through an old sideboard or buffet on the farm we grew up on and came across the sales booklet for the Big Four as published by the Gas Traction Engine Co. of Minneapolis, Minn. (prior to E-B taking over the concern). We read that booklet cover to cover. Never could figure out why someone in our area would consider having one of these unless they were dreaming of custom threshing for farms in the area. Way too much tractor for the local 80 - 160 acre farms in the area with small fields. My brother still has the booklet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Greenlees on Friday, April 11, 2014 - 07:42 pm:



Since so many of you are enjoying the Big Four, above is one of the other two tractors that is in a the original photo posted at the top of the thread.

It is pulling a Universal Road Finisher made by the Peoria Metal Culvert Co. that was operated by two men. This tractor and road grader appear to be finishing the center of the road
and it is following the first two machines seen below, by using the three together each grading operation was completed in one pass.

It has been identified by reader Luke Chennell as an Aultman-Taylor 30-60.

The original photos were made from huge glass plate negatives and you can also see large sectional enlargements of both photos for even more detail @ http://theoldmotor.com/?p=118256


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison_Rice Minnesota on Friday, April 11, 2014 - 09:21 pm:

Wasn't a Big Four found somewhere in one of the Dakotas that was being used almost like ric-rac to hold up a River bank. Then excavated and restored. I have a vague recollection of it. I think the story was in one of the Antique Power magazines from the '80s.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Greenlees on Saturday, April 12, 2014 - 06:23 am:



More info and original colored postcards showing Emerson-Brantingham, their tractors and other equipment can be found below at:

http://www.rockfordreminisce.com/E_-_B_Company.html


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