Polishing brass

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Polishing brass
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By michael grady on Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 11:58 am:

I have some stains on my brass radiator( from over flow of water/antifreeze) I'd like to remove. Is there a polishing attachment that goes on an electric drill you guys are aware of? I have several types of brass polish, but I'm pretty sure there is an easier way to remove these stains.

Thanks in advance!

Michael


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 12:27 pm:

This one works well I know it says aluminum but just use your favorite brass polish with it

http://www.harborfreight.com/14-piece-aluminum-polishing-kit-98707.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willie K Cordes on Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 01:04 pm:

Some fine steel wool helps along with the metal polish. Do not use a real course steel wool as it will leave scratches.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 02:42 pm:

Michael,

You didn't post any pictures, but as you can see, I have the same problem with antifreeze seeping out from under the coolant filler neck and staining and tarnishing the heck out of my brass radiator. The tarnish can get surprisingly crusty.





Equally surprising was that a few dabs of polish on a soft cloth could get rid of this crud completely. In my case, it took about five minutes worth of moderate elbow grease (and no power tools—and CERTAINLY NO STEEL-WOOL!!!) If your tarnish looks like mine, maybe this is the answer for you, too:
Get a small tub of Prism Polish (the paste, not the liquid), dab some on and rub with a soft cloth until the tarnish disappears.



Find their website here: prismpolish.com

This stuff is absolutely nothing like Brasso, Simichrome, Cape Cod, Mother's, Nevr-Dull, etc. I've tried them all and Prism Polish is in a class by itself (No, I don't hold stock in the company).

http://www.prismpolish.com/prismpolish.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQWzJFWhlKI


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Saturday, April 12, 2014 - 07:25 pm:

Checked Amazon - $11.95 and prime eligible. 5 star rating.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By patrrick mischler on Saturday, April 12, 2014 - 09:51 pm:

Use eagle chrome cleaner rence with water then use any good polish flitz or other cleaner will remove tarnish and clean use rag


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Sunday, April 13, 2014 - 09:25 am:

Bob,

Go to the nearest Home Depot or Lowes. You can get a rubber vanity sink washer for $1. It is exactly the right diameter to fit under the radiator cap. After that your radiator neck won't leak all over the pretty brass any more.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Sunday, April 13, 2014 - 10:17 am:

Vanity sink washer. Got it. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Sunday, April 13, 2014 - 10:52 am:

Yep, the neoprene washer that the suppliers sell does indeed look like a vanity sink washer:

http://www.modeltford.com/item/3927M.aspx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Sunday, April 13, 2014 - 11:07 am:

Ha! Don Lang is a smart business man. It's a vanity sink gasket....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Sunday, April 13, 2014 - 12:01 pm:

Oh. Yeah. I already have one of those. My problem is seepage where the filler neck is riveted to the radiator. I'm guessing it needs to be soldered somehow.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Monday, April 14, 2014 - 08:01 am:

Red Rouge buffing compound on a buffing wheel is how jewellers and platers polish metal to a mirror like shine. Comes in a block and is held to the revolving buffing wheel. You can read about it and purchase it from www.mcmaster.com. Type buffing compounds into the search box. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Dufault on Monday, April 14, 2014 - 08:14 am:

Bob,

If you haven't already read thru this one:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/438030.html?1397470005

when you have time, perhaps you may consider doing so. Maybe it is indeed as you suspect - a bad joint between top tank and filler neck.

Speedy recovery to you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, April 14, 2014 - 08:16 am:

Bob, since the filler neck is already held secure by the rivets, maybe some thin epoxi applied on the inside would be able to stop the leakage, at least for quite a while?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Monday, April 14, 2014 - 12:44 pm:

Dave,
Thanks for the link. I don't have a soldering iron large and hot enough to do the job and a torch might discolor the brass, so I really need to take it to a radiator shop that specializes in antique cars. There's one within 25 miles of me.

Roger,
Yeah, I was thinking of some kind of epoxy or clear silicone, but—I dunno—that kind of thing is like a temporary band-aid in place of the correct repair.

Dave and Roger,
For the moment, until I have the time to get the thing done right, the leakage is minimal and as long as I remember to wipe the water beads up with a rag when I park the car, no tarnish occurs. The answer is the Cap-A-Radiator shop.

http://www.classicradiator.com/

Thanks for responding.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R. S. Cruickshank on Monday, April 14, 2014 - 07:00 pm:

Michael, in an earlier post this week the discussion centered on who can repair the solder joint. I piped in with a comment about using a winged motor meter and the feeling I have (experience) that it causes too much vibration from wind and weight. Others did not agree with me but I know what my experience has been. I got rid of the wings for a dog bone. No problems


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter B. Ratledge on Wednesday, April 16, 2014 - 10:34 pm:

Iam responding to Michel Grady.
I use Simichrome Polish to remove stubborn spots
on my brass. I maintain the brass with Cape Cod brass polish.Any spot that does not come off,I use
Muriatic acid thinned 50-50 with water and a cotton
swab to remove the spot.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Thursday, April 17, 2014 - 11:25 am:

The proper term for those washers is "Mack Basin Washer" available at any hardware store .

Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By michael grady on Thursday, April 17, 2014 - 05:00 pm:

Thanks all...

I wound up buying an air driven polisher and used Prism. Works like a charm and looks brand new!

Goodness - that black stuff gets all over though

Michael


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