Very early Fords at auction

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Very early Fords at auction
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Manuel, Lafayette, La. on Friday, April 25, 2014 - 10:47 am:

!904 AC and 1907N coming up at no reserve auction at Bonhams auction. Maybe someone can post a link. Article on Hemmings Daily also.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Mc Willie on Friday, April 25, 2014 - 11:12 am:

Here's the link to the catalog:

http://www.bonhams.com/auctions/22174/

Lots of great early stuff including a 1911 Torpedo, a couple of 1914 tourings, a neat speedster, and lots of parts including an open valve engine on a one piece pan, etc etc. etc.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darel J. Leipold on Friday, April 25, 2014 - 12:03 pm:

Clean out you stock investments, sell your buildings, etc and head for NJ on May 10. That Ford AC or the Model N would look nice back here in MN. The 1910 engine would be a plus.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darel J. Leipold on Friday, April 25, 2014 - 12:06 pm:

The 1911 Torpedo has a few later parts on it. I suspect it does not have the original engine. Still an interesting T and a great start. Buy the 1910 engine to put in it. The 1910 engine is missing the trans cover and an original cover now bring over $1000.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Friday, April 25, 2014 - 12:12 pm:

Seeing as they list prices in both $ and Pounds on the web site, you may need to do more then liquidate your holdings! :-) Isn't the outfit doing the auction at the upper end in the auction field?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Watson -Florence,Colorado on Friday, April 25, 2014 - 01:37 pm:

The 1904 AC and 1911 Torpedo would take up less space than a Model K
Somebody Please Post what the 2 Early Ford's and 1910 engine sell for.
If Rob bought the 1904 we would learn all about them

-Don


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Friday, April 25, 2014 - 05:51 pm:

I like original cars and both the model N and the 1904 Ford would look very nice alongside my original '12 touring and the other barn fresh brass cars I have.

It might be worth the trip just to get up close and personal. Bonham's did an auction here in the NW a few years ago of a Stutz collection and other brass cars, they must have learned something from that auction because this catalog seems to be better organized and photographed.

As we all grow older more and more of these collections seem to be coming up. There was a old time collector at Bakersfield this year and at 85 he was through restoring and touring. He cleaned out his garage and the good stuff was picked over Thursday night as he was unloading. Even though you were not supposed to sell on set up day, he told me "what the hell", I'm 85 and never coming back here so what if they throw me out !!!!! What I bought from him was at 1970's prices and some really good brass era goodies.

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Friday, April 25, 2014 - 07:32 pm:

Note Trent’s “Early Ford Database” shows that car Model N 5362 as shipped Jun 20, 1907 to Standard Motor Car Co., San Francisco, CA.

[ A little off topic but too good to pass up. Just above serial number 5362 was 5361. The ledgers show Model N 5361 shipped on Jul 20, 1907 to the same company. And on Jul 2, 1907 another N5361 was shipped to the same company. I would guess either an error in the ledger or someone accidently stamped a second engine with 5361. And they were not going to toss the block because of a clerical error.

A nice collection of cars. I would love to know about the paint combination on the Model N Ford – if it was the original paint or not.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alex Dragone on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 07:16 pm:

I was fortunate enough to make an offer on the entire collection and take a look at the cars in the building. Not much of anything that great. The two early fords and the steam pumper are the three best things. That original 1914 touring that is there has a few mismatched parts such as the wrong rear end and all of the fenders are cracked and its missing the rear cushion. The other 14 touring also has a later rear end. Almost every car in the place had a stuck or cracked motor which Bonhams fails to mention. The only thing original on the 1911 Torpedo is the frame and the body. The rear end and the front axle are wrong as well as the engine which is a late post 1919 engine. The open valve engine is a 1910 engine as the number is: 22255, which falls sometime in 1910. Some decent lamps and parts there though. If anyone is interested I can post pics of the stuff as it was in the building.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alex Dragone on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 07:18 pm:

Also I think someone at Bonhams finally figured out that the open valve engine should probably be sold with the 11 torpedo because it says that the engine was amended on their website.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 07:30 pm:

Alex, post some pics please


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alex Dragone on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 08:08 pm:

Here are a couple of pics:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alex Dragone on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 08:10 pm:

Also, the paint on the Model N is not original. Its very old but not original. The early A has original paint on the chassis but the body had been painted a while ago.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alex Dragone on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 08:17 pm:

Here is the rear of the 14:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Paulsen - McPherson, KS on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 09:05 pm:

In the fine print it states there is a 10% buyers premium on the cars plus state sales tax if you are from NJ, NY, AZ or CA.

As if that isn't enough, there is a 25% buyers premium + 7% NJ sales tax on most everything that is not a car. Has anyone seen 32% added on top of the hammer price before?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 11:14 pm:

Chris,

By all means if those terms are not agreeable to you then stay away from the sale. These terms are typical and normal auction fees.

I like the two 1914 tourings.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Paulsen - McPherson, KS on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 11:42 pm:

I agree. They state the terms and a person can choose to abide by them or not bid. I know the 10% is quite typical. I have just never seen a 25% premium plus sales tax on top of that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Sunday, April 27, 2014 - 09:46 am:

I don't think about the fees, they are irrelevant to me. I think about the final price to me including the fees. If that final number is too high I stop bidding. It matters not one bit to me if the auction company makes a profit as part of the free enterprise system.

The owner of the estate negotiated those fees. They are what they are. Why would you care? The price you pay is set by you and you alone.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Sunday, April 27, 2014 - 09:58 am:

Why do you care if he cares? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, April 27, 2014 - 10:28 am:

I don't care, and I don't care who cares. What were we talking about?

The buyer's fee reminds me of a grocery store that had a +10% policy. The prices posted in big numbers were followed by +10% in tiny print. This was in a poor neighborhood, and I assume was meant to take advantage of those unsophisticated enough to believe the large print. At checkout the extra ten percent was applied.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Friday, May 09, 2014 - 06:38 pm:

Better check the on-line catalog guys. I understand lots of things, (some model T parts), have been pulled from the auction, as well as several other pieces.

If you're planning on traveling there, check it out first!!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison_Rice Minnesota on Friday, May 09, 2014 - 10:49 pm:

Ask Stan Howe about premiums at auctions. He has an appreciation for them and explains a reason for them that takes a little sting out of a lot of it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Saturday, May 10, 2014 - 02:59 am:

One doesn't have the facilities and professional staff those high profile auction houses have by operating from wood sheds and paying minimum wage.
Those types of auction houses typically get the high dollar bidders too.
If they didn't they wouldn't be in business.
It's the same in every collector category be it coins, cars, stamps or whatever else.
If you want cream of the crop prices you pay a cream of the crop auction house to get the prices for you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Saturday, May 10, 2014 - 11:14 am:

The auction companies that charge a buyer's premium also charge the seller to sell the item, it the west, this type of auctioneer does not last long. Prices at auctions with buyer's premiums can actually be lower, as the buyer must calculate what the actual price is. In Idaho, the auctioneers charge a percentage of the finial bid, no adding on to the bid to get the cost to the customer (except for addition of state sales taxes, but most big auctions are farm and thus exempt from sales tax)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John T. Tannehill on Saturday, May 10, 2014 - 01:34 pm:

We'll the open valve engine and one piece pan sold for under 5000.00 including premium. wonder who scored that deal. On the other side of the auction a pair of e&j 1908 brass lights in not so great condition went for 1800.00, then a Rands windshield went for 100.00.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Saturday, May 10, 2014 - 02:39 pm:

Wow. Great price for the engine!!!!!!!!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John T. Tannehill on Saturday, May 10, 2014 - 04:08 pm:

The 04 Ford ac went for 88k and the 1911 torpedo 34k the Ford N 43k, A lot of the parts and engines went for very low dollars. There was a 4 cylinder saxon engine that looked complete that sold for under 600 i believe. Sure would have been great to be there. I have never bid on anything on the phone during a live auction like that. How do you arrange for packaging and shipping if you do win an auction from a distant location. Do these auction company store items for a period of time to arrange for pickup?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Memmelaar Jr on Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 09:44 am:

I wanted to follow-up with this thread as I went to the auction and had a great time. It was run very professionally, and the hammer prices were somewhat reasonable on some items were reasonable and on others were head scratching high.

The lights were crazy high, the cars were fair market for what they were to maybe a little high, but the real deals were in the parts. Keeping the buyers premium in mind you had to watch what you bid, but teens engines were being almost given away, I bought a ruckstell that looks reasonable for $600 plus premium, but the real deal of the day went to the Paulsen's for their 1910 engine purchase.

I tried to convince my wife a number of times to bring the 1929 American La France fire truck home, and I really did not get too far. Oh well.


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