How to Remove Snubbers from spring?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: How to Remove Snubbers from spring?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole on Friday, April 25, 2014 - 08:59 pm:

I have a '14 Touring that has the incorrect rear axle with snubbers. Can anyone advise how to go about safely removing the snubbers?

Any does anyone have a '14 rear axle laying around near northern Illinois?

Thanks,
Jimrear axle


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Friday, April 25, 2014 - 09:12 pm:

Those are first,Hasslers and not snubber shacks. They can be removed with a piece of all-thread,some washers, and a few nuts.You must compress the spring before removing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole on Friday, April 25, 2014 - 09:35 pm:

Hasslers...ahhhhh, gotcha! Can you explain the "all-thread" part? Do you mean use a long threaded bolt?

Thanks,
Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Friday, April 25, 2014 - 09:37 pm:

Go to the hardware store and ask them for some all-thread. Comes in 3 foot length,cut as long as you need it to be.Use at least 1/2 inch size.Try not to hurt yourself.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole on Friday, April 25, 2014 - 09:54 pm:

I don't want to mess this up- potentially dangerous stuff here. Can someone explain how they have done it safely? Or provide a pic of the set-up? This is a first time for me with Hasslers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Friday, April 25, 2014 - 10:01 pm:

This is how I removed the Hasslers from my roadster. I don't like them (I think they're ugly).

A simple spring compressor can be made from a threaded rod, two nuts and a flat piece of rectangular steel with a hole drilled in it.

Put the threaded rod down the center of the Hassler and through the hole at the bottom bracket, attach one nut at the bottom under the bracket. Put the piece of flat steel and nut on the top end of the coil and proceed to tighten the top nut.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Friday, April 25, 2014 - 10:14 pm:

Installation instructions - may be slow to load:

http://www.modelt.org/mtfcivb/showthread.php/295-Hassler-Thirty-Minute-System-Of -Installation


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole on Friday, April 25, 2014 - 10:51 pm:

Thanks Erik- I think I get it now. I need to get a large piece of rectangular steel- that's the part I didn't visualize.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Friday, April 25, 2014 - 11:23 pm:

The flat piece of steel is not large. It simply serves as a washer. Ignore figure XII in the instructions.

Length = at least the width of top of spring

Width = smaller than the width of the slot in the top of the bracket.

I did some more searching - see this post - this will give you an idea:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/50893/53569.html?1208891118

This is the original tool that came with Hasslers when new. The original tool has a "T" on the bottom. This is what you are trying to emulate with a threaded rod (all thread), two nuts and a flat piece of steel. Instead of a T on the bottom, you install a nut on the all thread, under the Hassler bracket which has a hole in the center. Make sense?

1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Friday, April 25, 2014 - 11:33 pm:

http://www.modeltford.com/item/HAS-T.aspx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 12:20 am:

Here's the homemade clamp I use for compressing the Hassler spring.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 10:42 am:

Pics truly are worth a $1K words- thanks for the help. I really appreciate the pics and descriptions. You guys are great!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 11:31 am:

Looks like I can only get about the diameter of a 1/4-20 rod with a nut down into the lower seat of the hassle. There just isn't a way to slip a larger diameter rod and nut down into it....sound about right?

Thanks- Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 11:57 am:

Put the nut on after inserting the rod.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 01:20 pm:

I guess maybe just a long set of pliers are needed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 11:56 pm:

James
Use the 1/2 inch threaded rod and put a pin in it like the above samples. If you look at the bottom of the lower bracket you will see a hole with a slot that's were the pin goes through. There is a notch on the bottom side of the lower bracket 90 deg. to that slot that locks and keeps the threaded rod from turning when you compress the whole assembly. Once the spring is compressed you can remove the lower bracket and spring. Use a piece of threaded rod long enough that when you take the nut off it released all the springs compression. uncompressed the spring is about 8 inches or so. You might want to put a piece of 2X4 under the spring eyes to take the pressure off the shackles.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole on Sunday, April 27, 2014 - 08:46 pm:

Did it all today and it worked like a charm! Here's a pic of the rod that I fabricated to remove the Hassler spring. Thanks for the priceless advice! I couldn't do this hobby without the great experience and help from fellow T'ers.tool I ended up scrapping the round washers and cut a rectangle to fit inside the Hassler spring saddle- Voila!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willie K Cordes on Sunday, April 27, 2014 - 10:08 pm:

Life is sometime very funny, one persons wants to remove Hassler shocks and the next person spends good money to add them.
I like all peroid accessories except on the very early cars. They add a little something different to a plain Jane car.
Very early to me is 1912 and earlier.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole on Monday, April 28, 2014 - 09:16 am:

There's something for everyone when it comes to variations.


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