Bay Bridge Sue

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Bay Bridge Sue
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 10:29 am:

Those of you who knew Sue from the Forum in past years, knew she could fix a T as good as any guy. Her posts were always helpful.

She just now responded to a forward I sent about Bill Mauldin, the famous cartoonist, and she gave me ok to post this:

> Thanks for remembering me, and thanks for sending this over! ;-)
>
> One of my favorites was the guy shooting the jeep… of course, it was a Willy’s, not a Ford… They shoulda' used vanadium, and fewer spurious parts. ;-) The other was Lincoln weeping…
>
> BTW – left the bridge years ago – 2 promotions and a trip through Sacramento (hopefully left the corruption behind!), now Hazmat Manager (Still for Caltrans) in NE California – from Corning to Oregon, and the Mad River (west of Weaverville) to Nevada. Huge territory, everything from the valley to the big trees to the Desert! Bought a house with some history – the shop (my “girl cave” (lol) ) was an 1870’s smithy on the Nobles Immigrant Trail. Restored, but enough character to make it nice! (Small, but nice!) Unfortunately, it was built to Horse Dimensions, not Horseless Carriage Dimensions… can’t win ‘em all, eh?
>
> Hope all has been well with you, it was great seeing your name pop up! Say hi to the gang for me…
>
> Take care!
>
> Susanne


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 10:34 am:

Now that I think of it, there have been a lot of frequent posters that have disappeared one way or another over the years. I enjoyed her posts too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 11:06 am:

The drawing by Bill Mauldin could have been a Ford, it was Willy's jeep, but not a Willy's, it was a Willys, up until Bill Mauldin, the name was pronounced like Willis, but because of Willy and Joe, people started calling the Willys jeep Willy's. The Ford version was the GPW, and was virtually identical to the Willys MB. Henry did not want to have to provide any warranty work for the Willys jeeps, so he marked every part on the GPWs and the GPAs (the amphibious version)with a script F. The bolts have a relief f forged in the head, the sheet metal parts have an f stamped in them and cast parts have an f or ford cast into them. Bolts and screws smaller than 5/16th are not marked. The iconic jeep grill that is used as a trademark was designed by Ford people.
Best
Gus


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 11:20 am:


Here is a photo of a Ford GPW in action.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 11:37 am:

Willys, not Willy's.
I often wondered what happened to Bay Bridge Sue.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 11:41 am:

OK, now I read the whole post by A. Gustaf.
Sorry.
It seems to me the front cross member of the frame was round on one make and not on the other.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 11:49 am:

Aaron,
You are partly right, the Willys has a tubular cross member, but when Ford started manufacturing the GPW, some were built with Willys supplied frame components, so it is possible to see GPWs with MB cross members, but the omega shaped cross member is the ford design.
Best
gus


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 11:58 am:

Yes, I remember Bay Bridge Sue. Kinda miss her too, because her posts were always interesting.

All the best, Sue. I hope that at least you're lurking on the Forum.

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 01:55 pm:








Trusty old Ford being put down :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 02:01 pm:

Feller holding the bible should probably stand some place else.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 02:02 pm:

Looks like the man holding the Bible is about to find out why it's unwise to trust someone who covers his eyes when pulling the trigger.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 02:03 pm:

You beat me to the draw, Robert!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 06:10 pm:

I always enjoyed Bay Bridge Sue's comments on the forum. Glad she is doing well. Ed is quite right, we notice a presence right away but it often takes a long time for an absence to sink in.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 06:47 pm:

Like Alex Alongi,....?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 06:49 pm:

Yes, like Alex. Anyone know how he's doing?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 07:26 pm:

I never met Alex, but I always enjoyed his posts, and your comment Dick made me realize that Alex Alongi is one of those that we have not heard from in a very long time. And I do remember that he was having some health problems. (???)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 09:53 pm:

Yes, Bay Bridge Sue had some very good advice. I am still hoping one of these days we can find a clearly documented 1915 that was assembled at the 1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition in San Francisco, CA. She was told her 1915 was assembled there but and it may have been. But I wonder if they had some sort of tag or other indication that they were assembled there?

The last posting I saw for Alex is on the 2010 forum. Hopefully he is doing ok.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 10:35 pm:

Ralph -- Thanks for posting Sue's message. I always enjoyed her posts and felt that she would be about as good a Model T mechanic as anyone. She posted a while back that she had left employment at the Bridge, but not much more. I assume that she still has Angel and that she's still Model T'ing.

I'd like to hear from her again; maybe this thread will encourage her to join us once more.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale L Myers on Sunday, April 27, 2014 - 08:55 am:

Here is one of her posts that I printed in 2004. It's a shame more of the old forum is not available any more.



FWIW Bill Mauldin's book "Up Front" is a good read.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, April 27, 2014 - 10:10 am:

The story I heard on the origin of the jeep is that it didn't come from Willys or Ford, but was developed by American Bantam. In this version folks from Ford and Willys were present when the prototype was demonstrated for government officials. When it came time to produce the vehicles, the government people didn't think American Bantam was big enough to handle the job, and the contracts went to Willys and Ford.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Sunday, April 27, 2014 - 11:35 am:

Steve,
You are mostly right, Bantam was one of the over 100 car manufacturers that was contacted to develop a 1/4 ton scout car. the were the only company to develop a prototype. It was demonstrated to the Army and it was decided that it was what they needed, but American Bantam was too small to produce enough to fill the need. As the contract with the government was to develop the prototype, the government owned the design and they gave it to Willis and Ford to develop their own prototypes to compare with the Bantam BRC. Willys developed the Quad and Ford the GP, each company produced about 25 thousand vehicles. At this point, Wilys got the contract but the could not meet the demand, so Willys was ordered to license Ford to build the Willys model, which was designated the GPW. American Bantam got a consolation prize to produce 1/4 ton trailers for the jeeps. Most of the early pre-production vehicles were sent to Britain and Russia through the Lend/Lease program early in WWII when the US was still neutral.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDonald-Federal Way, Wa. on Sunday, April 27, 2014 - 12:19 pm:

There is a book RARE WW2 Jeep. Featuring the Willys-Ford Jeeps fitted with the Snow Bird tracks and skies It was called the T-29 & T-28 Half Track. It never made out of The Aberdeen Proving Grounds. Mark Askew in the UK has found and restored the only one that survived, he was unaware of the connection with The Arps Corp.- Snow Bird connection until after the book was published and I contacted him. This is T related because The Snow Bird started out on the Model T.
Mr. Askew has the only collection that has one of every type of the JEEP designs and modifications used in WW 2 all in operating condition.
PS: Note the 19" model A rear wire wheels.

Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Sunday, April 27, 2014 - 03:10 pm:

Steve,

You are correct. The "Jeep" was developed in my home town of Butler Pennsylvania by the Bantam Car Company. There is a historical marker at the site on Hanson Avenue where the company once stood. If I remember my Fathers story correctly he said he saw them testing the the car over some very rough ground and the officer riding in the back had one heck of a rough ride trying to hang on as they scaled a hill.

Butler hosts an annual "Jeep Convention" that attracts people from all over the United States and several countries.


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