Correct top prop nut

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Correct top prop nut
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Sole on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 07:42 pm:

The top prop nuts on my 1927 roadster are nickel plated caps over an iron base. They measure 1 13/32" wide.
In original photos most of the prop nuts look dark but sometimes they appear light as if they are nickel plated.
Can anyone confirm if these are factory original?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 11:12 pm:

This is the 15 millionth Model T built. It came off the assembly line as you see it here. Like every 1927 Model T touring, the prop nuts were painted black. The car is completely original including the tires, on display at the Henry Ford.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Sole on Sunday, April 27, 2014 - 05:30 am:

Thanks Royce. I've seen this car a couple times at the Henry Ford Museum many moons ago (before I acquired my roadster). Wish I had had a decent camera back then for collecting details.

I don't know if it's my computer screen or my ever-aging eyes, but the steering gear appears to be polished brass in this picture. That is nickel plated, isn't it?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Sunday, April 27, 2014 - 06:46 am:

Unfortunately the 15 millionth car has been repainted, who know what else was done?
In 1927 Ford offered a jazzed up version of the open cars called Sport roadster / Sport touring with gypsy curtains and a top booth. Don't know if nickeled prop nuts was included in the package? Some model A:s had nickeled prop nuts with the same thread, that's for sure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, April 27, 2014 - 10:36 am:

Here's the 15th Million in new paint fresh, no nickel on the top prop nut, and nickel on the steering case.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Sunday, April 27, 2014 - 11:12 am:

The one you posted looks like old stock, but is probably aftermarket. They are 1 1/2" diameter, and are black.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Sole on Friday, May 02, 2014 - 01:21 pm:

Thanks for the info guys. I'm going to pop for the black repos.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Friday, May 02, 2014 - 06:03 pm:

With Model Ts being built in various plants and countries, how did they determine this was THE 15 millionth car? Considering Henry's accounting methods (or lack of them)in the T era I harbor some doubts as to the validity of this particular car being the actual 15 millionth produced. I suppose if not the actual car it is a symbol of the 15 million produced world wide and that is good enough.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Friday, May 02, 2014 - 06:46 pm:

I would think it would be due to the engine number which is valid enough I think even though the branch plants probably made another 1000 cars while they were having their little ceremony. BTW, has anyone here actually seen the stamped engine number? I've seen the car but, the hood was closed and off limits of course.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Friday, May 02, 2014 - 06:53 pm:

Factory photos of 15th million. :-)



Note the engine in the background, either 14,999,999 or 15,000,001 :-)




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Friday, May 02, 2014 - 09:34 pm:

Thanks Dan , I've never seen those photos. I think it's more than safe to call that the fifteen millionth Ford. Just like when the branch plants got their assigned blocks of numbers, they were just bins full of parts on an assembly line until the assigned numbers came along and were met by that guy with the hammer and punch. The number is the car.


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration