Putting my 1925 TT to work

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Putting my 1925 TT to work
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ryan Glowacki on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 - 06:49 pm:

Installed honeybees today. Mr. T. comes in handy when you need a nice big workspace out in the woods.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 - 06:56 pm:

I keep my TT flatbed backed into the garage. It's the MOST USEFUL work surface I've ever had in there. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ryan Glowacki on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 - 07:05 pm:

An instant mobile work bench!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 - 07:21 pm:

And I bet Mr "T" loved every minute of attention he got !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ryan Glowacki on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 - 07:36 pm:

I love that he is still so useful at 89 years old. He fits on the farms old roads perfectly. Modern trucks are too big to get down in the woods here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 - 07:50 pm:

The rolling workbench is good.

Never seen hives with a roof like that. . Wish somebody would take the hive out of our fireplace flue.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ryan Glowacki on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 - 08:27 pm:

I custom made the roofs and bases. :-) give em a little class.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren W. Mortensen on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 - 11:33 pm:

Are they Langstroth hives or are you using something else? Just got myself all the supplies for 3 hives. I don't expect honey this year but figure I'll try to get 1 or 2 established and set up for wintering.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ryan Glowacki on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 - 11:47 pm:

I use langstroth hives. Custom built the roofs and bases. My first hive gave me over 90 pounds of surplus honey the year I put them in so don't count out the possibility of honey this year. As long as you leave them plenty for winter. Mine died in those ridiculous -25 degree nights we had over and over this winter. Where do you live Warren? If you have lots of plant diversity you can get lots of honey. Mine are in the woods because I've got black cherry trees, linden trees, and tulip trees that bees love.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Thursday, May 01, 2014 - 09:04 am:

To all of those raising bees, thankyou for helping to preserve those vital insects!

I sure hope they figure out what is killing all the bees and stop it before they're all gone, we would be in a world of hurt without them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, May 01, 2014 - 09:12 am:

This "Winter" in N.Florida has been hard on the bee's it would start to get warm then just when the new queens would go out for the mating flight it would freeze again and it would send the hives into a swarming frenzy, and now the fruit trees and gall berries and blackberries are in full bloom


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pat Kelly on Thursday, May 01, 2014 - 09:58 am:

I just put the second deep on my four hives, They are really packing in the pollen. We clad our hives in 3" foam insulating board in the winter. I think it really helps conserve heat. Our first year we got 71/2 gallons of honey from three hives. We left all the honey in the deeps for the bees to winter on. Had to get all the work done so I could take the T out for a cruse an a rare sunny afternoon.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill dugger on Thursday, May 01, 2014 - 11:31 am:

To the Beekeepers, are you ab bit concerned about the Africianized bees? They are really mean. In So-Cal they have them and can cause a real problem as being mean. They get upset and sting any thing that gets near them. I guess it is impossible to control or get rid or them. I had some but had an invasion of wax moths and lost two hives before I could control it. Now I do not have a place for them and they here in our area charge a personal property tax.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ryan Glowacki on Thursday, May 01, 2014 - 03:31 pm:

Hey Bill, Lucky me I live too far north for the african bees. They have, so far, stopped south of Illinois. My bees are very gentle. I installed them this week with nothing but some sugar water sprayed on them (so they don't fly when pouring them in the hive). No smoke needed. But we also have cool days right now (60's) so they are a bit sluggish.

One of my hives last year died from colony collapse disorder. I opened the hive up and there were just a few hundred bees in there. The rest were gone. Scientists believe the culprit to the "disappearing honeybees" may have to do with a newer class of pesticides called "Neonicotinoids" which are coated on seeds (corn, soybeans here) before they are planted, and grow up into the plant. The tests the govt uses now to determine if a pesticide kills pollinators (which it can't do to get approved) is to basically spray it on, or feed it to a pollinator. If it dies, it is not approved.

The theory is that neonicotinoids that are grown into the plant don't kill bees right away. Instead, when bees start collecting pollen/nectar from a source with neonicotinoids, the pesticide starts building up in the hives honey and pollen stores, in all the bees, and reaches a critical level at nearly the same time (all the bees are eating the honey) and when it reaches a critical state, the pesticide will cause a change in the nervous system of the bee, messing with its ability for homing, and it will go out on a gathering flight, and not know how to get home. This will happen to all the bees at about the same time, and the bee keeper will have what had looked like a pretty healthy hive just suddenly have 1/10th of the bees in it that it should. The bees that are left just die in the hive.

Again, they don't know, but there are lots of studies popped up in the last few years focusing on neonicotinoids.

If you guys are looking for a fun little hobby that doesn't take too much time, you should look into beekeeping. I didn't know anything about it and haven't ever asked anyone either. Just hopped onto You-Tube, watched some "how to" videos, figured out the stuff I would need and did it. If you can make a Model T go, you can keep bees. And the best part is, unlike Chickens, etc. that need constant attention/feeding/letting in/letting out, bees just need managed. You check on them every few days or once a week when you start them out, and then every few weeks over the summer, to see when its time to add more boxes or harvest honey. You can still go on vacations and do other things. I love keeping bees.

I work and rent in downtown Chicago, keep the remnants of my great grandparents farm in order in central IL, restore my buildings, clean my house, work on my T, work on my dodge, my ford, my McCormick tractor, take vacations, visit family, and still have time to keep bees, all by myself for the most part. Trust me, it is doable, and your plants (and your neighbors plants) will thank you! And coffee tastes so much better with honey in it!


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