How to tighten Hyatt Bearings

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: How to tighten Hyatt Bearings
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Corts on Thursday, May 01, 2014 - 11:18 am:

What is the best way to tighten Hyatt Bearing cages so they don't slop around?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Thursday, May 01, 2014 - 11:57 am:

Short of fining better ones, stake the ends of the pins holding it together. This would be a short term fix as the holes in the end plates and pins will be over and under sized from moving and will more then likely get loose again.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Thursday, May 01, 2014 - 02:16 pm:



Here are a pair of Hyatt's that have been 'repaired' over the years. The one on the left has been peened, but its still loose. The one on the right has been staked at the 4 fastening bars / pins, but time will take its toll on this and it will get loose again.







Now here is a good condition Ford Hyatt, still tight cage, and rollers nice and in spec. This one is a keeper and choice for reuse.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Thursday, May 01, 2014 - 02:48 pm:

i use a ballpeen hammer on the end of the rod.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Corts on Thursday, May 01, 2014 - 05:16 pm:

What about welding them then grinding down the weld?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Thursday, May 01, 2014 - 06:08 pm:

Maybe I'm completely off in my thinking here, but why bother to "tighten" them at all? It should not make any difference. As long as the bearing contact surface on the axle is within tolerance, the sleeve is within tolerance, and the rollers are within tolerance, once the bearing is inserted over the axle and inside the sleeve, by definition the rollers are in the correct position. All the cage does at that point is prevent excessive longitudinal movement of the rollers and prevent them from rubbing each other as things turn.

Am I nuts? Don't answer that. Am I right?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By lorenzo leon on Thursday, May 01, 2014 - 06:17 pm:

[What about welding them then grinding down the weld] I think that a great idea


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, May 01, 2014 - 07:38 pm:

Henry, I think Hyatts needs all the guidance from their cages they can get.. They have a tendency to wear their cages loose, so maybe the flexibility in the rollers also gives a tendency to not roll completely straight?

When the cage is loose there's a risk the rollers also are worn out, they must be carefully measured before spending much energy stiffening up a loose cage. But letting it run loose would let the rollers run angled and would likely shorten the life of both the axle shaft and the Hyatt bearing..?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Thursday, May 01, 2014 - 09:38 pm:

Agree, that using a wobbly Hyatt will cause grief sooner or later.

Try to keep the cages 'tight' as twisting of the roller bearings themselves can lead to fracture of the roller bearing. Have never seen a weld repair on the cage, wouldn't do that myself for fear of weld/grinding particles getting into the hollow rollers, those are hard enough to clean, ultrasound cleaner has hard time cleaning them. For sure never sandblast or bead blast one!




Here are some hints from Ford Owner article, the cage can be staked back to firm. Peening in my observation just mushrooms open the cage hole, and the bar/pin will still wobble. Staking seems to work the best, as the edge of the pin is fixed to the cage,while a better,...but, if you can find a never worn to wobble Hyatt, that is best. :-)




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, May 01, 2014 - 10:18 pm:

My experience is admittedly rather limited, but in the rear axles I've disassembled for parts the wobbly bearings are a minority. A majority have had tight cages. It seems the ones that were loose also had excessive wear on the rollers. So did some of the tight ones, but the rollers with the least wear seem to be the ones in tight cages.


Should these be peened, or staked?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Friday, May 02, 2014 - 03:49 am:

The bearings in the box might appreciate new rods in the cages and maybe weld up and re-drill the cage ends.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By lorenzo leon on Friday, May 02, 2014 - 07:23 pm:

Braze..?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Friday, May 02, 2014 - 08:06 pm:

One thing for sure. For every T mechanic that thinks wobbly Hyatts are no good, there's as many or more that are willing to use them. So, don't scrap them. Somebody will take them off your hands.

I'm with Henry. I don't know that it's really all that important that they be tight. Some bearings don't have cages at all.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Friday, May 02, 2014 - 08:30 pm:

The Hyatt's I have, Have two types of cages. One is rectangular, the other is round. I tend to agree with Steve. If there is a box of them you don't have the time to clean and check them all pick the tight cage ones chances are they will be a little better for wear.
Also some will have the Ford logo and some not.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Morsher on Friday, May 02, 2014 - 09:21 pm:

The Ford model cars made before the model T used a brass cage that held the loose rollers in line. When taken apart, you would have a handful of rollers and the cage by itself. Also, no removable bearing sleeve. The rollers ran on the inside of the axle tube, and had to run parallel because of the brass cage. Of course, the metallurgy wasn't there yet,either, like they are with the Hyatts.
I would say you ideally want the rollers held in a horizontal , parallel position. If there is more wear on one end than the other, they will want to start shifting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Friday, May 02, 2014 - 09:39 pm:

Worn out parts with loose cage for Hyatt rollers to produce the associated wear.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Leonard J Evansic on Friday, May 02, 2014 - 10:05 pm:

The most important thing the cage does is keep the rollers from touching one another. There is a certain amount of looseness built into the bearing assembly. The reason The rollers are so long Is if the axle diameter is to spec, and the sleeve is like new, and it should be, the rollers can only run straight and true, even with a very loose cage. A shorter roller is not as good as a long one. This a very good bearing for the application and it requires no adjustments. i've found most used bearings are so close to spec, that a close visual inspection will tell you the ones that are bad and should be thrown away. There are millions of them out there.---Len


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