Old Photo- Overloaded T on Shorpy

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Old Photo- Overloaded T on Shorpy
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dane Hawley Near Melbourne Australia on Friday, May 02, 2014 - 06:24 am:

http://www.shorpy.com/node/17362


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Friday, May 02, 2014 - 06:46 am:

Needs air in the rear tire and what do you mean overloaded that front spring isn't touching the axel YET!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Friday, May 02, 2014 - 07:22 am:

Military ambulance in postwar duty. Great picture!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Friday, May 02, 2014 - 08:21 am:

Dane,

Thanks for posting the photo. I believe it is an Army surplus WWI vehicle similar to the one shown below from page 26 of the Oct – Nov 1993 “Vintage Ford” (used by permission to promote our club and hobby – CD set of back issues available from the club store. Note it is for 209 issues (assumes I did the math right) at $119.95 for approximately 58 cents and issue. And it doesn’t take up much shelf space. Available from the club at: http://modeltstore.myshopify.com/products/vintage-ford-on-cd . ) The caption on the photo below read in part “Instructional Laboratory Vehicle Surgeon Generals Office” and you can make out part of that in the lower right hand corner.

On the photo above and the one below, the metal windshield is designed to help protect the driver and passenger from bullets. The cowl is a different but the overall design of many of the WWI vehicles varied depending on who produced the body. And certainly some were produced and the war ended before they were able to be shipped over. And a few probably came back with the troops. Both photos have the above the axle wishbone. And while not visible on the photo below, you can still see the bracket is mounted up high that holds the tail light onto the body. Note the similarity in body construction.

Note they both have demountable rims. WWI ended Nov 1918. Both Bruce's Encyclopedia at: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/1919.htm and the MTFCI Judging Guidelines Sixth Edition (available from MTFCI store and the vendors) indicate non-demountable wheels used in 1918 model year production and demountables started in the 1919 model year. And they both use Jan 1919 as the beginning of the model year. So apparently the demountable rims may have been used earlier on the chassis/vehicles to support the war or perhaps both vehicles were produced Jan 1919 or later. Of course it would have been easy to convert a non-demountable set to demountables by the time the 1920 photo was taken above. But if anyone has additional details on when the demountable rims were first introduced at the Ford plant for war time or peace time production, please let us know.



Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, May 02, 2014 - 11:33 am:

Hap - Both photos also have one other thing in common; the drum shaped accessories under the headlights are some type of shock absorber, or at least some sort of "anti-bounce" device. Looking carefully at the Shorpy photo reveals a strap that is attached to the axle and, I believe, rolls up inside the drum shaped canister. I've seen them advertised somewhere before; I believe in some publication that is a reprint of Model T era period accessories. Comparison of the two photos leaves little doubt that, as you say, the Shorpy photo that Dane just posted is a World War One surplus Model T. Interesting,.....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Friday, May 02, 2014 - 11:34 am:

Hap, OT but interesting, I think. WWI didn't end with the Armistice on November 11, 1918, just the fighting. The United States signed a separate peace with Germany, ratified on November 11, 1921.

More detail at: http://www.ask.com/wiki/U.S.%E2%80%93German_Peace_Treaty_%281921%29


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, May 02, 2014 - 11:35 am:

Oops,....didn't read Royce's post carefully enough,....I think he nailed it,.....surplus military ambulance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Friday, May 02, 2014 - 11:38 am:

Devices similar to those are on my 26 Buick they have a coiled "main spring" inside I don't know if they were effective since the springs in mine have long since rusted away


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Friday, May 02, 2014 - 12:08 pm:

The original glass negative resides on the Library of Congress.

You can download a high resolution TIFF here:

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/npc2008010111/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Klem on Friday, May 02, 2014 - 09:53 pm:

That type of shock is called a "Snubber".
Had them on my '23 Buick.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Saturday, May 03, 2014 - 02:04 pm:

Eric,

Thanks for point to the higher resolution copy.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


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