Creeping toward authenticity ...

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Creeping toward authenticity ...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Mahaffey on Tuesday, May 06, 2014 - 04:58 pm:

... one small detail at a time for my 27 tudor. I was intrigued by the Walter T Fishleigh memo dated July 26, 1926, in the Ford archives specifying the use of nickel plate on the Improved Car engine. It not only specifies nickel plate on various screws, it states that also the spark plug caps, thumb nuts, and spark plug wire terminals shall be similarly embellished.

I've thus nickel plated my ignition parts:

spark plugs 1spark plug 2spark plug 3

I know, it's subtle, but the tudor likes it.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, May 06, 2014 - 05:24 pm:

Now, that's pure. Is the moleskin engine paint on your list? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Mahaffey on Tuesday, May 06, 2014 - 05:35 pm:

One thing at a time, Steve. Right now, it's Rustoleum in a spray can applied in 1968.

What exactly is "moleskin?" Is it brown or gray? Pyroxylin was probably gone off the motor in a few months, which could explain why I don't recall having seen it on an original engine.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By BRENT MIZE on Tuesday, May 06, 2014 - 06:29 pm:

James,
Those look amazing. Did you do the plating yourself?
I have a 27 sport touring and I read the same memo. I had no idea that those parts were plated. I am going to do mine too!
Thank you for the photos. They look great.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Tuesday, May 06, 2014 - 06:45 pm:

See this thread for a discussion about engine color:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/442321.html?1399415203


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Mahaffey on Tuesday, May 06, 2014 - 07:11 pm:

Mark,

The cut-away 27 engine at Ford looks definitive. I'm going to look into getting that color for my engine. It sort of resembles olive drab; a sort of brownish green. It looks good.

BRENT,

Yes, I did the plating in my shop, using a bottle of Krohn bright nickel plating solution, a nickel anode, a 500ml beaker, and a bench power supply set to 2.00 volts.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Tuesday, May 06, 2014 - 07:26 pm:

But are those manifolds correct? Never saw any like that before, but then, there's a first time for everything. Just being curious, not critical. Always learning.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Tuesday, May 06, 2014 - 07:29 pm:

Yes Tim, what you see is the Holley vaporizer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Tuesday, May 06, 2014 - 07:43 pm:

Kingston actually.......


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Mahaffey on Tuesday, May 06, 2014 - 07:44 pm:

Tim,

You see the manifold casting for a Kingston B-1 Gasifier, which is quite correct for a 27 Tudor. They are correct, but uncommon.

As for the paint on the manifolds, that's another question. Extensive research has turned up the correct color for the Kingston vaporizer: black. It was not painted, but was rather "blackened," probably with a phosphate or "raven" finish. Even the bronze pieces were blackened. The finish was not at all durable, and this explains why Kingstons are invariably found rusted, but I did get a NOS mixing chamber, and the cast iron, steel, and bronze are all blackened.

The carburetor finish is for another time.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Wednesday, May 07, 2014 - 02:19 am:

Little details make a big impression.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Wednesday, May 07, 2014 - 08:47 am:

Thanks all for helping me to continue to learn all the variances in these cars. Really cool. I really like the "lines" (shape) of both manifolds...they just look cool. Bob, you're right...this engine looks good like that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Mahaffey on Wednesday, May 07, 2014 - 09:11 am:

Tim,

I'm deeply in love with that carburetor! Instant cold starts, zero hesitation to accelerate, and increased hill-climb power over an NH. I could not ask for more. It looks exotic, but it's perfectly stock, and it's a great conversation piece for anyone who knows Model Ts.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Wednesday, May 07, 2014 - 10:20 am:

Should your regenerator have that long cast brass gas line extension?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Mahaffey on Wednesday, May 07, 2014 - 11:01 am:

Larry,

Yes, the extension should be installed, but it's not quite that simple.

The long brass extension was a Ford part, and I have examples ready to be installed. Why Ford chose to use this extension on all vaporizers rather than just make a specific gas line is not clear. The vaporizers were introduced in limited quantities in FY1925. Why make a gas line specific to the NH carburetor in the Improved Car when it was scheduled to be equipped with a vaporizer?

Be that as it may, the Kingston B-1 vaporizer you see in the picture is equipped with an extension that lowers the carburetor bowl to the height required by under-seat gas tanks, such as used in the 26/27 fordor. For any other Improved Car, the extension was supposed to be left off, raising the bowl and increasing the efficiency (reducing the aerodynamic friction) of the vapor and air channels. Ford, near as I can tell, ignored this assembly specification and installed all B-1s with the extension, using the lash-up of the NH gas line plus the weird line extension. (Fahnestock detailed this quirk in his Ford Owner magazine in 1927.)

In my list of tweaks to this car, I intend to take off the extension and try to configure it the way Kingston intended. It is interesting to note that there is a hole punched in the fire-wall, apparently there for the carburetor control to come through with the bowl lifted.

The Kingston vaporizer is interesting, isn't it?

Jim


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