Vacuum didn't do diddly

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Vacuum didn't do diddly
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Robb on Wednesday, May 07, 2014 - 01:01 pm:

About a month ago I told you of my attempt to reduce the engine oil leaks by pulling a vacuum on the crankcase via capping-off the fill pipe and running a vacuum line to the intake.
Well, it didn't do a thing for the leaks as some of you suggested, and it didn't suck oil up into the engine making a huge smoke cloud as some others predicted, in fact, it didn't make any difference at all.
I guess I'm going to have to tear-down and re-gasket the entire engine.
fun.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Wednesday, May 07, 2014 - 04:34 pm:

Use the Right Stuff by Permatex for no leaks. Ultra Black by Permatex has a longer working time and is nearly as good and a lot cheaper. Use solvent to remove any trace of oily surface.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Wednesday, May 07, 2014 - 05:15 pm:

I will start a new thread about disassembling parts that were put together with Right Stuff.

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Thursday, May 08, 2014 - 07:52 am:

I agree the Right Stuff is fabulous. I have had no particular issue disassembling anything assembled with it, but perhaps it is a matter of technique.

When using gasket sealant the object is to use as little as is necessary. The Right Stuff can be laid on a paper gasket in a bead 1/8" wide. You don't cover the entire gasket with a toothpaste tube width. If you use the appropriate amount of any brand of sealant it does not visibly squeeze out very much when you tighten the bolts.

I do use a copious amount on the felt gasket at the front of the hogshead, after making sure the felt gasket is the proper thickness. I apply enough at the ends of the felt to insure sealing completely. In this area it does squeeze out and needs to be wiped before it dries to give a good look after it is dry.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Schrope - Upland, IN on Thursday, May 08, 2014 - 08:56 am:

Bob - did you have the hole between # 2 & 3 plugged - tight? With that hole open, your vacuum will have no effect.
I have no dog in this fight - just making an observation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Thursday, May 08, 2014 - 11:46 am:

Clean up the under side of the engine and transmission also the area where it's parked or put a large sheet of cardboard under it. Take it out and run it, then park it on a clean cardboard and look for drips. You really only need to concentrate on the areas that leak. No need to pull everything unless the area leaking requires it. Unfortunately, a Model T is very hard to completely seal all drips. They usually leak at the front crankshaft seal, around the universal joint or around the pedal shafts. Those are the hardest places to seal.

If the leak is in the area where the hogs head and the block come together, you can sometimes seal by cleaning the area very well and then smearing gasket sealer around the edge where the crankcase meets the block and hogs head. You might need to take a screwdriver and force some sealer into the space between the hogs head, the block and crankcase. If that doesn't fix that leak, you will need to pull the hogshead and replace the felt seal. Put gasket sealer on both sides of the felt and a lot around the joint where all three pieces come together. When you tighten the bolts be very careful to tighten the one where the hogs head meets the block. It is very easy to crack off the corner of the hogs head at that point. Tighten all the bolts evenly a little at a time until they are all tight.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Thursday, May 08, 2014 - 11:52 am:

Are you telling us your Model T leaks oil? This is the first time I have ever heard of this.......:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Thursday, May 08, 2014 - 12:33 pm:

Michael is right - Ts never leak.
They dribble, drool, spurt, and gush but never leak!

I had a T with a major drool at the intersection of the hogs head, block and pan on both sides.
Since I was a bit lazy and cheap I decided to use "The Wrong Stuff" - Ultra Black Permatex.
I sprayed the areas with motor cleaner and then carb cleaner because I had them on the shelf.
Next I pushed the Ultra Black into the seam and let it dry for a day or two.
It hasn't drooled from those areas but it still dribbles from others.

I wonder if Flowmax would help the dribble! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Thursday, May 08, 2014 - 12:59 pm:

Sometimes I get confused and think that my T has a "total loss" oiling system like other cars from that era.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andrew Deckman, Ogden Utah on Thursday, May 08, 2014 - 02:17 pm:

If my T does not leak I PANIC!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Thursday, May 08, 2014 - 04:23 pm:

One thing I learned rebuilding 3 Model T's is to make sure the pan is straightened as well as possible before re-assembly to avoid major oil leaks. Besides the pan being slightly twisted it appears that some of us, past and present owners, try to stop leaks between the pan and block by over torqueing the nuts and bolts which warps the pan like a roller coaster at each bolt hole. I have my last and final build, the late 1919 Touring, down to the point it leaks only a drop or two on the floor occasionally but over the years have come to the conclusion that I would rather spend time actually driving the Model T to trying and make it leak free. Now a real oil gusher is another story.....:-)


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