Manifold Advice

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Manifold Advice
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan on Wednesday, May 07, 2014 - 02:40 pm:

I am ready to install my newly rebuilt engine in my recently acquired '26 Touring. I am going to stay with the stock exhaust, but I am wondering if I should stay with the standard cast intake or one of high volume ones? The engine specs are: .030 Aluminum pistons, 280 Stipe cam, Z head, and SCAT counterbalanced crank. I'm running a Holley NH on the car. Any ideas?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Wednesday, May 07, 2014 - 02:46 pm:

Look at the manifold on your car or truck engine which has many times the output of a 20 HP T.
Even a 20 HP air cooled engine has a smaller outlet than a T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Wednesday, May 07, 2014 - 03:05 pm:

Unless you plan on running it wide open you won't need the high volume intake, you won't like it, i have one for a car i am building and it has a dual exhaust, but i will use the standard intake.

Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Wednesday, May 07, 2014 - 03:54 pm:

Just will make for harder starting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker on Wednesday, May 07, 2014 - 04:35 pm:

We have an aluminum intake on the speedster. We found minor interference with the standard exhaust manifold and had to file a little off the top of the intake manifold. To my knowledge it has not made it hard starting, still use 6 volts and starts right up. I know the car has more poop than my regular T's, but we added lightness.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Elliott on Wednesday, May 07, 2014 - 05:04 pm:

I noticed more with the Z head burns the fuel nicley, ( hemi head) add a horse or two , blasts up the hills. on the high volumne intake , does'nt fit well I have one did not notice much, felt like its not much bigger , needs to be a bigger intake out there someday. the dual exhaust is nice but a mickey mouse way of mounting it withspacers and the kit bolts are too long, plus having to cut the fire wall a bit, but it breaths now and can go WITH QUICK RESPONSE AND UNLEASED POWER. another stock tip is to get your Tires to 50 psi


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan on Wednesday, May 07, 2014 - 05:55 pm:

Thanks to everyone for your feedback and advice. I think I have a pretty good idea of which way to go now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Elliott on Wednesday, May 07, 2014 - 06:46 pm:

I'd probably change to the high volume, cause if you're like me I think about it and it costs me later to change it. But that all goes with building the T. Accessories will follow with options , stock exhaust is fine. I use a tractor straight tube at tractor supply


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Wednesday, May 07, 2014 - 08:45 pm:

A characteristic of the high volume exhaust manifold seldom noticed until mounted on the engine is that because it is wider at the rear it blocks the position of the carb mixture adjusting rod. They are also quite a bit heavier than one might expect.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Jablonski on Wednesday, May 07, 2014 - 09:08 pm:

Kevin:

The engine in our '26 is similar except for the standard crank, with the addition of the advance valve timed cam gear. The intake is a Ford original from '13, aluminum, larger inside diameter. The repro aluminum intakes ??? Problems ?? no first hand experience. Engine starts, runs, idles better, IMH experience. Really like the Stipe 280 !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Thursday, May 08, 2014 - 11:13 am:

I used a reproduction aluminum on on my '13 touring, and couldn't tell the difference from the old one, even though I was advised it had been modified for more air flow. So I put the original on back on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, May 08, 2014 - 11:21 am:

Maybe the restriction lies in the carb, with a high volume intake then you could try a high volume carb to take advantage of the better flow?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Thursday, May 08, 2014 - 11:28 am:

I think that with more air flow in through the manifold you need larger intake valves to really take advantage. I tried an original aluminum intake and really didn't see any difference driving at normal T speeds so went back to standard cast iron intake and I think it ran better/as well and started easier.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Robb on Thursday, May 08, 2014 - 12:34 pm:

Now that's carburetion
A pair of 1930's one-barrel Zeniths and a home-made intake manifold (a piece of steel fence post!) will make it run like a rabbit!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Thursday, May 08, 2014 - 01:05 pm:

Hey Kevin - all cheesy jokes aside (but not for long) the BEST thing you could do for your car would be to upgrade that NH even if you keep the old manifold. A Stromberg OF from Stan Howe will change the "get up and go" on your car probably more noticeably than the Stipe cam and Z head together. It's the most economical and instant performance upgrade, plus, it's period correct!

I went from a nice NH to a Zenith S4BF like this one from Jay's AotD threads



and I kid you not, it was like adding 4 more pistons to the engine. It started easier, idled better, had WAY more acceleration, more top end, and all of that just from changing the carb. Honestly, with everything else you've done to the engine it's almost a waste NOT to get an upgraded period carb.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Thursday, May 08, 2014 - 08:48 pm:

My recommendation for the single best thing you can do to a Model T is more compression. Either a "Z" head, or milling a stock head, or high compression pistons.

I also agree with Seth that many of the aftermarket carbs give great results. I've had great luck with the Stromberg OF and the U&J in particular.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rodney Aspenson on Friday, May 09, 2014 - 10:21 am:

I have a question about the extra zip with a Stromberg or Zenith carb... Would the amount of fuel used, increase with the better carburetor??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Friday, May 09, 2014 - 10:32 am:

Hey Rodney, that's a complicated question. I don't think that these upgraded carbs use fuel any less efficiently than say an NH, so you're not going to lose MPG because they are thirstier. If anything I think tend to be even better.

However, because there is so much more zip available I know I tend to drive harder and get after it more because I can . . . which negates any improved MPG I might get from a superior design.


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