Another learning lesson engine inspection plate

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Another learning lesson engine inspection plate
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Kriegel Mishawaka Indiana on Friday, May 09, 2014 - 04:15 pm:

Well after a year I am slowly getting the 1926 hopefully running again after decades. Today I was beginning to install the bottom engine inspection plate, when I discovered that there are two metal backing plates, horse shoe shaped, inside the engine ! Also i discovered some oil tar debris on top and under these backing plates so more cleaning before reassembly. Another lesson learned. Slow but sure do it right


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Friday, May 09, 2014 - 04:54 pm:

You really need to buy a shop manual,and read it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Kriegel Mishawaka Indiana on Friday, May 09, 2014 - 05:39 pm:

Jack I have the black book and the white one. I am just not as smart or able to glean information from printed items like I used to. I went through the black book again and for the life of me on assembly could not see a reference to these two backing plates.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Friday, May 09, 2014 - 06:08 pm:

Those are commonly called pan horse shoes. All pans from when they stopped the one-piece(@1910) ,used them. The 26-27 pan shoes are different due to a lengthening on the inspection cover. They are all prone to leaks and many folks use various means to prevent them. Lots of sealer needed around the bolts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Friday, May 09, 2014 - 06:15 pm:

David

Along with the manual you need the appropriate model year Parts and Price Book, that shows many parts in pictures, and those 3101B (3 dip pan) and 3101D (4 dip pan) C.C.Reinforcements are shown.

And you should get the reprint Service Bulletin Essentials which compiled most of the Ford service bulletins from the factory to the dealer mechanics. That detail is told in a Service Bulletin.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Friday, May 09, 2014 - 06:30 pm:

That darned Black Bible is a hard read. Maybe it's the archaic writing style. I don't know but some times it can leave you staring at the wall trying to figure a passage out you just read 3 times already. The photo's stink too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Friday, May 09, 2014 - 07:15 pm:

LOL... I know the feeling. Yeah, it's like reading Shakespeare. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Friday, May 09, 2014 - 08:48 pm:

I'm glad I'm not totally alone in this. Aside from the writing style I sometimes wonder who the book was actually written for. It's like you're already supposed to know things. Chapter 1: disassembling the car. Really? Wouldn't normal maintenance or something like that be your first choice if it was written as a service manual? Just who was it published for? It can leave a shade tree mechanic scratching his head.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Friday, May 09, 2014 - 08:58 pm:

My book is 50 years old and although it is a reprint,(green cover)it almost looks original. I have used it for reference many years. If you look at pictures of what you are working on,it will get you there. Dad was a machinist and would not teach my brother and I any mechanics.He just said pay attention to how you took it apart and put it back the same way, only in reverse. He would answer a question if you got stuck,but you did the work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison_Rice Minnesota on Friday, May 09, 2014 - 09:20 pm:

Jack, I gotta agree with remembering disassembly and assembly methods. My Dad told me mark everything, if you can separate the major assemblies into groups and dedicate a place for them, you're better off. Wire things together, tape things together, nail or tape them to boards, stick the pushrods and valves in order through a piece of cardboard, every good toolbox includes duct tape, black electricians tape, paint markers, magic markers, grease pencils, a pad of paper, a camera, soapstone and pencils. When you take the gears, lock rings, synchronizes, etc off the shafts, stack, wire them in the order you removed them from the shaft. But he also told me to wipe off my tools and put them away. I'm sorry Dad, I've tried but at the end of the day I always leave a tool someplace it don't belong.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Friday, May 09, 2014 - 09:41 pm:

I have CRS so bad,I have to put tools back where they go.If I don't,I can look for days trying to find them!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Saturday, May 10, 2014 - 10:31 am:

I learned all about T's from the green book that Jack mentioned. They were made by Polyprints. I wore it out, and finally gave it away. I now use a well used original out in the garage, and have a very nice original to use in the house. Wouldn't be without this book.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Kriegel Mishawaka Indiana on Saturday, May 10, 2014 - 06:49 pm:

This forum to me has been wonderful. Before posting a question I do a Google search "MTFCA and then my question" I have learned so much from Posts going back to 2008 that I can not find in the Black book. As an example, the head bolt tightening pattern sequence i could not find in the Black book but there were 3-4 clear diagrams on this forum to follow ! This using the search function is probably along with parts availability what helps make the Model T's so popular Tonight i am researching helpful hints for installing the manifolds as I always seem to need one more hand doing the job right without something slipping !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Saturday, May 10, 2014 - 08:11 pm:

My tools are easy to find. They're all laying around on the floor somewhere. :-)

I have five tools boxes (roll around) and a couple of Craftsman 2-drawer type but the tools I use most often are kept in a small 6x12 flip-top tool box. That's easy to find. It's bright red and says Tool Box on the top. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 10:52 am:

When installing the inspection plate I found that by installing 2 headless studs in each "pan horse shoe" it is much easier to put the plate in position and put some of the retaining bolts in. Saves chasing the "pan horse shoes" around.

FWIW, I use headless studs lots of times in different applications for ease of assembly.


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