A New Car that can Pull a Flivver on a Trailer

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: A New Car that can Pull a Flivver on a Trailer
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 03:01 am:

The grand scheme of things has always included the eventual purchase of an open trailer because so many of the car shows I would otherwise attend are out of my Flivver's practical driving range. Oh, if I could have the Long Island Expressway all to myself, it would be a pleasureóimagine a long, smooth highway devoid of stop-lights and other cars! But ain't no way that's gonna happen, so I gotta get a trailer.

Anyway, as my 2000 Oldsmobile Intrigue presently has 240,000 miles on it and the gas-gauge, electric windows, mirrors and door-locks only work intermittently, and the engine hemorrhages oil and anti-freeze all over my driveway, Iím figuring itís time to purchase a replacement. So we started looking at AMERICAN cars that have sufficient towing capacity to pull a Tin Lizzie on a trailer (I'm a flag-waving, Pearl Harbor-remembering, apple pie-eating, eagle-screeching, baseball-watching, Elvis listening-to, hot dog-grilling patriot; I donít drive foreign cars and I don't apologize for it). Today, we checked out the GMC Acadia Denali and Buick Enclave SUVs. They're practically identical, mechanically speaking, and the only real difference is that the Buick has 4,700 pounds worth of towing capacity whereas the Jimmy has 5,200.

Either will get the towing job done and then some, but gas-mileage is poor (18/23) and wow, talk about sticker-shock! Money-wise, it's starting to look like it would make more sense to buy a gas-sipping, mid-size family car and a beat-up, used pickup for towing duties. On the other hand, I only buy a new car every fifteen years and by that reckoning Iím old enough that this next one may be my last (if not second to last), so maybe itís time to treat myself to something really nice.

Iíll see what Chevy and Ford have to offer and report back. Meanwhile, if you guys can point me in a non-pickup truck direction, Iíd sure appreciate it.

And I guess, after the car gets chosen, Iíll be asking about the best way to tie a Model T down and which open trailer to buy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 03:50 am:

Buy an old car that can pull the T on a trailer instead, much more fun :-)

..Like the 1947ish Mercury convertible or the 1939 Chxxy in this 1951 barn rescue movie:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPMZmhOKXNs


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 06:48 am:

I'm with you Bob. I've often said "I won't drive an import car, even if it is made in the US." Those lines are getting greyer every day, and I'm sure its just a matter of time before someone brings up domestic content, but I've never had anything, but an American made car. I'm not changing now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 07:04 am:



How about an Australian made Chevrolet SS...the last of the full size RWD v8s sedans.

Australia will spend more than $10b to buy USA made F-35 warplanes so do the right thing and buy Australian!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jerry knouse on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 08:55 am:

Old style ford explorer,2010 or earlier. These were built on truck platform. I have looked at many vehicles to replace my 2006 explorer, which I tow my T with, and nothing compares.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 10:25 am:

OZ got suckered into that turkey, too?

I would spend my money on an aux tranny with neutral, wheel brakes and towbar. About any car that has good brakes will pull a T. This one was 4,200 lbs.



You could even use a Brake Buddy to actuate the T's brakes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 10:33 am:

I like the way Constantine thinks, but in the owners manual under the heading "Trailer Towing" it says "This vehicle is neither designed nor intended to tow a trailer". We have a 2008 Pontiac G8 GT built on that same chassis, and love the car but I'd never even consider towing with it.

Today's trucks are practically cars now... they ride smooth and quiet, and they get decent gas mileage. The only thing that hasn't gone "soft" with them is the towing capacity. The factory brake controllers can't be beat either, they really work well.

A Chevy Tahoe with a 5.3L might be a good compromise between car and truck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 11:15 am:

You gotta watch their towing capacity and mpg ratings. They don't use the same truck for both ratings. The one they brag about the mileage on will be the 6 cyl version. The one they brag about the tow capacity will be the big v8.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 12:12 pm:

Derek, In Australia the same car called the Holden SS fitted with a 6.0L V8 (a smaller engine than what the USA SS gets) with an automatic transmission can tow "2100kg with trailer brakes / 750kg without trailer brakes" (taken from Holden website). How is it possible the Chevrolet SS cannot tow?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 01:10 pm:

They ain't that heavy. Don't get suckered into a gas hog that isn't needed. I'd prefer a stick myself but if you go for an auto trans add on an aux. trans cooler.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marvin Konrad on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 01:19 pm:

'Domestic' or 'Foreign'???? Just think about 'Where?' does the corporate sales profit flow to???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 01:25 pm:

Good question Constantine... I just checked the owners manual for our 2008 G8 GT with 361hp 6.0L V8 states that it can tow up to 2000 lbs.

I'm guessing GM doesn't want to warranty a car pulling a trailer with 415hp.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 01:38 pm:


A Suburban will do the job, but it's quite a gas hog.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 02:04 pm:

You might find an assembled in USA vehicle but you won't find a vehicle made in USA. Everything from the air conditioning to the sheet metal is imported. Very little of it is made in the USA. And if you think buying an "American" brand keeps the money here, you don't know Jack about the economy except the flowery reports you hear on social communist radio -- NPR. Even a big portion the money you spend on gas for it goes off shore.

But, I drift. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 02:22 pm:

Buick Roadmaster Estate Wagons are a popular tow vehicle with some of the guys in the Horseless Carriage Club in my area, especially the 1994, 1995 and 1996 models (they have the iron head version of the high performance 5.7L LT1 Corvette engine). One fellow says that the low profile and handling of the wagon makes it a superior tow vehicle to his SUV.

My parents have a 1996 Estate Wagon so I can vouch that it has both comfort and a motor with lots of guts and is a great car for traveling, swap meets and hauling the occasional large item. I've used it only twice for trailer towing a Model T so my experience is limited in that department.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George_Cherry Hill NJ on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 02:24 pm:

Derek,

GM has a hard time telling you in crystal clear English just what any of their product can do as far as towing.

The 2002-2007 Saturn Vue, 6-cyl, the one with the Honda motor and tranny...was actually rated for 3500# IF you added the surprisingly readily available secondary back cross tie. The one that just happened to bolt into place on weld-nuts already in the basic platform. GM never told you that was possible...but after following one that was flat towing something huge my son asked them at a rest stop how possible and they even gave him the part number for the crosstie, available at any GM dealer special order! He picked one up dirt cheap because most can't figure out that a Saturn Vue and a Chevy Equinox are the same machine under the skin and when Saturn went out the owner dumped it quick...so he added the crosstie, would think nothing of using our small trailer, or flat towing any of his military jeep stuff.

On the other front, the other son and I tend to stay with anything 'F' series...and if we can find one 25 years old and in decent condition when we need another, so much for the better! They too qualify for historic tags...they too can be insured for less than a Franklin each year...and on the basic 'F' series stuff, anything that breaks is always less than 50 bucks and always in stock at NAPA :-):-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 02:30 pm:

Steve, Only 350 ci carbureted gas Suburbans are gas hogs In 1983, I special ordered a 83 suburban, fully loaded, four wheel drive, 3.73 gearing, and 6.2 ci Diesel motor. I towed my 16' car trailer with my T on a lot of trips, and even some 64-70 Mustangs for a friend. I averaged 21 MPG unloaded, and 19 MPG loaded. It didn't have any reserve power, but you learned when to pass because I could live with that kind of mileage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John P. Steele, Montana on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 02:43 pm:

Erik those wagons are great. I've been looking for one for four years. Everyone I find is either trashed or pimped out. Great mileage and a ton of comfort.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 03:19 pm:

Bob,

So you are seriously planning on attending car shows & that is the reason for buying a tow vehicle ?

If so - you should start with the trailer.

The empty weight of the trailer combined with the weight of your T will determine the towing capacity the vehicle you choose must have ...


Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Barker, Somerset, England on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 03:24 pm:

My 2.2 litre diesel front-wheel-drive Jaguar X Type has no bother towing my '26 Coupe on a 4-wheel trailer. Mondeo and BMW 320 diesels are also fine.
Jaguar does 30mpg towing (but 45 normally!)

Diesel cars are the way to go.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Moorehead on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 04:13 pm:

Take a close look at the advertised towing capacity of all vehicles that have independent rear suspension. According to my research and the research of a friend, the only way you get get the maximum towing capacity is with a equalizing hitch, something the dealers or the owners manual don't discuss. I have been looking for a vehicle to replace our Envoy and can't find anything with descent fuel mileage, other than a truck that has the higher towing capacity without an equalizing hitch. That being said, I see a bunch of folks pulling trailers with small cars that are scarey to see going down the road. And you know they don't know what trailer brakes are, let alone having them. Maybe I am just too cautious, but all trailers I have pulled have had a tow vehicle with a solid rear axle. And trailer brakes that work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 04:47 pm:

I really like the Honda Ridgeline as it is a well designed and well built vehicle with pretty good gasoline mileage and nice 4wd set up, and about 280 hp, which isn't too bad, but the towing capacity is only 5,000 lbs. Kinda' "borderline" for trailering a Model "T" I think. In a year or so, Honda is supposed to come out with an newly designed Ridgeline. Maybe that one will be able to tow more,...???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul griesse--Granville,Ohio on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 04:50 pm:

I`ve got a 2007 Lincoln town Car and a 6cly. F150 truck--They both will tow my dual axel open trailor but the town car does it without any strain. I much prefer the easy ride of the Lincoln---at 75K miles I intend to keep it for at least another 100K miles...Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By samuel pine on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 05:04 pm:

As for me I would put the ball on the t and pull
some rice burner on a trailer. Think Men this
country was built with these. If I can push my
car with one finger ?? huh? My old man always said
you dont run it? take a picture of it. True run it
when it takes a dump ;; why worry when they stuff
you six feet in some hole. Not my problem let them
kids worry about it... and for Paul gresse my 85
town car rules, got it for -=0- done deal..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare - Just a little South West . on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 05:53 pm:

This Ford does just fine towing a T.



6 speed auto, more than enough power, plenty of room for 5.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare - Just a little South West . on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 06:13 pm:

Car or pickup - either or - they both do the same job.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 06:21 pm:

so let me ask: I have a 2002 Jeep Liberty. Can I haul my T with this car? My local trailer rental place says that I can't buy a trailer that will haul the car with Jeep.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare - Just a little South West . on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 06:43 pm:

William, l find that hard to believe !
There are two versions of that car
the 4 cyl 150 hp version which l guess is a little light on power - l wouldn't tow with that
BUT
The V6 3.7 l 210 hp version would be just fine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare - Just a little South West . on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 07:01 pm:

here is a posting for your year model Jeep Liberty l found whilst trawling for info.
This may or may not help - at this point after reading it, l cant tell whether you can or cant tow - that's odd, very very odd.....


Although your vehicle is rated to pull upto 5,000 lbs, I do not reccommend doing so. Chrysler is pretty lax about providing GCWR. But you should be pretty close to this:

GVWR: 5350#
GCWR: 9850#
GAWR F/R: 2750#/3150#
CURB: 3898#

Based on these numbers:
You can put 1150# in or on the truck. This includes the weight of any people or cargo in the vehicle as well as the tongue weight of the trailer.

The weight of the trailer cannot exceed 5000#, or 4500# if the truck is loaded to capacity.

All of this being said, I wouldn't do it. I have a Dodge Dakota for my service truck with a V8, four wheel disc brakes and high performance tires and I've been pushed around by trailers in the 4000# range. It's not a lot of fun. I would try to keep it under 3500# with a light load in the truck. If you have no choice and decide to load up and go for it, take it really easy and go slow. Make sure when you pick up the trailer that you get one with good brakes on it. It's often hard to tell, but if the trailer looks old and beaten, the brakes are probably no good. You are going to need all the help you can get if you need to stop that trailer in a hurry. Also make sure everything is well tied down, no matter how well you think it's packed. I've seen trailers take a sudden change of direction when the load shifted inside it. It's not pretty watching a trailer come apart as it goes into the ditch. Even worse when it's everything you own going with it.

I'm not trying to scare you, I just don't want to see any more of these 'accidents' simply because people were careless or uninformed.

Good luck,
Shayne Peterson
MobileHitch
http://www.mobilehitch.ca


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare - Just a little South West . on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 07:10 pm:

here is another posting.



The Towing Capacity of the First Generation Jeep Liberty


By Harry Havemeyer, eHow Contributor













Share



Print this article


Jeep introduced the Liberty compact SUV during the 2002 model year as a replacement for the Cherokee. The Liberty's first generation of production lasted through the 2007 model year, after which the model was fully redesigned. Have a question? Get an answer from a mechanic now!



Other People Are Reading
How to Tow With a Jeep Liberty
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Engines



Three engines were offered in the first-generation Liberty. The 2.4-liter gasoline powered inline four-cylinder motor produces 150 horsepower and 167 ft-lb of torque. The 2.8-liter four-cylinder diesel motor yields 160 horsepower and 295 ft-lb of torque. The 3.7-liter V-6 gasoline engine produces 210 horsepower and 235 ft-lb of torque.


Towing



The gasoline powered 2.4-liter motor is offered only with a manual gearbox and has a maximum towing capacity of 2,000 lbs. The 2.8-liter diesel engine makes use of its high torque numbers to bring its towing capacity to 5,000 lbs., the same capacity achieved by the 3.7-liter V-6 when mated to an automatic transmission. The manual transmission paired to the V-6 engine yields a 3,500-lb. towing capacity.



Fuel Economy



The gasoline powered 2.4-liter engine is rated between 19 and 21 mpg in the city and 24 to 26 mpg on the highway. The gasoline V-6 is rated between 16 and 18 mpg city and 21 to 22 mpg highway. The diesel powered 2.8-liter engine yields 22 mpg city and 27 mpg highway. These numbers are obviously reduced when hauling a heavy load.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 07:23 pm:

The 2002 Liberty I have is a 3.7 V6 with automatic transmission.

I currently pull a 5x8 single axle enclosed trailer for my reenactment business with a 2 inch ball.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare - Just a little South West . on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 07:46 pm:

Lets see, T's ( CARS not trucks ) come in various weights, the heaviest l think is the fORDOR at about 1900 lbs, followed by the 26/27 Tudor at 1800 lbs, the lighter earlier Tourings come in around 1200 - 1350 lbs. Runabouts/roadsters are lighter again at about 800 lbs- 900 lbs.
My light weight trailer is 600 kgs = about 1250 lbs ( 14' x 6 1/2') total with a touring = just under 2500 lbs.... its probably not the towing that will be the cause of any problems with smaller framed cars, its the braking, does the car/suv/truck have sufficient braking ability to stop the car, the trailer and the load in an emergency situation.
An automatic should be fine with it, if it has a 6 or 7 speed electronic shift, be warned that driving it in manual in 6th is a disaster waiting to happen to your transmission, full auto or 5 th in manual will save you BIG $$$$$$ on a transmission rebuild.
The older 4 speed transmissions should be robust but if 4 th is an over drive, keep it in full auto or tow in 3 rd.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Whaley, Georgetown Ontario Canada on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 08:03 pm:

I think for longevity of the drivetrain, a decent size SUV would work well. I looked at some Yukons with 5.3's in them. Lots of space and will pull a trailer easily. A lot of cars will pull a trailer, but stopping it is another story altogether. Better off buying a little bigger vehicle up front than spending money on transmissions later on.

I ended up buying a bare bones 2004 Silverado long box on the cheap. 5.3 Auto 2wd. Pulls my trailer like a dream.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 08:28 pm:

Erich uses a Che^rolet Silverado. I have a Che^rolet Colorado. My In-line 5 cylinder has to work a little harder on the hills. First brand X I've ever owned.

: ^ )

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare - Just a little South West . on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 08:53 pm:

wow its looks like the Colorado is low at the bar.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 09:02 pm:

From what I understand the Colorado's can come with v8's now.
People have had a bad habit of trying to drive suv's like cars and so the companys had to yank the truck drivetrains and go with independant suspension and such.Which would make the equalizer hitch very much more important.
It urks me that my cadi is 300 hp and all it can do is haul a$$ or grocerys.
Now my dads 95 Roadmaster sedan, that is a Car first class. I wanted 1 and could not find 1. From what I understand from a friend who was a used car dealer, alot of them go overseas. My dad was lucky to get his when he did,as a man from Saudi Arabia called 5 minutes after the deal was made to arrange buying and shipping it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 09:16 pm:

I have a 2011 Ford Explorer. Have had no problem pulling a 24 foot open trailer with a Speedster inside. The trailer has a 2 foot high 2x4 railing all the way around. I also invested in that dohickey that goes inside the car so I can activate the trailer brakes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Langner on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 09:32 pm:

I would avoid the GM Lambda vehicles at ALL costs (Enclave, Acadia, Taverse, Outlook).

I had a new 2009 Saturn Outlook for 2 years, 10 months. I got rid of it after the 19th Service visit. All under warranty, but if anyone thinks the problems were going to magically stop when the warranty expired is braver than me. Google them. Tranny problems, oil consumption, etc.

I have a 2008 Toyota, a 2013 VW, and a new 2014 Honda that have never been back at the dealership for anything but oil changes. But, enjoy your American cars. I used to feel the same way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 09:40 pm:

I have a variety of vehicles--the smallest of which is a Ford Expedition. It'll tow a T anywhere and carry your family comfortably. It's probably not the best choice if you have to commute 100 miles a day!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Sunday, May 11, 2014 - 11:29 pm:

I used to tow mine on an open trailer with a Honda Ridgeline. I hardly knew the trailer was there except that the transmission would hunt gears constantly. Now I have the newest model of the Ford F150. It holds top gear on all but the steepest hills. The key to buying one cheap is to special order one with a regular cab. The regular cab costs a lot less and besides, I wanted a truck, not a bus. It doesn't have to be a base, XL work truck either. You can get the much nicer XLT for not much more. Avoid the stupid and pricey option packages. Just get the XLT with a few options that you really want. Also, special orders don't normally take long nowadays. Your new truck should arrive in a month. Same should apply to Chev or Dodge if that is your taste.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Richard Bennett on Monday, May 12, 2014 - 12:04 am:

I am not familiar with most of the vehicles you fellows have been suggesting. However, a point just mentioned in passing in one post is perhaps the most telling.

Any trailer with your precious T in/on it should have the best braking system available. To me that means electric brakes, with the best controller in the car so that you can dial in the response you need. Depending on the load, you can use the trailer brakes to good effect to augment your vehicle brakes and avoid any pushing from behind by a load trying to overtake you if you get out of line.

Hydraulic brakes on trailers do not suffer intermittent use very well. The fluids get contaminated with moisture, wheel cylinders seize.Over-ride brakes which rely on the trailer pushing you down the road before they work are a disaster waiting to happen.

Your opinions may vary, but I never want to tow again without electric brakes.

Allan from down under.

Bob, for what it's worth, tying a T down on a flat trailer is a much simpler operation if you can run the car up to a stop rail at the front, rather than have to tie it down front and rear.

With the front wheels tied to the bar, all the rear straps have to do is stop the car moving sideways.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare - Just a little South West . on Monday, May 12, 2014 - 02:06 am:

X the ties at the rear to stop any cross slipping during the drive.( cross over the diff - left to right of diff and left, right to left of diff then right- use the diff mass to hold still ).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Monday, May 12, 2014 - 02:33 am:

Flat towing a T means:

No trailer to store 99% of the time, usually outside. Nothing to rot; nothing to steal.

Much safer handling: no fishtailing.

Hundreds of pounds less to pull and stop.

No tongue weight.

Spare vehicle attached.
----------------------------

Required to flat tow a T:

Aux tranny with neutral. . Warfords are more reasonable now with the all the new ones being sold. Even a Layne Warford is a better investment than a heavier towing car you would need to pull a trailer.

Wheel brakes: who doesn't want them anyhow?

No backing up; unhitch for that.

Good tires and running gear. Duh.

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dare - Just a little South West . on Monday, May 12, 2014 - 02:48 am:

are you talking about flat towing as we see RV's pulling around the small Honda size mini SUV with the V bar ??
I like the idea somewhat, but cant get over the fact that you all do it and l think l may have seen only two here... maybe only one.
how do you stop the wheels from going wherever they want whilst towing ??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim on Monday, May 12, 2014 - 06:59 am:

Flat towing = tow bar

In most states - pulling a tow bar requires you pull into all weigh/inspections stations,
which subjects your tow and towed vehicle to potential complete vehicle inspection(s).

Vehicle enforcement = revenue collection.


Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ernie Williams on Monday, May 12, 2014 - 07:31 am:

Ricks-Surf City, could you post a picture of how/where you attach the tow bar to your T?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale L Myers on Monday, May 12, 2014 - 07:48 am:

In 1972 I towed my Model A from Tucson Az. to north west Pa. without any problems.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Monday, May 12, 2014 - 08:07 am:

Towing duty performed by 2006 ford e-250 5.7 I rarely drive this vehicle unless it is raining and I can't drive the M/C to work or I am towing the t to somewhere far away (>150 miles)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Monday, May 12, 2014 - 10:32 am:

The steering will track the same whether it's towed or driven. Towing keeps it going the desired direction. My T also has a shimmy damper.

I made these brackets out of rect tube. I picked up a hole in the frame, and drilled one in the crossmember, each side. I'm sure somebody could come up with a clamp that would not require drilling. Shirley the welder did the towbar out of rect tube.



My towbar was angled down like yours, Dale, the first time out. Every seam and bump on our rotten freeways caused jerking, so I raised the ball to make the towbar level.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison_Rice Minnesota on Monday, May 12, 2014 - 11:01 am:

2008 Chevy Silverado 2500 4X4 with Vortec engine and six speed tranny. 12 miles to the gallon driving in town, out on the open road, towing a trailer or fifth wheel camper or not towing anything I get 12miles to the gallon. The truck has an over abundance of power @ 400 hp and There's nothing like hooking up to something and knowing it'll do the job. As you can tell I don't get overly concerned about mileage because I want to have a comfortable ride and lots of power. But I'd think any of the American SUVs would have the power if you're not going overboard with expectations. Depending on the trailer your towing weight won't be that much. The car will weigh somewhere between 1500 to 2000 lbs. A good fourteen foot trailer will accept a Model T quite well. Good quality nylon jackstraps holds things in place quite well and get a trailer with a end gate that drops down to use as a ramp. I've seen too many people drive model T's off the ramps and bang up their cars because they can't see the ramps and know where they are when backing up. My neighbor recently purchased a Jeep style SUV and fell in love with it. He doesn't tell me what he gets for gas mileage but said it does very well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Harrison,Eatonville,Wa on Monday, May 12, 2014 - 11:32 am:

2008 GMC 2500 Crew Cab 4x4 I can tow just about anything I want and get decent mileage doing it,safe and comfortible.Also get about 21 hiway not towing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Harrison,Eatonville,Wa on Monday, May 12, 2014 - 11:34 am:

Oh forgot to add its a Duramax diesel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Monday, May 12, 2014 - 11:51 am:

I forgot to mention in my post, above about my 83 Suburban, that the first car I ever towed my 16' open trailer with, was a 68 Pontiac Catalina, ordered with a 375 horse, 428 c.i. motor. The trailer's frame is built from used oil derrick steel with 2 .5 inch pipe side rails on front and sides of deck. Don't remember the weight, but it is substantial. I towed the trailer empty from Houston to Colorado Springs and returned loaded with a T. I never realized it was there, aside from having to use the mirrors, more.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Monday, May 12, 2014 - 01:03 pm:

I have towed many cars (maybe over a hundred) with a tow bar. Trailers are a gas wasting pain in the butt.
I lived near two dealer auction sites and would tow cars back to my shop from the auction sites when I would go to work the morning after the auction. About 25 miles each way. Two dealers were less than a block from my shop. The newer cars can no longer be towed with a universal tow bar because of their bumpers so I also used a trailer a lot, as well as for automatic trans cars.
The only two cars I remember that would not track was a '46 Nash Ambassador Ambassador and a Sprite with the rear end higher than the front.
I think you need positive caster to make them follow.
I towed my T speedster with a Warford many times with a Corona wagon and three different Japanese pickups with no problems.
When flat towing it is important that the tow bar attaches to the car at EXACTLY the same distance from the ground as the ball on the tow hitch of the tow vehicle. Keep the tow bar level. Otherwise you will get a jerking action on every little bump.
If a light car, like a T, is being towed that won't follow (track) you can tie the steering wheel straight ahead. That is recommended by some folks on all cars being towed anyway. I do not.
A couple of years ago somebody on this site posted pictures of a T being towed with small, space-saving spare tires on the rear of the T being towed. That will greatly help the tracking problem.
You must also plan to not use the brakes on hard turns like an off-ramp. The towed car will tend to push the towing vehicle's rear to the outside, unless you are towing a T behind a loaded two ton truck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Monday, May 12, 2014 - 11:52 pm:

I probably wouldn't tow a full sized/full bodied T with it but part of the reason I bought a new Subaru Outback this winter is because of the trailer tow rating. 3,000 lbs. That's an aluminum trailer and a speedster with pounds to spare. The all wheel drive does a nice job of handling a trailer and the stiffer suspension of the Outback makes for good handling.

I also have 5 four wheel drive pickups and a bigger truck but they all burn so much gas I can't afford to go anywhere with them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Richard Bennett on Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 09:30 am:

Stan, you might be interested to know of Western Australian who tows his 13 tourer behind a diesel Subaru Forester. Thats the smaller Subaru which usually has a 2.5 litre petrol motor.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house on Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 09:33 am:

Get a rear wheel drive, whatever you buy. When my '98 Explorer wore out I was shocked to hear Ford went to front wheel drive in '11 so I bought a gently used '10 Explorer. Guess I'll get an Expedition when this one wears out. That said, a man from NC who recently bought my '25 TT picked it up with an old small GMC 'Jimmy'. Scared me to death. I almost bought a life insurance policy on him with me as beneficiary. By all means, buy something large enough to not fishtail when emergency braking. An open trailer is just an intermediate step to a closed trailer anyway. Might as well skip that step in the first place.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 10:23 am:

I agree with George on that rear wheel drive OR a full time all wheel drive, which more and more cars and a few pickups have. I wouldn't pull much of a trailer with a front wheel drive. Maybe a little one to haul the beer to a car show or something but not a car behind one.

Alan, that's interesting about the diesel Forester. They don't sell those here. The Forester is pretty popular here but the Outback is the number one selling car in Montana. It outsells everything but Ford F-150 pickups and outsells every other car. I haven't pulled anything very heavy behind mine, maybe 800 lbs on a little trailer to Chickasha and back but it would handle a heavier one for sure. I wanted something that would pull a small motorcycle trailer, I have a Suzuki CT50C, which is an 805 cc small cruiser. Probably weighs 700 lbs + the trailer which probably weighs 300 or so. I think it will handle it just fine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 10:54 am:

Bob, it really depends on the trailer that you select. A'15 Touring is light enough that you can haul it on a single axle utility trailer. That does leave the option open for some cars as tow vehicles. But, if you want to haul it with a greater safety margin, then you'll want a tandem axle car trailer. This means you'll need a well equipped mid sized SUV or full size truck. I'm sure you'll get widely varied opinions in this subject. But, as a former heavy equipment driver with over a million safe miles behind me, I assure you that only a fool would believe that he can safely pull a tandem axle car trailer with a modern car. If you opt for an enclosed trailer, you'll need a full sized pickup or SUV.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 11:35 am:

I have little towing experience so while i read all of this thread i have said nothing.What i did learn was one fellow got such good millage towing with his diesel car i think i will buy one.I think that car would be to lite to haul good but at the millage claimed it must make fuel so i would keep draining off the excess and use it in the old F-250!! The 36' Jayco is about loaded! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 01:42 pm:

Bud - How about a Dodge Ram pickup with Cummins diesel? As you say, great fuel mileage, and you won't find any vehicle more suited to towing than that! Extended cab too if you want, so just as much seating as any sedan. Seems like a good compromise between comfortable sedan and no-nonsense workhorse type pickup with that diesel you mentioned. And by the way,.....my "opinion" of course, but I don't think there's a better diesel built than that Cummins,.....FWIW,......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 01:57 pm:

I have become a big fan of the older ('90's) Land Rover Discovery. They are now cheap to buy and can be found with low miles. They have a reputation for being a "gas hog" but that can be remedied quite well by getting the computer reprogramed. I got a considerable torque/power boost along with considerably better fuel economy.
They are easy to work on and parts can be bought online reasonably. They can easily pull 3000#. The all wheel drive and short wheel base can come in handy.
Of course recently I bought a '81 F150 with only 80,000 miles on it. This was a "full load" Ranger lariat with AC cruise tilt PW PDL super cab long box (155" wb) (and it all works). I have changed the cam timing to get more torque and will probably convert it to efi


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 04:01 pm:

Harold,I stayed away from the Duramax because of the alum and i think the Ford now has alum heads?? If the Cummings is still iron it will be my choice.6 passenger crew cab and the ability to haul 15,000.Bud.PS,The last post was a joke about claimed mileage.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob on Texas Gulf Coast on Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 09:54 pm:

A more unique tow rig. Taken last month in Texas.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 10:04 pm:

It is all about having the proper horsepower.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black on Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 10:09 pm:

OK Bob,
You haven't said anything since your original post, so, I went back and re-read it. If you think 18/23 mpg is bad, you may as well stop looking for a daily driver that will also tow. You got it right initially--you need an economical daily driver and another tow vehicle. I'm biased toward diesels. Get you a good used one and it will last you almost forever. I have a 3/4 ton Ford, and a 1 ton Dodge, but, the best tow vehicle of all time is my diesel pusher motor home. You can spend anything from a little more than the cost of an open trailer, to more than the cost of your house.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 10:36 pm:

I've had my fill of trailers. They're evil beasts of burden out to bite your ass, like this one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 12:43 am:

O.K.


So since we are headed down THAT road ... :-)



Jim



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