Timer-26

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Timer-26
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john hardiman on Monday, May 12, 2014 - 08:53 pm:

Have original timer case. Need to mill a new fibre base and contact points. Am looking for drawings with dimension, ie: blue prints.

Also, looking for a used fibre gear if anyone has one.

I noticed a similar thread down a ways. Any definitive answers as to what the fibre gear was made of and its equivalence today.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, May 12, 2014 - 09:29 pm:

For the net return doing 1 timer, sounds like a lot of work and money but maybe this will get you started;
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/266051.html?1328849034
By the way, there were timers that have a Bakelite ring that might fit your into timer case.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, May 12, 2014 - 09:31 pm:

Unclear. The stock Ford timer has no gear. Just a case and a roller. Pictures?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd on Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 10:23 am:

"Also, looking for a used fibre gear if anyone has one."

Methinks that he's looking for a camshaft gear.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown on Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 10:30 am:

John, If you are talking about using a fiber cam gear, I would highly recommend not to use one. They may be OK on a engine with no generator, but they are no good on a engine with a generator. The generator gear will tear up the fiber and make a huge mess in you engine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 12:12 pm:

Well, if that's what he wants I'm willing to let this one go real cheap. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel D. Chicoine, MD, Pierre, SD on Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 02:04 pm:

Steve, I think if you turn it around, there's still a lot of miles on it. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john hardiman on Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 08:41 pm:

What I am looking for is:

1. Drawings (blueprints) of fibre bed and contact points in side the cone of the timer. Need exact measurements from original. Have been looking at patent office and ford archives with no success. Maybe someone has blueprints of what I am looking for.

2. I would like to know what the fibre bed was made of.

3. I would like to know what I can make a fibre bed out of today-----I heard you can use a fibre cam timing gear and mill one out of that. There must something to make this out of which can take the heat, oil etc...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 09:03 pm:

Linen base Phenolic would be a good start.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 12:40 am:

I happen to be restoring several marginal timers almost as we speak. I am sure that there are better modern alternatives. Most vintage timers have insulators made out of either something akin to Bakelite (Tiger and Milwaukee both used that) or (are you ready for this?) PAPER that appears to have been soaked in something (maybe shellac), pressed and baked (original Ford and others used this). These tend to warp and break with age, however seem to be tougher than the Bakelite and wear better. Interestingly, Milwaukee made many different timers, some of which used paper and some used paper embedded into the Bakelite. As to dimensions. There are no specific dimensions common to many timers of different manufacturers. I have several timers that look very similar, however, close comparison shows the dimensions are different enough that many of the parts are not interchangeable. Even the main insulator itself varies by as much as nearly 1/4 inch diameter. The diameter on the timing gear cover is consistent from about 1912 until the end of production in 1927. However, the thickness of the timer housing varies a lot. Some of them also "bell" down smaller, and a few "bell" out larger. One of the timers I took apart this past weekend had a thick paper shim all the way around the insulator. Even so, it had shrunk and was loose. I have epoxy glued insulators before, and am doing so again. I am considering using epoxy soaked into a thick paper shim to improve the fit. I am also considering cloth and epoxy. I would appreciate hearing opinions on that.

John H, I would recommend getting a rebuildable timer to begin with and making new pieces as required to fit. They are usually fairly cheap on eBad, although I don't buy them there. I either want to see them up close before I buy them, or they have to be really cheap. The difference between one worth $2 and one worth $40 often doesn't show in photos.

Or, perhaps, you are planning to manufacture them for the hobby? That could be nice if you are going to provide truly correct timers. Functionally good timers are readily available already for a reasonable price.

Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


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