Guess what year Model T is under the grass of South Dakota

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Guess what year Model T is under the grass of South Dakota
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 12:18 am:

For a change - I picked up a vehicle of my own today in South Dakota ... :-)

This Model T was bought new by the family after 1908 and was' put to pasture ' in the family farm
boneyard many years ago ....

Any guess on the year ?


Jim



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 12:20 am:

There is a full frame under the grass ... :-)


Jim






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 12:23 am:

Last one ... :-)



Jim



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 12:23 am:

'15 or '16.

Looks like a good start.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 12:29 am:

1915, or 16.

If you had a close up of the windshield frame would be better, but it looks like a 1915, if the windshield frame is riveted.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 12:33 am:

Check out the wagon .... :-)




Jim






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill in Adelaida Calif on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 12:42 am:

I was going to guess 15 1/2. How do plan to get it home? :-)

Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 12:45 am:

Bill,

It is still there ....

I am 250 miles away ....

I left today with this ..... :-)



Jim



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 01:26 am:

Jim:
Its a 15 or 16, YOU SHOULD TRY AND SAVE IT!!!!!

picture


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale Peterson on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 01:42 am:

Side rivet, metal front seat frame, riveted lower windshield. My vote is 16.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Henrichs on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 01:52 am:

I agree with Dale: 1916 for the same reasons.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 07:19 am:

Well ...

I will return someday to claim it I suppose.

But it will be with an open trailer ... :-)


There are (2) 1950 Plymouth 4 door cars I might
also pick up at the same time ...

This is a designated ' Centennial Farm ' that was homesteaded back in 1907 .... :-)


Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eubanks, Powell, TN on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 07:31 am:

Is that a Delco light plant in the background?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 08:15 am:

Jim,

Are you talking about in this picture ?



He mentioned a 32 volt DC ? I believe kerosene ?
run generator that they used to light the homestead cabin they grew up in that was in the basement along with the batteries ....

Does it have value ?


Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 09:20 am:

Did the rear or back seat section come with the car? Didn't the rear section metal back seat ribs (3) come with the 1919 and on Tourings? I just got through restoring a 21 Touring and it has the metal ribs in it like the ones on the back section in the pic.
Dave in Colorado: Your knowledgeable about the earlier Tourings, didn't the earlier Tourings have wooden ribs in the back seat instead of metal? And of course I could be wrong.

Just curious and the body is still pretty decent considering its been outside all these years!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 09:26 am:

Jim, since the T is a one family T since it was new I would try to restore or at least keep it.

There aren't many one family T's around and I would try to restore it if possible.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 09:54 am:

The remains of the T are from a '15 or '16. I don't think you can be more specific than that. The most obvious features are the hood former, which was used only in '15 & '16, and the riveted lower windshield frame, ditto. The other things mentioned above, such as the side carriage bolt and metal seat frame, varied by body manufacturer as well as by years.

Or maybe I'm all wet. Hap has been collecting info on these bodies for many years. He probably can nail it down if anyone can.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 10:08 am:

O.K ......

I will add it to my list of what I need to
pick up on my next trip ..... :-)

It is just hard to get there ....

I had to travel from Denver, CO this time.

The Model T is what you see pictured,
nothing has been added - it just broke down
over the years into what you see there now ....



Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthonie Boer on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 11:23 am:

That combine , is that a Massey Harris 726
Toon


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim on Thursday, May 15, 2014 - 05:52 am:

Anthonie,

I could not tell you ...

I am not a farm equipment guy.



Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, May 15, 2014 - 12:01 pm:

Jim,
You wrote; "He mentioned a 32 volt DC ? I believe kerosene ?
run generator that they used to light the homestead cabin they grew up in that was in the basement along with the batteries ....

Does it have value ?"
YES!!
The back half of the T body is where it is because it's only held to the front part by the wood sub frame---it looks at least as good as my '16 did when I got it (except I got the entire engine and drive train too). Looking about, the other parts might be there, under a homemade trailer or other farm piece---unless they went for a scrap drive or to fix someone else's T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike on Thursday, May 15, 2014 - 01:55 pm:

That motor that is just off to your left in the photo is what caught my eye. I wonder if that's what was powering his generator. I'd be drooling all over it if I had the chance!!!
Mike Sa


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Thursday, May 15, 2014 - 02:25 pm:

It looks like part of a Delco 32 Volt light plant. They used to be all over this country -- before REA brought power to the farms and ranches. I doubt that it ran on kerosene, tho.

For those of you who are younger and didn't grow up in a rural area, 32 Volt DC was pretty common. In someplace where they wouldn't freeze, maybe the root cellar, there was a bank of batteries - glass jars about a foot square and 18 inches tall with a glass or wooden top on them. (they probably all had glass tops when they were new) From that top hung two good sized lead plates. The jar was full of "Battery Acid" a mixture of Sulfuric acid and water. Same as most car batteries. They were two volt storage cells. Sixteen of them made the bank of batteries that provided 32 Volt electricity to the farm. The generator or a wind charger charged the batteries and an automatic system started the generator when they were drawn down to a certain point. There was a separate 6 volt battery that started it on some systems, some started with the 32 Volt dynamo used to charge the batteries.

There are still 32 Volt bulbs and many appliances available for those systems and some rural areas still use the system. It was not maintenance free nor particularly economical. The generator burned a lot of fuel, the batteries had to have maintenance and the lead had to be replaced regularly. Companies that sold them had crews or at least a guy who went out to the farms and serviced the systems. One advantage of them for farms was that you could tap three cells and get 6 volt power to charge car batteries, etc.

6 Volt systems were also pretty popular, most of those were small wind chargers but many ran on small engines and charged a bank of 6 volt batteries. They used automobile type batteries and were mainly used for light. One of our neighbors had a 6 volt lighting system home made from a car generator and a "washing machine motor" when I was a kid, they had head lights from old cars in the living room and kitchen as I recall and one in the barn. I don't think they ever did have 110 volt service from REA. I wish I had a picture of their living room with that light hanging down over the table.

Later on when 110 Volt AC became more available many companies made 110 generators and sold them to rural farmers. They were much better than the 32 volts systems as they did not require batteries. They self regulated somehow but if you turned on too many lights they would all dim, etc. I worked for a farmer when I was a kid in grade school that had a 110 system with a Jacobs Windcharger and a gas generator and when the wind wasn't blowing to make electricity for the milking machines we had to milk by hand because he would not start the generator and waste gas just to milk a dozen cows.

For those of you who read Herman & Freida, when Einar is coming back home from taking Torvald from the coal mine explosion to town so they can take him to the Dr in Miles City, he parks on top of the hill and sees the bright lights come on in the house at home from several miles away he knows they have the generator running. (He would not have been able to see it with only kerosene lights) Either Emmaline has gone down to the basement and started the generator or somebody has come to help her -- but either way she knows they are safe and waiting for him.

(I've always been surprised at how few comments I got on that book about the technology of the day that I wrote about. The light plant and the bright electric lights being one of them)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Thursday, May 15, 2014 - 03:07 pm:

Is it as solid as it looks in the pics? Hard to believe sitting outside so long.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, May 15, 2014 - 04:39 pm:

One reason 32VDC was used was that Railroads used 32VDC for all their electrical lighting (Locomotives, passenger cars) so bulbs were readily available, as were generator parts (Locomotives used steam to power their generators, but the generator part was easily adaptable to other sources of spinin').


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim on Thursday, May 15, 2014 - 08:49 pm:

The thing I like about this forum ....

You never know where a thread will head to ...

Or what you will learn along the way ...

Everyone who posted here along with everyone
who posts every day on all the other threads ...


THANK YOU !


Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Friday, May 16, 2014 - 10:14 am:

Thanks, Jim, nice to know that somebody actually reads some of the posts on here and finds them interesting.

For those of you who actually have an interest in the United States west, this is an interesting web site showing probably a hundred abandoned or close to abandoned towns in North Dakota. Many are remnants of the homestead boom; over time they just petered out as there was less and less demand for the services they provided. As machinery improved in the 30's and 40's, it became much easier to farm larger and larger tracts of land and many of the original homesteads from the teens were bought out by younger farmers assembling a larger farm. As transportation improved in the 30's it became easier to travel to bigger towns with more shopping and lower prices and the small town merchants got left behind. Several wars took the young men away, many never returned at all and many didn't come back to the farm if they came back from the war. Many the farmer and his wife worked all their life to provide their children with an education so they would not have to stay on the farm. I always find the photos of the large, well built schools interesting in these little farm towns. The people taxed themselves to build a school to educate their children so they could leave and never return to the farm and the small town they came from. But what really did in the small towns was the pill in the 1960's. Families no longer had 8 or 10 children, they had 2 or 3 or 4. They pretty much all went to college, they pretty much didn't come back.

http://www.ghostsofnorthdakota.com/


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