Australian 1911 Smith & Waddington

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Australian 1911 Smith & Waddington
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 10:27 am:

1911 Smith & Waddington Town Car for sale:

http://www.justauto.com.au/justcars/cars-for-sale/1911-FORD-MODEL-T-JCM3507037?b ackurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.justauto.com.au%2Fjustcars%2Fcars-category%2Fvintage-car s-for-sale%2F&backtext=Back+to+results


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 10:34 am:

1 AUD = 0.93 USD


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 12:19 pm:

As well as luxurious car bodies, Smith & Waddington tapped into the lucrative bus body building market in the 1920s spurred on by the increased public transport requirements from Sydney's growing population which had almost doubled since 1901. Many ex-servicemen experienced in driving and maintaining motor vehicles during the War, set up local bus runs. Up to the 1920s most of Sydney's buses had been imported from America so Smith & Waddington were one of the first local companies to begin bus body work. By 1925 they were making 60 small, single-deck bus bodies over a 4-month period. Photographs of their bus bodies are included in this collection of photographs and album which clearly illustrate the fashions, methods of production and motor body building industry at the time.

The Great Depression of 1929 put an end to Smith & Waddington's luxury car body production and the firm went into liquidation, re-emerging as the Waddington Body Co. Ltd, eventually making double-deck bus bodies for the New South Wales Department of Road Transport and Tramways from 1935 and rail buses from 1936. The firm moved to Granville in 1937, was taken over by the Federal Government during the Second World War to make aircraft hangars and freight wagons, became Commonwealth Engineering Co. Ltd in 1946 and COMENG from 1963. They made buses and railway wagons and passenger vehicles for transport operators all over Australia until its closure in 1989.

The firm Smith & Waddington Ltd was established at Parramatta Road, in the inner-Sydney suburb of Camperdown in 1921 by Frank Waddington, Arthur Spurway Smith and Charles Leslie Fairs. The latter two previously worked as master coachbuilders for May Bros Body Builders Ltd. The body designer, Arthur Smith, who trained in Omaru, New Zealand, with John Cunningham, also joined the partnership and was responsible for the design of the elegant and luxury custom-made car bodies built by Smith & Waddington for imported chassis including Rolls-Royce Ltd, Wolseley, Hudson, Dort, Essex and Benz. During the 1920s Rolls-Royce bodies made a large proportion of the companies' work and it was said that in 1923 some 85% of all Rolls-Royce cars in Australia had Smith & Waddington bodies. The 1925 Rolls-Royce Twenty in the Museum's collection (object No. B1339) has a body made by Smith & Waddington.

By 1923 the Smith & Waddington factory employed 150 workers and by the following year the factory had expanded into 11 buildings along Parramatta Road. The cars were constructed of a composite timber frame, especially seasoned on site to prevent shrinkage from drying out, a problem in the dry Australian climate. The exterior metal panels were hand beaten on the shop floor from the best imported steel, glass was imported and mostly Australian-made leather used. Skilled artisans took great pride in manufacturing the car bodies which involved separate wood workers, metal workers, electro-platers, upholsterers and painters.

The increasing mechanisation by the large firms such as E.W. Holden's works at Woodville, South Australia, meant that Smith & Waddington were less able to compete in the standard car body market so there was more emphasis on the manufacture of bus bodies for local bus runs as well as touring cars with extended bodies, known as charabancs. These were used to take tourists to the Jenolan Caves and Royal National Park. One such car was 15-passenger White charabanc owned and operated by N.L. Day of Coogee.

The original Smith & Waddington factory buildings along Parramatta Road were demolished in about 1926 and a new multi-storey steel and concrete one was built at 45-61 Parramatta Road. Production here saw the chassis lined up on the top floor of the building and these were progressively moved down each floor in hydraulic lifts, as work was completed on them. This was said to be ahead of the usual construction methods of the time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 08:11 pm:

Constantine,
It appears that you have gotten this information from a museum site. Although mostly correct is also on a number of points wrong,

First of all as your post shows the Town Car is not a Smith and Waddington bodied vehicle as noted in your history of Smith and Waddington were not established until 1921. ten years before when Arthur Smith was still in school.

The town car was built some time after 1973, from memory around 1985. Obviously at some stage a Smith and Waddington body tag has been attached to the car. I can't say for sure which car this one is but I suspect its Alan Payne's from Parkes NSW who built a Town Car though maybe someone does know exactly this ones history.

Sorry to jump in on this but all too often stories appear and new history is invented because of information put on line. My interest in Smith and Waddington has been aroused as my father worked for Arthur Smith as manager of his Smash Repair business in Mascot Sydney in thee 1950-60's and as a child I spent many hours in the shop with Arthur Smith. When as a teenager I became interested in old cars and found my first one a 1911 Armstrong Whitworth I visited with Arthur who had then retired and he gave me some background which helped me in restoring cars.

Here is a picture of the new Parramatta Road building, it was this structure that bankrupted S&W. It 's cost and the falling business led to Arthur and the shareholders to be declared bankrupt in 1927.

S&W

If you wish to learn more contact me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kerry van Ekeren (Australia) on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 08:21 pm:

A fellow Victorian club member thought it was built by David Dryden in the 80's, possible?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Watson -Florence,Colorado on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 10:00 pm:

Peter,
You are correct,this is Not a Smith & Waddington Bodied Vehicle.
Alan Payne built this car up from a Rusted out Farm Wreck from a Town Called Yarrabandai in NSW
All there was,was a Chassis,Motor,Differential and one Running Board and Rusted out Front Fenders and a Truck Conversion Kit on the Back.
Alan used photos and drawings of Paul Antonucci's Towncar in Pittsburg.These were loaned to him by Bill Brand from Victoria who had been to America. Alan also fitted a Chilcott Magneto which he said did away with the Coils. (see ABOUT TOWN Issue #12)We think that Alan did a magnificent job all things considered
-Don


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kerry van Ekeren (Australia) on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 11:21 pm:

Thought I had seen it for sale one other time, March 2008, Melbourne ph# that time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 11:38 pm:

Peter,

Yes, info I posted about Smith & Waddington was taken from a museum website. I also noticed that the company did not exist in 1911 but thought perhaps it was bodied but another company or individuals that later formed Smith & Waddington.

Small world that you knew Mr. Smith.

In the ad seller writes "Built by coach builders Smith & Waddington of Sydney". I guess they knows less about Smith & Waddington than I do? Or...

Wonder if the chassis, motor, differential mentioned by Don were at least from a Town Car bodied T? Probably not I guess.


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