Brake hone, parts washer and a good fit

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Brake hone, parts washer and a good fit
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Moorehead on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 04:04 pm:

I was working on transmission drum bronze or brass bushing replacements and did not have a reamer big enough. I used a brake hone while holding the part under the flow of the parts washer for cooling and lube. I used a variable speed hand drill and basically used the hone like I would when honing engine cylinders. I checked the fit numerous times during the process and wound up with a very good fit and very smooth bore. I have everything buttoned up and the transmission is very smooth.
My question is, is this an acceptable practice or will I be doing it again? Sure seemed like a good idea and the results seem to be satisfactory. I would do it again this way unless someone tells me different.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Scott Owens on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 04:18 pm:

Tom, You may get some belling of the bore if you pull-push the honing stones to far out of the bore. if the center pivot of the stones stays inside of the bore you should be fine. Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 05:20 pm:

The problem with that method is that there is no guarantee that the inner face of the finished bushing is parallel with the outer face of the drum.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 06:10 pm:

It's not the correct method, but many have used it with good enough results. Balancing the drum may be more important than having the inner face parallel with the outer face to the last thousand of an inch?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 09:18 pm:

Beats the heck out of a corn cob with sand paper wrapped around it! If running smooth I would not worry. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren W. Mortensen on Thursday, May 15, 2014 - 12:04 am:

Been there, done that, car still works.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Thursday, May 15, 2014 - 12:23 am:

If everything on Model T's was balanced and within a thousandth I doubt they'd run at all........


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Art Wilson on Thursday, May 15, 2014 - 12:31 am:

If the hole in the bushing is not round to begin with the brake hone will not make it round. I learned this the hard way. One possible way to minimize the out of round is to hone the bushing just enough to get it started on the shaft and finish it up with yellow Time Saver compound.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, May 15, 2014 - 01:31 am:

Fit, measure, cut. Fit, measure, cut. Repeat. Repeat. Repeat.
That was how many of these things were done a hundred years ago. And most people would be shocked to find out how much can be done that way now. And how well it can work.
I fit wrist pin bushings with a brake cylinder hone once. Yes. I know that it won't line them up like the correct reamer would. If the holes in the pistons had been off, that would have been a problem. That is why I checked them. And checked them. And checked them.
I also once fit spindle bushings the hard way. Hey, if you ain't got the right tools? The first time I drove it, they were a bit too tight. 20,000 miles later, they were still tight, just right tight.

Tom M, What you did sounds good to me. There is a best way to do things. Sometimes it is just not practical to do it that way. But it can still be done right.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave DeYoung ......... Stoughton, WI on Thursday, May 15, 2014 - 08:50 am:

What clearance dimension were you shooting for. Loose is better than tight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Berg on Thursday, May 15, 2014 - 12:24 pm:

I did the same thing with my replacement low speed drum. Cylinder hone (not brake) and cutting oil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Thursday, May 15, 2014 - 12:48 pm:

I did the one in my truck like Art said above. Honed it until I could barely get it together then finished it up with yellow Timesaver. Works just fine after many years. There's way too many people out there that think Model T's have to built to the specs and tolerances of an Indy car. It just ain't so.

I do like the idea of honing under the parts washer. Wish I had thought of that. I used a jar of mineral spirits and just stopped every minute or so to wash off the hone. Doing it under the parts washer sounds way better. Funny thing is, I was using the parts washer with the lid closed as a work bench and still didn't think of that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Moorehead on Thursday, May 15, 2014 - 05:48 pm:

I can't take credit for the parts washer part. One of the guys I have a high respect for in Ohio suggested I do it that way. If he had not suggested it, I would be doing the dip in the can trick. I wish I had thought about the time saver. That would have really slicked it up. But the hone did well and the finished bore was bright and shiney.
Thanks to all for the comments. I do appreciate this forum and what I have learned from it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Thursday, May 15, 2014 - 06:26 pm:

One trick I have borrowed am no going to buy. You can get a unit that's not to expensive that plugs into your PC it allows you to see with about 200 power parts important as triple gear finish on the pin or the bushing.
lapping finish is like sanding wood the finish is smoother then can be done with a powered tool like a lathe or a boring bar in a lathe.
Timesaver yellow works good on bronze bushings.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Friday, May 16, 2014 - 10:57 am:

Get or find a Sunnen Hone, any good auto machine shop will have one. Dan


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