OT - The Monster is Stirring The Rebirth of a 1729 Cubic Inch Iconic Racing Car

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: OT - The Monster is Stirring The Rebirth of a 1729 Cubic Inch Iconic Racing Car
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Greenlees on Tuesday, June 03, 2014 - 06:33 am:



The Monster is Stirring The Rebirth of a 1729 Cubic Inch S76 Fiat: Soon vintage car enthusiasts from around the world will be able to witness the sight
and sound not heard for close to 100 years at the Goodwood Festival of Speed later this month - The fire-breathing 290 h.p. Fiat will run again. Learn
the story of this icon @ http://theoldmotor.com/?p=121365


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Greenlees on Tuesday, June 03, 2014 - 06:35 am:




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Tuesday, June 03, 2014 - 07:58 am:

Monster is right! That thing is massive. Lol


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Kuhnash Southeastern Ohio on Tuesday, June 03, 2014 - 10:39 am:

This Fiat was at Hershey in 2012. Huge car, mant people around all the time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Greenlees on Tuesday, June 03, 2014 - 12:45 pm:

The #41 car is owed by a friend of mine, George Wingard and is 1911 Fiat S74, which had a 14 litre 4 cylinder engine and was used here in the U.S. and the rest of the world for races at the time.

1729 Cubic Inch S76 Fiat engine shown in the first post was a Land Speed Record car and the engine was TWICE the size at 28 litres with a 7.480" X 9.842" bore and stoke.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Tuesday, June 03, 2014 - 01:49 pm:

What is neat about the photo is that it shows the car up on blocks being worked on nearly 100 years ago and again today.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Tuesday, June 03, 2014 - 03:40 pm:

David,

Any pics of the engine or its internals?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker on Tuesday, June 03, 2014 - 04:00 pm:

They are huge, but from the pictures, the car being restored is not the same car as the third picture down, from the oldmotor.com. Notice the position of the chain wheel, on the car being restored it is in the middle of the driver cockpit while the old motor picture it is much closer to the front of the car.
Just an observation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Tuesday, June 03, 2014 - 04:05 pm:

Tony,

The sprocket in the first pic is the one on the wheel hub, while the sprocket in the 3rd pic is that of the drive axle.

I will say that the wheel sprocket & brake drum looks way larger in the 3rd photo. But I guess sprocket drive ratios were the type of things that constantly got changed from race to race.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Greenlees on Tuesday, June 03, 2014 - 04:58 pm:

Any pics of the engine or its internals?

Jerry, there are plenty on our website @ http://theoldmotor.com/?p=121365


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Greenlees on Wednesday, June 04, 2014 - 12:07 pm:



Many of you have asked me for a size reference, to give you a better
idea of the size of things here is Duncan Pittaway the owner with one
of the connecting rods.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Wednesday, June 04, 2014 - 01:26 pm:

Thanks David. Excellent!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Wednesday, June 04, 2014 - 01:36 pm:

LOL it doesn't look like a connecting rod. It looks like an oversized prop for kids to play with. I bet it weighs a ton. If J&M Machine checks this thread: which is easier to balance - something brutish and heavy like that connecting rod and the correspondingly huge rotating components? Or, something smaller and daintier than a T engine? (don't have a good example). Just wondering if there's any appreciable difference or it's just a matter of whether or not it fits on the balancing machine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Greenlees on Wednesday, June 04, 2014 - 03:00 pm:

Seth,

I rebuild and balance all sizes of early engines here in our shop and it really is not any harder to do something big like this, other than having to deal w/the actual weight of lifting the parts.

As you probably know, both ends of the rods the get weighed and equalized and then the overall weight of the complete rod is then checked. In this case you may only need a larger scale for the rods.

I have babbitted, bored and balanced a similar sized set of antique Cat Bulldozer rods that were 19-inches c to c and it really was not all the hard to do. I am 6'-1" and the crank when standing upright came to the bottom of my chin.


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