Diff.erential Temp?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Diff.erential Temp?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pat Kelly on Friday, June 06, 2014 - 10:38 am:

I changed the oil in my 26 T differential (600w) and took a short 10 mile drive. When I got home I felt the diff. housing and it was pretty warm but not hot. The inner bearing area was just warm. The outer bearings were cool. What kind of temp. should I expect to feel? Thanks, PK.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Friday, June 06, 2014 - 12:04 pm:

Pat

Would be normal if warm on the passenger side after a run, but most of the heat is transfer from exhaust! It can warm the pumpkin like a wood stove.... :-)





Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Scott Owens on Friday, June 06, 2014 - 12:26 pm:

Go touch the pumpkin of your passenger car after a drive. It will burn your fingers. The gear auction, the bearing loads and the frothing of the oil will make for lots of hear. Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Friday, June 06, 2014 - 12:36 pm:

On our 17 touring, the differential housing gets warm but not hot - the rear end has been rebuilt but has fairly low mileage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Friday, June 06, 2014 - 12:42 pm:

Warm would be normal just from friction of gears and bearings. Reviewing online post from a Google search indicated that up to about 200F would not be out of line for a modern differential under load.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pat Kelly on Friday, June 06, 2014 - 02:55 pm:

Thanks for the info. Sounds like all is good. Putting that 600W in is quite a chore. That stuff sticks to everything! Thanks again, PK.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George_Cherry Hill NJ on Friday, June 06, 2014 - 06:14 pm:

Scott....using a 'smart phone' eh?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Friday, June 06, 2014 - 07:12 pm:

Here's a "rule of thumb" that someone passed on to me years ago. If you can hold your hand on an object for no longer than 5 seconds, it's approx. 135 degrees. When testing with a digital thermometer it's actually a fairly close method of estimating temperature. I've found that most T differentials fall in that 135 degree zone and that's an acceptable temp., to me at least.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pat Kelly on Friday, June 06, 2014 - 09:00 pm:

I could easily keep my hand on on the pumpkin. PK


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Saturday, June 07, 2014 - 06:18 am:

I use that same rule of thumb, but always heard 130F. Close enough for a rule of thumb.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Saturday, June 07, 2014 - 08:52 am:

Interesting question, where did the wording "rule of thumb" originate from? My father who would be 114 years old had he lived used that saying often. Seeing it here made me wonder of the origin.

just sayin,

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Saturday, June 07, 2014 - 09:33 am:

From what is gleaned off the net... :-)

"The origin of the phrase remains unknown. It is likely that it refers to one of the numerous ways that thumbs have been used to estimate things - judging the alignment or distance of an object by holding the thumb in one's eye-line, the temperature of brews of beer, measurement of an inch from the joint to the nail to the tip, or across the thumb, etc."

Seems probable, ordinary way to judge things, with what you have on (your) hand. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Saturday, June 07, 2014 - 09:43 pm:

In merry old England you could beat your wife with a stick without fear of committing a crime so long as diameter of the stick did not exceed your thumb.
Ah, for the good old days!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole on Saturday, June 07, 2014 - 10:40 pm:

Nope, the rule of thumb is not a permissive spousal abuse policy. Gents, don't try it or you'll be in serious pain, women don't fight fair.
Here's a quick bit of research by Sir Cecil:
http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/2550/does-rule-of-thumb-refer-to-an-old -law-permitting-wife-beating


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Sunday, June 08, 2014 - 10:45 am:

Cecil Adams is fabulous. Been reading his stuff since the 1970's.


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