Ot- you know your sick when...

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Ot- you know your sick when...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tyrone Thomas - Topeka KS on Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 12:19 pm:

you just spent two hours watching the Dr. Phil show rather than working on one of your old cars.
Dr. Phil, I need help!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 12:53 pm:

If it is as hot there as it is here in Florida (mid 90's), I can understand why you'd prefer to watch Dr. Phil in the comfort of the air conditioned house. I cured my sickness by installing an air conditioner in my garage. I also have a TV out there that I can listen to while working on my T's. :-) Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison_Rice Minnesota on Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 01:02 pm:

Jim, I'd like to tell you your cheating but it's an arrangement I've thought of several times but haven't done yet. The last few years haven't brought us too many days above 90 degrees but each summer when those days occur we really feel them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 01:41 pm:

One time I was so sick that I couldn't get up to get the remote to change the channel and watched a golf game!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 01:51 pm:

I'm always amused by how folks who live up on the frozen tundra think 90 is hot. I even hear them gripe in Wisconsin when it gets up to 85. :-)

In this case Tyrone has no excuse. It's 79 here at the south end of the state and probably about the same in Topeka, and without eastern humidity. Time to get it in gear and get some work done.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 01:56 pm:

I installed a 220V electric heater in my garage that I got from Harbor Freight, it works great in the winter.

I have an AC duct and vent in the laundry room, right next to the garage. One of these days I'm going to tap into it and run a short duct with a closeable vent to the garage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 02:42 pm:

I once bought a smoke alarm from Harbor Freight. When I got home the instructions said, "For Best Results Hold Directly Above Flame". hahaha...all kidding aside, I have gotten lucky there a time or two. Still using a Dremel knock-off I bought 15 years ago with no problems.

It'll hit 73 here this weekend and that's fine by me but I don't mind the heat. Lived in the Mojave growing up and still like to make forays out into the Oregon desert each summer.

As for Dr. Phil - Kill Your Television!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 03:49 pm:

Years back a friend of my Son's from school appeared on that show with marital problems. That bozo doesn't solve a blessed thing except how to pay his mortgage on time. It's the only time I ever watched him and was so embarassed for the couple I switched it off.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 04:28 pm:

You sound like a bunch of wimps!

I remember changing the transmission in a 1959 Chev&*# in January during a snow storm with only a tarp as a cover.

Also remember doing it again in April (April showers) with the same trap and water running where we were working.

Did it again in August with the tarp for shade.

Now that I think about it - we changed that darn transmission every few months!



I also walked 5 miles to school uphill (both ways)because the transmission was always broken.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tyrone Thomas - Topeka KS on Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 05:20 pm:

lol Fred. Seems to me,rather than spending so much time fixing the transmission, you would have been better off chasing some sweet young thing with her daddy's car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 05:32 pm:

Hahaha - Good one, Fred.

I did have to change a starter on a 68 GTO convertible in a couple feet of snow in Missouri once. While it was snowing. AT night with a flashlight because I had to be at work on post at "Oh-Dark-Thirty" and when the military says you be there, a bad starter is no excuse for not making formation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison_Rice Minnesota on Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 09:45 pm:

Geez Fred, maybe you should have gotten rid of that damn tarp. Steve I don't care what you say, 90 degrees is too darn hot. I always chuckle when we're at 90 degrees and my sisters, one in Phoenix AZ and the other in McAllen TX are at 114. Then when were at -20 to -30 they're pissin' and moanin' about it being so cold at 60. I have to admit, AIT at Fort Sill OK in July was no picnic. Now that's a God forsaken hell hole.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 09:59 pm:

Yea been way to hot here. I got to hot saterday fetching some cedar logs with the tractor and was sick the rest of the day and sunday.
I have a central air unit outside my shop but my buddy that got it for me has never came back to hook it up. He has the R22 so I cant be picky.
It is a used home unit that worked well but the heat quit and it was replaced. Remove the heat portion and cool my shop easy.
heck if I can get it down from 88 to 77 will suit the heck out of me.My shop is a few degrees cooler than outdoor because 2 sides of it are in the ground 3 feet and it is well insolated.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 11:40 pm:

Tolerance of heat or cold is partly genetic and partly what you're used to. My old house has never had AC. But it's not in town, which means about 5 less, and it's on top of a hill to catch the breeze. During the dog days of July and August when we get to the mid-to-high nineties or more, I lie on the front porch swing in the evening and usually have a pleasant south breeze. Our winters are pretty tame compared to the northern states, but still, by March I'm ready for it to be over because cold weather turns my nose into a snot fountain. That little congenital inconvenience makes me glad my family fled the frozen north and settled here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 12:53 am:

Back in the old days before air conditioning, houses were built to stay cool. My older relatives in Georgia and Florida had such houses. They were built with 12' ceilings so the hot air would rise to the ceiling. The upper sash of the window would be opened a few inches to allow the hot air to flow outside and the lower window sash would be cracked open a few inches to allow cool air from outside to be pulled in by the vacuum created by the escaping hot air. There was a long hallway, called a breezeway going through the center of the house, all the way from the front door to back door which all of the rooms on each side, opened into. The screen doors at the front and back would be opened to allow the breeze to blow through. Each of the doors of each room had a transom over the door which was also opened to allow the hot air to flow out into the breezeway and was taken out by the breeze flowing through the breezeway. Believe it or not, just like the Model T's thermo-siphon system, it worked! Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill dugger on Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 01:00 am:

Steve: That "ROOF" looks great. You did a great job on it. No more tarp on the roof and I would suppose that you could not find it by going on the GOOGLE SITE.

Bill D
Redding Ca.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 09:43 am:

Steve, I'm always amused by folks in the sunny South who think 20 degrees F. is cold!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 09:50 am:

Yeah I can handle it being hot and so humid you might as well be swimming. But man, when it gets down in the twenties and teens, that's crazy. This thin-blooded southern boy prefers the heat any day. I think the folks who live where below 0 is a thing are just flat out nuts. I can't imagine that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 09:56 am:

If you don't have all the crappy weather, you can devote you attention to more important things. A recent forecast for our little portion of Surf City was a high of exactly 70 for the next 7 days, with lows 60-62.

We do have the four seasons: Fire, Flood, Earthquake and Riot.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel D. Chicoine, MD, Pierre, SD on Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 10:02 am:

The Oklahoma summers were too hot for me during residency. The first small lake we found was like sitting in a bathtub! We then found Lake Talequa where we learned to sail Hobie cats. You can always put more clothes on in winter but there is a limit to what you can take off in the summer!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez-Templeton, CA on Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 11:02 am:

I love that "Jelfie selfie". Steve's summer scene makes me long for Kansas...and I've never lived east of Sacramento!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 11:10 am:

Jeez Ralph, when you put it that way, Oregon's looking better by the minute..grin...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 11:12 am:

John, that's part of what brought me here from California. I don't water my lawn. Sometimes it gets a bit parched, but in a normal year there's enough rain to keep the grass green right out to the road all summer. I prefer that to my native state's Mediterranean climate where everything that isn't watered is dead from May to November.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 11:22 am:

And by the way, Ralph's weather observation leads me to recite the southern California weather forecast for all of May and June: "Late night and early morning low clouds and fog, burning off around noon. High 72, low 63." TV weather guys there could just tape the forecast for those months and go on a long vacation. Folks visiting from other parts of the country see those clouds and think it's going to rain. It isn't. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 11:26 am:

Being from Florida (yes I know Native Floridians are rare) I joined the army at 17 and I went North Ft Jackson S.C. Ft Eustis Va then to S.E. asia for about 3 months then the rest of my tour was in Fairbanks AK. I thought it was army intelligence, so I got out then joined the navy that's where I found ships like to go to the artic circle! Dang! what is it with the cold weather thing I hate cold weather so I retired and came back home.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 11:30 am:

Here in Alpine, Ca it is usually cool from after the sun sets till about 8:00 AM. So the windows open at night in the bedroom, and elsewhere when we first get up. Then about 8:00 AM we shut the windows. The house is two story and Dolores and I rarely go upstairs anymore, because our bedroom is downstairs and the children have grown up.

It gets into the 90's outside in the afternoon, but rarely over 80 inside. Our air is dry so don't have a humidity problem. I set the air conditioner for 78, so it only cycles on if it is over 78 inside the first floor. About 8:00 PM the air conditioner goes off and the windows open.

Later in the summer we will have a few days when it's over 100, but most years only about 10 days out of the year.

The coldest it has gotten here since we moved in 40 years ago was +18. Most winters we have a few days when it gets below freezing, maybe into the high 20's but as soon as the sun comes out it warms out usually reaching the high 40's or into the 50's. On some days in January it can be in the 70's during the day but cold at night.

We are inland about 30 miles from the ocean at an elevation of just over 2,000'
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison_Rice Minnesota on Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 06:02 pm:

It's currently 77 degrees outside. The humidity is at 61% and the wind is at 8mph. I have the air conditioner set at 71degrees Fahrenheit and a fan blowing on me. If I get any warmer than it is now, I don't go outside. Of course it doesn't help that I've been sick for the last week but when it's this cool in the house I'm able to sleep. And then I sleep with just a sheet on. I don't like bitter cold any more then the next guy but I have a real problem with hot summer days. In the winter I can dress for the cold. In the summer I can only take a certain amount of clothing off and not be arrested.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 07:46 pm:

I've never once watched more than 30 seconds of Dr. Phil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Friday, June 27, 2014 - 07:31 am:

Who?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Friday, June 27, 2014 - 09:42 am:

Jim - I didn't know about the Southern breezeway!

WoW - We have to be careful we might be confused with one of those educational forums.

In the north a breezeway is a covered area between the house and garage.
It sometimes is enclosed with screens or windows -AKA enclosed breezeway.
It is a place to take off winter coats and boots so you don't track the stuff into the house.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Friday, June 27, 2014 - 10:12 am:

Hi Fred.

I'm not sure if that is the official name for that long hallway, but that is what my elderly relatives called it and it does make sense, since that is the best description for it and its' function. I remember as a child, stepping into the "breezeway" from one of the rooms and feeling a brisk refreshing breeze blowing through the house.

Sort of like what happened to the the buggy whip when the car came along, that long hallway suffered the same fate in modern home construction when air conditioning became a fixture in most modern day houses, but they can still be found in pre A/C homes and Amish houses where modern day appliances are frowned upon.

Jim Patrick


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