Drive Shaft Help

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Drive Shaft Help
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Andulics on Sunday, July 13, 2014 - 12:35 pm:

Do any club members know who makes the current replacement drive shaft? I need a shorter one and would prefer to just contact the manufacturer to see if that's an option with them.
Second choice is, can any club members shorten one for me (the square end). I've lost my access to a machine shop and prefer to have some one familiar with what I'm trying to accomplish and Model T's do the work. You'll be shortening a new replacement drive shaft which I understand in one diameter along it's entire length and would not need the bearing service turned? Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tyrone Thomas - Topeka KS on Sunday, July 13, 2014 - 02:27 pm:

I cut one down once by 6 inches. Used two old drive shafts. Had a machine shop cut the two close to center with the needed extra length. Had the machine shop cut them to be sure the cut ends were squared ends.
Using a length of 2-3 inch angle iron, I secured the two cut shafts into the V, end to end. (grinded a bevel on the ends of the shafts for a deep weld.) Weld in several passes grinding and cleaning between each pass.

I ground down the finish weld. On the outer edge of two angle iron, rounded the shaft back and forth to check for straightness. heat and tweek as needed.

I covered the weld area with a 3/4 ID x 4 inch steel pipe and welded that on. Have to heat the pipe to slide on shaft.

I did this on a car that is still running great. Buck T Special.

As for the drive tube, I took 6 inches out toward the rear end where the tube does not taper. Just just out six inches and welded back together.

I'm working on an idea to legthen a shaft by 12 inches, add a center load bearing. Or a sort of a 12 inch intermediate shaft.

Good luck. Just be sure you have your correct length and that you check for straightness.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Barrett on Sunday, July 13, 2014 - 03:00 pm:

Joe,
We shorten lots of them here. On the new shafts all you need to do is cut the shaft to the proper length and mill the u-joint square on the end. Anyone with a milling machine who knows how to use it can handle the job. On an original shaft you have to machine the bushing surface first. Where are you located? We are in No. Ca.
Erik


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Andulics on Sunday, July 13, 2014 - 04:09 pm:

Thanks for the help, but. I've shortened my share of solid drive shafts and torque tubes. Problem I have today is that I don't have the same access to a milling machine to machine the flats on the shaft as I had in the past. So thus my interest in seeing if I could buy one already shortened by the manufacturer, or a club member who can mill the flats.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tyrone Thomas - Topeka KS on Sunday, July 13, 2014 - 09:30 pm:

Guess you can tell I have a poor boys garage. No milling machine. Just chewing gum and bailing wire. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Webb on Sunday, July 13, 2014 - 10:20 pm:

Felix Graves used to cut off the back end and re machine it and cut a new keyway


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, July 14, 2014 - 03:30 am:

I have an antique crank pin (journal) cutting tool. I cut a drive shaft down once by using the cutter to size it first around the bushing and square end. Then carefully re-measured and began grinding the square with my big bench grinder. Grind slowly and recheck often. Do not let the shaft get too hot (it actually would probably be alright, but hotter metal tears more than it cuts, is hard to handle, and easier to make measuring errors on).

THIS IS NOT A RECOMMENDED METHOD!!!! But it can be done if you are very careful and of limited tools.
Measure often and measure carefully! Check the square for square VERY carefully and often. Final work is using a nice U-joint as a "go no-go gauge" and a sharp, fine, file for final fit.
Again, carefully measure, and drill the U-joint pin hole.
It came out the nicest, smoothest, T U-joint fit I ever put together.
Just a thought.
Good luck!
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Andulics on Monday, July 14, 2014 - 09:07 pm:

Thanks to everyone who posted. Had hoped to find the manufacturer of the currently available driveshaft and bypass the additional machining. I'll order new and find a local shop to machine. Thanks again.


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