Old Photo - Can You Tell These People Are related Or What

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Old Photo - Can You Tell These People Are related Or What
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Monday, July 21, 2014 - 10:05 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Strickling on Monday, July 21, 2014 - 11:26 am:

I think the little girl is a neighbor or adopted.She can almost smile!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Henderson on Monday, July 21, 2014 - 11:28 am:

Jay, I can, their are all wearing the same nose.

Happy motoring,

Warren


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Henderson on Monday, July 21, 2014 - 11:34 am:

Jay, I can, their are all wearing the same nose.

Happy motoring,

Warren


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Monday, July 21, 2014 - 11:40 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Monday, July 21, 2014 - 11:43 am:

LOL hey Tom look again, little girl up front is just crying. And dannnggggg them folks got some serious facial ski slopes! I think it's probably longer than their middle fingers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Monday, July 21, 2014 - 12:10 pm:

Looks to be very cold. Everybody, including the T is all bundled up. I'll bet the cold wind is hitting them in the face, which explains the pained expressions. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Claverie on Monday, July 21, 2014 - 12:36 pm:

I have noticed that in almost every old photo, nobody is smiling.

I asked my grandmother about that once. She told me that having your photo taken was a BIG DEAL back then, almost akin to having an oil portrait done.

She said that due to the long exposure times needed, subjects were told to strike a pose that they could hold for a long time without moving.

They were mostly faced directly into the sun, to shorten the exposure time. Most folks tend to squint, or scowl, when facing the sun. Don't you?

And, "Nobody told us to Smile!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Monday, July 21, 2014 - 04:07 pm:

That "not smiling because of exposure times" stuff is baloney. During the American Civil War, exposure times were about 3 to 5 seconds. That's not a terribly long time.

A couple of in depth studies came to a conclusion that: By the 17th century in Europe it was a well-established fact that the only people who smiled broadly, in life and in art, were the poor, the lewd, the drunk, the innocent, and the entertainment.

The majority of serious artwork of people show no happiness whatsoever. There are EXCEPTIONS to every rule, however: The Mona Lisa.

It has more to do with societies' view of a smile in a portrait, be it either a painting or photograph. They were taken seriously.

In a letter to the Sacramento Daily Union, Mark Twain wrote, A photograph is a most important document, and there is nothing more damning to go down to posterity than a silly, foolish smile caught and fixed forever.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Monday, July 21, 2014 - 04:22 pm:

You will notice they all have a very short distance from the tip of the nose to the upper lip. The little girl's nose has not fully grown, so the space looks a little larger.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darel J. Leipold on Monday, July 21, 2014 - 05:12 pm:

People did not smile when photographs were take at those times. The B&W films used by the common cameras were not as fast as those of latter years. The common hand held cameras might only have a shutter speed of 1/50th of a second. A top line camera could go up to 1/500th or more. I have examples of each. One would use natural light and would ask the subjects to "stand still" when taking the picture. A subject would seldom "hold a smile." The little girl did not know she should not smile.


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