Shocks on T-bay

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Shocks on T-bay
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Thursday, July 24, 2014 - 02:08 pm:

Are these the shocks that have been reported to be dangerous elsewhere on the forum? If not these, then which ones?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Model-T-Ford-Front-After-Market-Shocks-/151358982545?pt= Vintage_Car_Truck_Parts_Accessories&hash=item233db2c991&vxp=mtr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Thursday, July 24, 2014 - 02:11 pm:

Mark those are the dangerous ones, they have the pin riveted that takes the full weight of the car.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/331880/399037.html?1384223387


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel D. Chicoine, MD, Pierre, SD on Thursday, July 24, 2014 - 02:21 pm:

I sent the seller a message. I'll see if there is a response. I owe at least that to Ken!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Thursday, July 24, 2014 - 03:10 pm:

Yep, that is the exact design that contributed to the death of Ken Meeks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland - Trenton, New Jersey on Thursday, July 24, 2014 - 03:33 pm:

That one hole is almost wore through. Not much metal left.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez-Templeton, CA on Thursday, July 24, 2014 - 03:43 pm:

I saw those today as well and thought the same thing. But my good buddy Bill has those front and rear on his '14...So I've been working on him to replace them.

Does anyone have a set of two hole front perches to help him right this wrong? I am also working on an over/under wishbone to strengthen things up front on his Ford.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Thursday, July 24, 2014 - 06:18 pm:

The seller's answer was "thank you"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Phillips on Thursday, July 24, 2014 - 07:28 pm:

I quite like the idea of them - there must be someway of strengthening them to reduce the risk of failure. Looks like those pair spent a long time on a vehicle without breaking.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill in Adelaida Calif on Thursday, July 24, 2014 - 11:52 pm:

Is there only one known failure of these shocks? I'm not trying to negate the possible danger but I am curious as to whether this was a very unfortunate unique event or true design flaw.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Friday, July 25, 2014 - 12:05 am:

Bill. Ken Meeks shock failure may be the only known failure, but do you want to bet your life that they won't fail? Would you take a plane flight that flew over the Eastern Ukraine?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Friday, July 25, 2014 - 12:28 am:

DON'T USE THEM!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Phillips on Friday, July 25, 2014 - 12:37 am:

They look like a good design to me - I would like to know a bit more about failure rates before writing them off . If we were all so worried about safety we wouldn't be driving model T's. There are a lot of things that can fail on a 100 year old vehicle. Have y'all checked ya clevis pins lately. I guess I just don't like being yelled at.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Friday, July 25, 2014 - 01:19 am:

Ken,
Read this complete thread and it will give you details to make your own decision.
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/331880/399037.html?1384223387

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Friday, July 25, 2014 - 09:53 am:

I have used many accessory shocks over the years, Some designs work well, are very stout and well made, and can be quite valuable. Of the dangerous shocks in question, I have seen these exact same type of shocks at swap meets over the years, and they are either cracked around the rivets, or worn so badly that they will soon crack. The design probably was fine when new, matched with other components that were fairly new. But, all it takes is one worn part added to other worn parts and you get a compounded chain reaction. Dealing with the front end is no game. If it comes apart at speed, you will go ass over tea kettle, or in layman's terms you will be pole-vaulted face first into the ground.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, July 25, 2014 - 02:03 pm:

Those shocks are probably fine if you never reach 20 mph on good roads, and bump around potholes at 7 mph or less. At least for awhile.
The weakness in the model T's front end is its stability, or lack thereof. The stability is divided between being held semi-rigid by the wishbone, and in position by the spring. When the short, solid reach of the stock spring perches and shackles is replaced by this "Rube Goldberg" hanging contraption, the only contribution to stability the spring attachment adds is to hold the frame UP.
I have seen model Ts driven with no wishbone. I have moved model Ts with no wishbone (helped push onto trailers a couple times). It is floppy, but do-able. The short, solid perches and shackles do a better job of holding the front end than you may think it would. NOTE; I DO NOT recommend driving a T without a wishbone! That guy was a menace other times as well!
When you throw away the stabilizing contributions of the front spring, the wishbone by itself cannot forever hold the front end in place and stable. Especially not the early style wishbone which is weaker both by position, and by thinner metal than the later ones. I wouldn't even trust the later "under axle" wishbone to that shock setup. The pan and/or ball and socket would eventually give out under the stress of holding it all together by itself.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matthew Atchinson on Friday, July 25, 2014 - 02:16 pm:

My grandfather uses and has sworn by for years his aftermarket hassler shocks: keeps the original T system in place and adds spring based ones on the side. They seem pretty safe and useful.


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