Rear hub nut torque

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Rear hub nut torque
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John P Noonan on Monday, August 11, 2014 - 10:33 pm:

A few months ago i pulled off the rear hubs to install new inner oil seals and re-pack the bearings. I torqued them to about 75 lbs. which seemed pretty tight and after reading some comments from a wise forum member here, decided to check them to see if they had seated after driving. After pulling the pin, they were definitely not as tight as when i first torqued them. But now it seems like getting to the next cutout in the castle nut brings me well over 100+ lbs., is this a problem? I have seen axles break right at the very end of the threaded area, but wasn't sure if this was due to over-torquing. I was thinking about trying different nuts to see if that made a difference, anyone else had this problem?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JohnH on Tuesday, August 12, 2014 - 01:14 am:

There was an unofficial figure of 140 ft. lbs. mentioned some years ago which is what I've always used. 75 ft. lbs. is way too loose. The bar shown in the manual to tighten the hub nuts would easily apply 140 ft. lbs, if not more.
If the notch in the castle doesn't line up try backing the nut off and tightening again a few times. A steel washer can be used if it just won't line up.
It's important to check, as you have done, that the hubs seat on the axle tightly. If you drive around with loose hubs the keyway becomes damaged, as well as both tapered surfaces. I tend to be suspicious of back wheels that can be just lifted off the axle without a puller.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John P Noonan on Tuesday, August 12, 2014 - 01:29 am:

Thanks John for the input, greatly appreciated.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Tuesday, August 12, 2014 - 07:21 am:

John,

There might be as many opinions as what type of oil to use? I like what Bratton's Antique Auto Parts recommends for the Model A rear axle nut that is also the same part as the Model T rear axle nut. They recommend 100 ft lbs. Ref the page before page 1 in their Apr 2001 Price List of Parts.

There is also a great article on torque and nuts and bolts in the "How to Restore Your Model A, Vol 3" that Bratton's refers folks to.

You can also sand or file just a little off the back of the nut.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Tuesday, August 12, 2014 - 09:25 am:

John,

You can lightly grind or file a few thousandths of an inch off the backside of the nut, then try it again. You only have to remove very little material to get the nut to index properly to the cotter pin hole.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Tuesday, August 12, 2014 - 10:06 am:

this one of those confusing things, hap's source says 100 Ft/lbs, someone else says 140, another poster several years ago said 150, Tinkerin Tips say to torque to 75 and then turn until you can get the cotter pin installed.
So who is right, i tried 150# on an older axle and twisted the end of the axle off, the threaded part.

Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Tuesday, August 12, 2014 - 10:13 am:

It may have been OK to tighten the axle nuts to 140 lbs BUT your axle is now 100 years old and I would not trust the threads. I have known of guys over tightening the nuts to much and stripping the threads. I just tighten them snug drive to town and the when I am back home, I pull the hub cap and tighten AT LEAST ONE MORE NOTCH. Do your tightening by FEEL not a torque wrench.

axles


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Tuesday, August 12, 2014 - 10:40 am:

Again, what about the crowd that maintains the hubcap wrench is for that purpose!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, August 12, 2014 - 10:51 am:

I tighten to 100 ft lbs. As I get to about 90, I look for the next slot and stop at that slot. Do not loosen to reach the slot for the pin. If you do loosen it, torque it again and place the pin.
Drive around a bit and check again. Tighten if it needs it.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, August 12, 2014 - 11:11 am:

I am with the take it to 90 and unless a great deal of force is needed, turn to line up next slot. If you need more then 100 to line up next slot, set nut on 600 grit paper on flat surface and take a little off the back.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 - 11:14 am:

I've been using a 15/16 12" long Proto combination wrench for years, and have never paid attention to the torque. I tighten real good and tight, and then go to the cotter pin hole. Never had a problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Robison on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 - 11:59 am:

I regularly torque my rear axle hub threads well above 200 lbs. I always torque to the next hole and never back it off. Only once I have had an axle thread strip. On that axle, I chased the thread to 9/16" and re-torqued and never had a problem with it, in fact I ran that axle for 10+ years and just swapped it this spring. I take a 1 foot breaker bar and torque until I can't do it by hand then I stand on the end, all 240lbs of me and bounce until it basically won't budge. Works every time and my hubs don't wear out. I say if the thread strips, better now because that was a defective part. Typically if the thread strips it is the nut way before the axle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 - 07:51 pm:

The image below is a torque wrench calibration sticker for use on Model Ts. Print it out on label stock and apply it to your bar type torque wench. Works great! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 - 08:17 pm:

Ken

LOL that is great!

Set the HP printer to wallet size and printed that out.

Now my torque wrench is set for the Model T! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 - 08:38 pm:

LOL... No tool box should be without one. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 - 09:02 pm:

I gotta get me one of those !!!!!!!!!!!!


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