Smoking and going through oil

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Smoking and going through oil
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Patrick Mulrooney, Webster, NY on Thursday, August 14, 2014 - 06:43 pm:

It would seem that I have been a bit needy on the forum lately. :-) My 1916 has been going thru oil as of late. 4 quarts within 2 months, maybe 150 miles. I found and corrected a number of leaks, one of which was "fairly" substantial. I found the sight glass on the external oiler was cracked on the backside, but of course that only leaked when the engine was under load. Funny thing is, I never found more than a few obligatory drip marks under the car when it was parked...even for several days. She does smoke a bit when driving. It is most noticeable after idling at a stop sign and then moving on. I have tried several different types of oil. I currently run 15W 40. Could I really be burning that much oil? I do know that I need to replace a couple of rings but would rather wait until winter for that project. I am ok with simply keeping an eye on it and having an ample supply of oil in the car, but just wondered if it is possible that I am "burning" through that much oil driving the car.

Thank you as always!

Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Thursday, August 14, 2014 - 07:18 pm:

Considering oil is rather inexpensive as compared to an engine rebuild, I'd recommend changing out to a straight 30 wt. and see if that doesn't slow down the smoking.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Thursday, August 14, 2014 - 07:38 pm:

Check the rear end. Make sure the oil isn't running down the drive shaft tube into the differential. If you're smoking your burning some but that's a big loss for 150 miles. You'd be killing mosquitoes for miles around if a gallon went out the tail pipe that quickly. Not over filled is it?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Thursday, August 14, 2014 - 08:14 pm:

FWIW I've always been amazed how much oil can be lost due to a bad felt gasket at the front of the hogshead.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Friday, August 15, 2014 - 01:24 am:

Patrick, It's not a big job to pull the head and the inspection cover. Especially if you have a 4 dip pan and remove the pistons then replacing the rings. I recently stopped my oil burning, blue smoking oil burner by simply buying a set of the next over sized piston rings. I gapped them with a small disc grinder put everything back together and Viola! no more oil burning and embarrassing smoke screen take offs from the stop lights.

It's worth a try for the cost of a head gasket and a set of rings.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin in South Africa on Friday, August 15, 2014 - 04:43 am:

Mine did exactly the same as yours Patrick.

Here's what the inside looked like



You definitely could be burning that much oil... Mine "hardly" smoked when driving, but I was told it was a blueish smoke consistently. If I idled at a light for a minute or more, the moment I tried to pull away I was smoking everyone out. Once it cleared, we were back to blueish smoke.

The rings had excessive gaps, although the piston to bore clearance was around 0.006" (cast iron) on all cylinders.

I used Castrol GTX 20w50 before my rebuild, and as I recall, I would run through 3 litres every 500 km's or so. I didn't drive the car all that often, so if it took that much in a year, that was fine with me.

Hope this helps some,
Justin


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Michael Rogers on Friday, August 15, 2014 - 06:23 am:

Oil companies claim, if you lose 1 drop of oil every 10 feet, you will go through a quart in 25 miles. That would be dripping or smoking.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Friday, August 15, 2014 - 07:14 am:

I think a compression test would be first.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Williamson on Friday, August 15, 2014 - 08:18 am:

There's an old joke about someone in a Model T pulling into a gas station and asking the attendant to fill up the oil and check the gas level. :-)

Hope you get your issues sorted soon.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Friday, August 15, 2014 - 02:19 pm:

My T usually doesn't smoke, at least not that I am aware of. Someone following might have something else to say.

Last month we drove it in a parade and I had it at a high idle with Ruckstell and used low Ford. We would stand still for a while and then move up about 100' at a time for about one mile. Then drove slowly to a place where we could wait for the rest of the parade to go by so we could cross into a park for lunch. I idled there for about 5 minutes and noticed a lot of smoke. The top was down and the wind was blowing in a direction the smoke came in my face. I wondered, "where is that smoke coming from?" Then I turned off the engine and the smoke stopped. I don't think any leak was going on the exhaust pipe, because I crawled under later and didn't find oil over everything. About 20 minutes later when the parade had passed, I started up the engine and it did not smoke. I checked this morning and the oil is above the lower petcock. Tomorrow we will be going on a tour, so will see?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Patrick Mulrooney, Webster, NY on Friday, August 15, 2014 - 05:21 pm:

Hi All, I have made a list based upon all of your suggestions. I am hoping to make it thru the season (with quarts of extra oil in the car and a CONSTANT eye on the oil level as the car is running phenomenally well. Then I plan on pulling the motor and rear end to check...well the list is long and getting longer. :-)

Justin, thank you for the pictures. I peeked into the sparkplug port on cylinder 1 and it looks much the same as yours.

Thank you all for the great info and suggestions...as Always!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Friday, August 15, 2014 - 06:03 pm:

I replaced the original rings in my barn fresh 1912 with new wide cast iron rings. This caused my car to smoke like a train and go through a lot of oil in 100 miles.

For $85.00 I purchased a set of new aluminum std pistons and then $49.00 for a set of Hastings std rings.

Took about 3 hours start to finish plus I used a new head gasket, and reused the inspection cover gasket.

Fired it up more compression and no smoke, drove over 100 miles no oil loss.

I have now driven over 750 miles and not used any noticeable oil. The down side is that I have now lost most of my free starts due to the improved compression. In my opinion replace the pistons and rings and give your T a fresh start.

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JohnCodman on Sunday, August 17, 2014 - 10:01 am:

To brasscarguy: Any vibration issues with the switch to Aluminum pistons?
My engine is running great, but if I ever have it apart, the swap to lighter-weight pistons would be something that I would consider.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Sunday, August 17, 2014 - 11:30 am:

None what so ever and I drive this car hard. We did a tour a few weeks back about 250 miles lots of hills in low gear. We drove 35 to 40 miles an hour and saw no ill effects of vibration, and saw no difference between the old iron buckets and the new aluminum pistons. It seems to accelerate a bit quicker and seems to be a bit smoother while the motor is running.

A quick and easy fix and excellent results, keeping in mind my car was a very low mile car 2340 to be exact with less that a .002 taper in the bore.

We used a ball hone and roughed the bores and checked the end gap on the new rings and then popped in the new pistons and rings.

If your bore is oversize, you can buy oversize rings to compensate for the wear. Be sure to measure the bore at the top and the bottom and on around the perimeter of the bore to find any wear on the thrust side of the motor. Modern rings will take care of a good share of an oval bore. Also its important to set a ring in the bore and measure the end gap and grind to fit.


good luck,

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Sunday, August 17, 2014 - 05:28 pm:

I've experienced and heard from others that many times the OS rings made for the OS bore has a ring gap which is too large right out of the box. This was my issue in my earlier post here and the problem was fixed by using the next OS rings. Worked perfect!


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