Old Photo - Nurse's In A Early Model T Touring Car

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Old Photo - Nurse's In A Early Model T Touring Car
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Wednesday, September 03, 2014 - 09:33 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael R Beary on Wednesday, September 03, 2014 - 09:42 am:

No one passed away on their watch. They are happy and on the way home.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Wednesday, September 03, 2014 - 10:10 am:

Reversed steering wheel?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Wednesday, September 03, 2014 - 10:14 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Wednesday, September 03, 2014 - 10:18 am:

Why would a nurse need a touring car and a doctor a coupe? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Wednesday, September 03, 2014 - 10:50 am:

I zoomed in on that car and the Ford across the radiator is correct in the first picture. The first picture is not reversed.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Wednesday, September 03, 2014 - 11:17 am:

By reverse steering wheel I think Larry meant it is flipped on the column. Also, it's possibly just the angle but the pattern on those running boards looks weird.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darel J. Leipold on Wednesday, September 03, 2014 - 11:24 am:

It appears to be a 1910. It has model 60 John Brown side lights which were used mainly in 1910. And the windshield rods have that 1910 bend to them. I would not mind finding that T today, but the two nurses would be a bit old for me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Wednesday, September 03, 2014 - 11:30 am:

How do we know they are nurses?
Are they wearing nurses' hats?
I think they are waitresses riding home their nurses' touring car.
Or just two ladies wearing white dusters.
I think the steering wheel is up-side down.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Wednesday, September 03, 2014 - 11:54 am:

The top boot cover comes half way down the back seat. I guess to reduce the parachute effect?

I agree the running board look different. Just diamonds, without any Ford Script? Not even an upside down Ford Script?

The driver must have short arms to have to have the steering wheel flipped, but really long fingers to be able to reach the gas and spark levers!

Regardless of their profession, they look like they enjoy life!

: ^ )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Wednesday, September 03, 2014 - 12:14 pm:

The picture was correct to begin with.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darel J. Leipold on Wednesday, September 03, 2014 - 12:15 pm:

The running boards seem to be the 1911 style. This T was probably built late in 1910. I have seen several "1910s" that had serial numbers inciting they were built in the "1911" model year but appeared to be 1910s with a feature or two of the 1911s.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Thursday, September 04, 2014 - 08:58 am:

Jay,

Bottom Line Up Front (BLUF): Great photo of a right hand drive touring. I believe it is a 1910 Canadian produced touring.

Additional details:

I believe it is equipped with 30 x 3 1/2 inch non-demountable clinchers on all four wheels which would indicate it is a Canadian touring [for non-demountable clinchers the USA production used 30 x 3 1/2 rear and 30 x 3 in front with the exception of some ambulances assembled for WWI [ref – wasn’t easy to find but if someone wants it – drop me a note and I’ll look it up] and the early 1926 open cars [ref part 2800A1 at http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/U-Z.htm#wheels ]].

Ford of Canada had several differences from the USA cars – as they produced many of their own part (or had them produced in Canada) such as the wheels, body, etc. So they may have had a variation in the running boards as well. Or below it discusses that it may be a standard 1910 running board but the angle makes it appear that way in the photo.

I looked at several photos of 1911 running boards hoping to see the similarity with the running boards in the photo. I did not find a nice clear photo showing them at that same angle. I suspect, that the raised areas on the running boards in the original photo are longer than the diamonds on the standard 1911 running boards (and of course we do not see any Ford on the running board in the original photo. I also think the raised areas might be something other than diamond shaped. On page 86 of Bruce’s book as well as page 25 of the Nov-Dec 1964 “Vintage Ford” (used by permission) they show the photo below of the 1911 – 1912 style USA running boards.



And below is the closest photo I could find to the angle of the original photo. It is a USA 1915 running board and is shown to highlight the difference in the spacing of the row between the diamonds. It is shown on page 203 of Bruce’s book and this copy was taken from page 22 of the Jul-Aug 1989 “Vintage Ford” – used by permission.



Looking closer, I think it is probably 1910 style running board. Below from page 22 May-Jun 1987 “Vintage Ford” (also shown on page 63 of Bruce’s Book) is a USA style 1910 running board:



And when I crop it a little I can more easily see the long dash short row diagonal image that it can project:



And below is the original photo running board for reference:



Also note that the original photo has a low radiator neck as well as the bump in the hood former typical of the 1909-1910 cars.

Based on the above I believe it is a 1910 Canadian produced Model T Ford touring car. And if anyone could take a similar angel photo of a 1910 running board, we might be able to confirm it is a typical USA style 1910 running board or if perhaps Ford of Canada had one supplier that produced a slightly different running board pattern.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Henderson on Thursday, September 04, 2014 - 05:36 pm:

Those are my two very,very favorite nurses! My daughters Nancy Cohen & Cyndy Henderson real nurses wear uniforms and hats!

Happy motoring,

Warren

This is what happen to my cars when I was dating their mother.

This is what happen to my cars when I was dating their mother.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Thursday, September 04, 2014 - 05:55 pm:

My great grand dad drove a Reo. My uncle had a pet goat. You know what happened. G.G.D. was not very happy. He was still driving his Reo in the mid fifties.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Thursday, September 04, 2014 - 11:09 pm:

Hap-
Take another look. It is a left hand drive car.

I don't believe the front tires are 30 x 3-1/2. I think they are 30 x 3.

I still wonder about the running board on the nurse's touring car. The photo you posted above (page 86 of Bruce's book) is Chad Champlin's late 1911 touring.

: ^ )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Friday, September 05, 2014 - 08:17 am:

Keith,

Thank you for the corrections! Yes – Left Hand Drive and yes – 30 x 3 front tires. Looks like I should have drank another cup of coffee before posting the other morning.

I’m still hoping that when someone has the chance to photograph a 1910 style running board they will take a photo from that same general angle. I’d like to know if they look that way at that slant or if the one on the nurses' car was a unique running board pattern.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Victor Bloxsome on Sunday, September 07, 2014 - 04:27 am:

Has nobody noticed the headlamps ? Rushmores I think - and notice a pet peeve of mine : the Bray burner visible in the photo is turned side-on , the fishtail flame would only shine sideways onto the walls of the lamp; the arms of the ceramic should be in line with the focal point of the reflectors so the wide flame reflects all its light onto them .
Picky huh ?
Even if the lamps aren't Rushmores , do I have a point for 100 point Concours judging?

Victor .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Sunday, September 07, 2014 - 08:56 am:

Best I can do on short notice - this 1910 was photographed inside the Henry Ford Museum in 1934.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Sunday, September 07, 2014 - 08:55 pm:

Royce,

Thank you for posting the photo! Yes, it is close to the same angle. But I tried zooming in and changing the contrast etc. but I was not able to bring the ribbed running board pattern out. Maybe a little too dark in that area? Or maybe if the camera would have been a little higher we would have been able to see the running board design?



I'm guessing we may need someone to take a photo in good light from slight in front and to the side of the car with the camera looking down on the car to catch that pattern and see if it comes out similar or significantly different from the original photo.

Again thank you for locating that one -- it is the closest one I have seen so far. It also opens up some additional places for me to look. I think the museum used to call that a 1909 so I didn't bother to see if I could find any photos of that one as I was looking for the 1910 pattern.

Victor,

Thanks for your comment and question -- I hope things are warming up for you in Australia as Fall approaches here. I don't have time to look at the headlamps at the moment, but I'm sure others who are more familiar with the 1909-1911 style lamps will chime in. For a USA produced car, I don't think Rushmore was a normal provider of the lamps, at least not according Bruce's (RIP) on-line encyclopedia at: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/I-O.htm#lamps

From a very quick look, the rectangular vents in the bonnet of the headlamps remind me of the Atwood Castle Model 84 - but those were supposed to come on the 1909s and not the 1910s if I understand it correctly see: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/hl16.htm that has that model shown and is shown below: (yes, electrified)



And no I didn't catch that the burner was turned 90 degrees from what it should have been, but I don't have a car that uses gas lamps (at least not yet).

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Tuesday, September 09, 2014 - 08:45 am:

Below is a comparison of the original photo's running board and the running board on Anthony Ventrice's 1923 touring [Thank you Anthony -- for posting the photo on your profile page. I flipped the photo -- it is actually of the driver's side running board -- but it makes the comparison easier.]



The 1911-1912 running boards are very similar to the 1913-1925 running boards with the major exception that the Ford script runs length wise on the 1911-12 and runs across on the 1913-1925 running boards [ref: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/P-R.htm#rb ]

Note also because the diamonds are not as long as the "interrupted ribs" (dashes) on the 1910 style you have more slanted rows on the later 1911-25 style boards than on the earlier 1910 style boards.

If someone has a chance to snap a photo or if they run across a photo of a known 1910 running board -- that shows those similar diagonals; please add it to this posting. Or if it has been a long time, please send me a copy. You can click on my name at the beginning of the posting and it calls up my profile and my e-mail address is the third line down.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


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