Hardened steel perch bushings: Bad idea.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Hardened steel perch bushings: Bad idea.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, September 03, 2014 - 01:42 pm:

I'm going to use bronze bushings. Why would Mister Thrifty spend $5 for a bronze bushing instead of 70 for a steel one? Because something's going to wear out. I'd rather have that something be a five dollar bushing than a fifty dollar shackle.

Another advantage of the bronze is that when it does go, it will be easier to remove than a rusted-in-place steel one.


No amount of pressing would move this steel bushing, so I've resorted to the old hacksaw trick. It's so hard that I've worn out two blades on it. I'm going to town to see if I can find some more aggressive blades.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Wednesday, September 03, 2014 - 01:49 pm:

Steve did you heat it before pressing if that doesn't work heat it and dunk it hot into PBlaster it doesn't need to be red before dunking just moderately hot works for me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Wednesday, September 03, 2014 - 03:23 pm:

Your hand seems to be healing nicely Steve. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Wednesday, September 03, 2014 - 03:27 pm:

Die grinder with a burr on it will cut a groove with less back and forth motion.:-)
Or dremel tool


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Owens on Wednesday, September 03, 2014 - 05:06 pm:

Could you weld a bead down the center like is done on a bearing race? It should shrink when it cool and almost fall out. Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Wednesday, September 03, 2014 - 05:31 pm:

Dissimilar metals always make a superior bearing surface than metal to like metal.
Good move....... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Wednesday, September 03, 2014 - 07:39 pm:

Heat the bushing red hot with a torch and let it cool. Will probably fall out, and no, it won't get hot enough to hurt the perch or spring. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Morsher on Wednesday, September 03, 2014 - 08:30 pm:

I see a torch in a lot of your posts, Steve. It takes seconds to take a slice out of the bushing with a cutting torch. Saves the arm muscles for other chores.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Wednesday, September 03, 2014 - 09:46 pm:

Often I have seen as much or more wear on the steel object than on the bronze bushing

Your comment has made me think though. I am going to take a set of new shackles into the heat treater to talk about getting them "case hardened". They would then be hard enough that a file wouldn't mark them then.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, September 04, 2014 - 12:23 am:

I like Mack's idea. Sure beats work. I had the thing out in a few minutes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Thursday, September 04, 2014 - 12:42 am:

I used steel bushings in my first Model T 54 years ago, when I didn't know any better. I haven't used anything but bronze since. Why put wear on an old stock shackle, especially a NOS one! And please don't use grease. Oil works much better. Ford knew that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd on Thursday, September 04, 2014 - 11:24 am:

Don't know if all the vendors get their bushings from the same source, the bushings I bought were soft, at least compared to original Ford bushings which were hard.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie on Thursday, September 04, 2014 - 11:44 am:

I've been told that dirt mixes with the lubricating oil and makes a grinding compound that embeds itself into the bronze and wears the shackle. Steel they say is actually a better bearing material in this application. Sort of like how you can drill holes into glass by embedding cutting material into copper.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Thursday, September 04, 2014 - 11:58 am:

Tom
That makes a lot of sense based on my observations.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By lorenzo leon on Friday, September 12, 2014 - 08:15 pm:

steve ,don't know if the trick calls for it but I think your blade is cutting on the back stroke
the arrow goes front


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Friday, September 12, 2014 - 08:51 pm:

By the way Steve, I forgot to mention it when you showed the picture with the hacksaw, but are you using Bi-Metal blades? There is a BUNCH of difference. Lorenzo is correct too. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Friday, September 12, 2014 - 08:53 pm:

Whoops, I looked at the picture again, this time more closely. The arrow says attach to handle end. A bit confusing. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Friday, September 12, 2014 - 09:38 pm:

I hunt down dremel tools and ryobi versions of the same at yard sales and such and have about 4 with different tools on them. Also the bigger 1/4 electric die grinders.They allow me to deal with bushings and such much easier.
That is how I cut out all the bushings in the T transmission I installed new bushings in back 7 years ago or so.


I have often told folks that come to my shop if my dremel tool and my air compressor and torch are missing,I may as well have my hands tied behind my back because I would be unable to fix anything!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, September 12, 2014 - 09:53 pm:

When I had the sign factory here, I used the Sears version of Dremel grinders in the making of signs. I bought them rebuilt for about $20 each. I keep several of them, each with a different attachment so I don't have to change, on the shelf under my work table. Today one of them helped me face a drive shaft bushing.


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