Rocky mountain brake install

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Rocky mountain brake install
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Henderson on Tuesday, September 16, 2014 - 06:48 am:

Here is my problem, I am reinstalling the Rocky mountain brakes on my '17 and need to know the bolt length inside the drum. I ordered the special bolts from Langs and have used them. My question is that they extend 1/8" beyond the nut when fully tightened, is this to long? The reason for this question is that when I removed the rear wheels the old bolts and nuts were sheared off from something inside the drum.

Thank you all for your help,

Warren



Rocky mountain brakes
Rocky mountain brakes
Rocky mountain brakes
Rocky mountain brakes


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Tuesday, September 16, 2014 - 07:48 am:

You may need axle shims to move the drums further out the taper on the axle may be worn


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, September 16, 2014 - 10:28 am:

They do look a bit long. They should be long enough to be able to peen the ends so the nuts won't come off. It is nearly impossible to make the bolts exactly the right length to fit any set of wheels because of variations in the thickness of the spokes due to construction of spokes or shrinkage and wear on the existing spokes. So if your spokes are tight between the felloe and the hub, just tighten the bolts as tight as you can and grind a bit off the ends then peen them to make the nuts stay on.

Another factor in the fitting of rocky mountain drums with the parking brake drum is the parking brake drum will move inward by the thickness of the rocky mtn drum. This will usually require either longer axles, I don't know if the longer axles are still available, or tapered shims between the axle and the hub.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Tuesday, September 16, 2014 - 11:15 am:

The original Rocky Mountain Brake drums use the same bolts as a stock T. The problem is the new ones are not made the same, and are too thick over the hub.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Henderson on Tuesday, September 16, 2014 - 01:22 pm:

Thanks to all who took the time to answer. After tightening down the Rocky mountain special bolts I took one out and replaced it with a stand wheel bolt, but when I tried tightening it up I stripped it off.

Happy motoring,
Warren


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Tuesday, September 16, 2014 - 03:06 pm:

I did it this way (and I'm not suggesting this is necessarily the correct way, but it worked out okay for me):

First, buy new lug nuts. -The old ones have worn, metal-fatigued threads and new lug-nuts are so dirt-cheap, there's no benefit to be gained from re-using the old ones. -But don't discard the old nutsótheyíre yet useful for something else. -Put some kind of identifying mark on all the old lug-nuts.

Put the wheel together with new bolts and tighten the new lug nuts in the usual criss-cross pattern a drummer uses to tighten a drum-head. -Tighten the lug nuts good and tight.

Ideally, what you want is to have two threads protruding from each lug-nut, so mark them accordingly with a magic marker. -Unscrew the lug-nuts, again using the drummer's criss-cross pattern and remove the bolts from the wheel. -Screw two of the old lug-nuts halfway down the threaded shaft of one bolt and tighten the nuts together with the flats lined up so you can hold the assembly in a vice. -Use a hacksaw to shorten the nuts according to the mark you made with your magic marker. -Donít remove the lug-nuts from the bolt. -De-burr and dress the last thread on the tip of the bolt with a file.

Now, loosen the two, old lug-nuts, but donít take them completely off the bolt just yet. -Instead, use the outside lug-nut to chase the rough threads at the tip of the bolt to the point where you can easily start a new lug-nut on the threads of the bolt. -Now, remove all the lug nuts from the bolt, put the shortened bolt through the wheel and another, unshortened bolt through the opposing hole and torque the two bolts down with new lug-nuts. -If, on the shortened bolt, you have three threads showing through the lug-nut, that bolt may turn out to be a bit too long, so you need to correct the cut with the remaining five bolts. -If you have only one thread showing on the shortened bolt, that bolt is still barely passable, but you do need to correct the cut of the remaining bolts one thread longer. -Unscrew both lug-nuts and remove the long bolt and the shortened bolt from the wheel.

Cut the remaining five bolts to the correct length.

Put all the bolts back in the wheel and apply some blue Loc-Tite to the threads. -Now, spin on the new lug-nuts and torque them down using the drummerís criss-cross pattern. -Iíve learned by experience that, sooner or later, youíre going to find a need to unscrew those lug-nuts, and if you peen the bolts, the likelihood of that need will be commensurate with how vigorously you peen. -That will cause you to utter such curses as to cause those written on the front door of King Tutís tomb to sound inconsequential. -Also, if you use red Loc-Tite instead of blue, youíll give yourself a hernia trying to wrench the nuts off and then curse like an ancient-Egyptian funeral director. -Donít give yourself a hernia and curse like an ancient-Egyptian funeral directoróuse blue Loc-Tite, instead.

After you do that, take your magic marker and apply it liberally to the part of the bolts that protrude from the lug-nuts. -Then mount the wheel, torque it on good and tight and give it a spin. -Listen and feel for binding and grinding noises. -If you donít hear or feel anything, youíre home-free. -But if you do, dismount the wheel and check the tips of the bolts to see where the magic marker ink has been scraped off. -You need to file down those spots. -If you still get binding or scraping noises, you may need to insert one or two axle shims for clearance.

Do the other wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Tuesday, September 16, 2014 - 03:10 pm:

The original bolts are soft and twist off pretty easily. It looks to me like you are going to have to cut the bolts off or shim the drums out about 3/16-1/4 inch. Or maybe compromise with a little cut off and a little less shim.


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