Totally OT: Should I get a modern old car?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Totally OT: Should I get a modern old car?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 05:35 pm:

I'm toying with the notion of a pre-computer daily driver devoid of electric windows and other failure-prone automatic "conveniences". It should maintain 65 or 70 mph, be a closed car for wet weather, and not a gas hog. The first thing that comes to mind is a Beetle, because of parts availability and dependability. The only fly in that ointment is that you can't sleep in it comfortably. Any thoughts?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 05:52 pm:

How modern? To modern for me would be the red warning light specials that are half electronic and maybe computer driven ignitions.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve McClelland on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 06:09 pm:

Maybe a late 70's to early 80's american made mid-size station wagon...? Ford fairmont, Chevy Malibu. these came with small V8's as well as 6Cyl. with plenty of hauling and sleeping room.
302 ci. or the 305 ci. v8's did pretty well back then.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 06:22 pm:

Steve" Almost anything pre 80s is a good candidate. I would look for a low mileage one owner. They are out there. A station wagon is a good choice. They are growing in popularity, and should hold there resale value for some time to come. (unless you are 10 foot tall they are easy to sleep in) A one owner four door is a good choice for a cheap ride but you may not be able to resell easily. For gas mileage a 289-302 is usually the best bet in Ford V8s and most of the small block chevys do pretty well. A standard trans will up the mileage also. Dodge slant sixes were very good engines. They did not respond well to overhauls. The rod inserts would "slip" and "pile" on top of each other after an overhaul. A overhauled engine with several hundred miles on it should be OK. The insert issue usually happens in the first 100 miles. They also got great mileage. Good luck with the search and let us know what you find ...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Eliason on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 06:31 pm:

Steve,
My daily driver is a '66 Beetle. It's my only car beside the '24.

Pro:
One man with tools, a floor jack and jack stands can do most jobs including R&R the engine and transaxle.
Probably the simplest practical car beside a T.
Aftermarket parts availability is excellent and getting better all the time.
You can carry a surprising amount of stuff if you take out the right front seat.
A very inexpensive car to run daily if you keep it maintained.
Gas, oil and air will keep it running.
Drives like a sports car compared to the '24.
NO WATER PUMP.

Con:
Mediocre heater/defroster unless you track down any air leaks etc. in the system.
2/40 air conditioning (2 windows at 40mph).
Not a comfy land yacht freeway cruiser, but it will do 65-70 all day if you can stand it.
Has all the crash-worthiness of a Styrofoam cup.
Don't put your claustrophobic friend in the back seat.

Best regards.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 07:55 pm:

Steve

I feel your pain (regarding "failure prone").

But that being said, here's a few points in favor of something newer:

1. Fuel injection (no fooling with that automatic choke setting and much better gas mileage - my Chevy Venture van has LOADS of room, I sleep in it and get 26 mpg on the road)

2. ODBII diagnostics (a car with OBDII will literally tell you whats wrong with it most times)

3. I've gone thru 3 or 4 computer FI vehicles and never had any problem with the computer module.

4. A small to midsize pickemup will let you mount a camper shell, can be really comfortable for short term camping, can tow moderate loads and still get good gas mileage. My last car was a Chevy S10, 24-25 mpg.

just some things to consider.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steven Thum on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 08:09 pm:





Not a real gas saver, but at least you can sleep in it comfortably!

:-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Mazza on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 08:13 pm:

Four cylinder pre 86 mustang hatchback with a five speed. When I was in high school I did have to "SLEEP" in one a coupla times. Got the job done! Mine was a v8, good luck trying to get someone to "sleep" in a four cylinder.......


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 08:14 pm:

Steve,
I've done it a few times in the past. I had great luck with the '64 Impala that I owned in the late eighties. It was a four door hardtop. It had loads of room, a huge trunk and got 23-25 mpg on the highway. I did update it to a 350/TH350 and HEI distributor. It was by far, the cheapest per mile vehicle I've ever owned because it went up in value while I owned it. After three years and about 70k miles, I sold it for about double what I had in it, repairs and all.

After that one, I did a complete restoration on a '71 Chevy pickup. I drove it as my daily driver and T parts hauler for five years. I finally put it into hobby service and purchased a modern 3/4 ton, when I felt bad about overloading it with auction goodies all the time. I just sold it a year agoand came out pretty good on the price. I owned it for 14 years and put 100,000 miles on it and it only cost me about $5K in depreciation. You can't do that with a five year old car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 08:19 pm:

I had an '80 Fairmont wagon. I thought it would be great for me. It was a 200 C.I.D. 6, I had to rebuild it to get it t pas smog, but it had 1 horsepower more than the 4 cylinder 2.3. They also had a V8.
What a dud that was. Like sitting on a park bench, poor mileage, no class at all, handled poorly. never see them anymore.
I liked my Toyota pickup until it got close to 300 thousand miles and I cooked the engine due to broken hose. I like my '84 Volvo, but I always look for Toyotas if I don't have a lead on something else.
Ya, Ya, I know, a Ford will go 3 million miles without a trans or engine overhaul. Ha! And of course that's B.S.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 08:20 pm:

Regarding pickups, in 1987 I bought a brand new Nissan king cab pickup. 22 years and 200,000 miles later, I drove it to the junkyard because it literally rusted out from under me (I should have taken better care of the bodywork). It got a consistent 24 mpg for that entire 22 years and never used oil. Other than normal wear items like brake pads, I replaced one clutch, two alternators, a clutch slave cylinder, one catalytic convertor, and five thermostats (the thermostat would stick open after a few years and I wouldn't notice it until winter when it took a long time for the heater to work).

It had roll up windows and throttle body injection that never gave me any trouble. I think I may have replaced the oxygen sensor once because the service manual told me to, but my old one was working fine because the car ran the same with the new one as it had with the old one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 08:23 pm:

LOL here we go again!

I ask myself that question every time I need to replace a car.
I am usually surprised at what i end up getting

The Audi's were fantastic but expensive to fix -even when I did most of the work myself. I would get another but I am too old to spend my spare time under a car that I use for daily transportation

The Hyundai Sonata was good but had a a problem with a week A frame that messed up a set of tires.

The Mercury Sable wagon was very good except rust got to the floor pan and frame rails.

I am currently driving a Hyundai XG 350 - The jury is still out as to what my opinion of it is that it may be OK I looked a Cadillacs but couldn't find a good one with a reasonable price

BTW I drive 100 miles a day -50 miles to work and 50 miles back - mostly on a highway and I am big, like to be comfortable, and don't want to drive a wimpy underpowered econobox.

Most vehicles got 25 mpg with much of the trip at 75 -80 mph.

At one time -25 years ago -I had a Chevy S-10 V6 5 sp extended cab that I liked but rust got that one


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 08:31 pm:

I had an '80 Fairmont wagon. I thought it would be great for me. It was a 200 C.I.D. 6, I had to rebuild it to get it t pas smog, but it had 1 horsepower more than the 4 cylinder 2.3. They also had a V8.
What a dud that was. Like sitting on a park bench, poor mileage, no class at all, handled poorly. never see them anymore.
I liked my Toyota pickup until it got close to 300 thousand miles and I cooked the engine due to broken hose. I like my '84 Volvo, but I always look for Toyotas if I don't have a lead on something else.
Ya, Ya, I know, a Ford will go 3 million miles without a trans or engine overhaul. Ha! And of course that's B.S.
The pre-80's cars are gone.
The Fords are no more, the GM 70's cars had terrible brake problems on some, some would die with no warning when starting from a stop.
I did like my '76 Nova though, 20MPG with 250 six and three speed.
To get good mileage and power you need to at least have fuel injection.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez-Templeton, CA on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 08:34 pm:

Steve, I think an AMC pacer would be perfect for you. Good milage and ton's of room, and no one would want break into or steal it... ever.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 09:23 pm:

Why weren't Saturns successful in rust country?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 09:35 pm:

I would look for a mid to late 60's chevy or ford wagon with a v8.
Simple to repair and tow worthy and plenty of sleep room.
I feel like the 60's cars were the most reliable 1's as they still had points and carburators but had hydro brakes and comfortable seating.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 09:36 pm:

My choice would be not very popular, but very practical. Either Dodge Dart or Valiant stick shift slant 6. Good mileage, easy to work on and dependable.

The VW Beetle would probably be good in Kansas, but it has a couple of problems. It is not real stable in high wind, and I don't know how it would be on ice. It goes fast on flat ground, but is very slow going uphills. Gets good mileage, and can be worked on but not as easily as the Dart or Valiant.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 09:43 pm:

I still have a 65 VW beetle, I have owned more than 5 in my life. I love them. Easy to fix, and they take a beating. I drove one to college, everyday, it never let me down.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 09:57 pm:

Steve, Maybe you can't stretch out in a Beetle, but don't forget the VW microbus, or van, made during the same time period. The main thing I have against either is I have seen too many go "up in smoke" and Cheech and Chong weren't in them at the time.
Also, don't overlook the Corvair vans that were made. If you're lucky enough to find a reasonable one, I have a rebuildable turbo and carb for a Spyder.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JohnH on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 09:57 pm:

I have never owned a vehicle with a computer, automatic transmission, power steering, or fuel injection. Nor do I intend changing that. The most electronic thing has been the radio.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tyrone Thomas - Topeka KS on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 10:15 pm:

Model A


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 10:21 pm:

Steve I have old ford vans, they are cheap to buy, cheap to fix, generally ignored by the public and they are everywhere to be found around the country, you can sleep in them, haul with them and tow with them. They come in 1/2 ton,3/4, one ton and bigger. The gas mileage is around ten to fifteen mph, but I will say this that the bigger you go the more expensive the parts are to fix it, on the other hand almost all the body and most drivetrain parts are interchangeable from 1975 to 1991. For winter driving I put a parking lot cement curb in the back and carry a bag of cat litter for traction. You are retired, with a little maintiance one of these could outlast you. They come in all different engine and trans combos so the choice is yours, my preference is 351w and aod, 1/2 ton. When I say they are plentiful and cheap, I can buy another one cheaper than I can hanger a fender on one. They do have the aerodynamics of a large cement block, but their versatility is unbelievable. JMHO


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 10:43 pm:

Steve My 65 Corvair isn't bad on gas and the back seat is comfy enough for one parts are available from a couple of vendors and nobody under 60 remembers what it is.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 10:44 pm:

Wes has the right idea. Even the newer ones are good. You can keep your valuables out of sight and secure when traveling.

If you want smaller, the Aerostars and Windstars are good, if you find one that has had the tranny overhauled. Our '02 Windy got 25 mpg on the road.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 12:45 am:

Here in Sweden it's a no brainer if you don't want to make any special fashion statement - use an old Volvo wagon as a daily beater. Don't know the availability in Kansas, but Volvo has sold lots of wagons in both the west coast and the east coast states. They started with electronic injection early in the 70's so you'll have to go back a bit if you don't want any of that and may get another restoration project, but when they're in good condition and get some attention at all they're about as reliable an old car can be - just look at Irv Gordon from Long Island who drives his P1800 long distances every day - he has owned it since new in 1966 and has put 3 million miles (!) on the odometer since then, still running the original engine.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volvo_P1800#Record-breaking_1800

2001-2005 I had a 1988 745 wagon with "just" 300,000 miles - it was still running great when it was hit by another car and their insurance company bought it instead of repairing it - would still have driven it if that hadn't happened, I guess.
245 and older are more rust prone, but rust doesn't seem to be much of a problem in Kansas.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 06:49 am:

Personally, all my modern vehicles have been a heck of a lot more reliable than anything I ever drove back in the seventies. Seems like the only vehicle back then that didn't suck gas like crazy and need constant repairs was one that sat in a garage all its life. I wouldn't be afraid of anything newer that was used. If you are, get a code reader. It will tell what needs fixing and expedite the trouble shooting process. My daily driver is a 2004 Ford Escape. It has 190K miles. About all I have replaced is the normal maintenance stuff (brakes, wheel bearings once, fluids, filters), and one failing engine coil pack that my code reader identified. I would look around and see if a local retired couple is downsizing vehicles. You can generally find some gently used vehicles through those folks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 07:13 am:

I've owned, collected and restored VW's since 1968. The VW type 3 Squareback area good option for simplicity with room to spare.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 07:56 am:

Steve after re-reading your question, thinking about the things you seem to like, sleeping on your question, and drinking three cups of coffee this AM, I have a recommendation that fit most of your requirements.


A 1949 ford is exactly what you need. It is "modern" by your standards, easy to work on, reliable as a rock, will go 65-70 downhill, and has a lot of room in the back seat - as proven by many young folks in the 50's and sixties.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 08:20 am:

Norman, your choice is popular with me!

I used to own a 1969 Plymouth Valiant 100 two door sedan. It was a total stripper, slant six, no power anything, rubber floormats, they even left off the rear seat armrests!

The only maintenance I did on it was change the fluids and occasionally adjust the valves. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Kuhnash Southeastern Ohio on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 08:53 am:

I was also going to recommend the Type III VW. I have owned too many VWs to count. The type III is not the same platform as the beetle, and doesnt share many components, but the basic design is still there. They ride very nice, the heater works better, and I have slept in one many times, and I am 6'$". 1968 was the first year for fuel injection on them, not too bad to change to a carberator. Highway speeds are not a problem. Disc brakes on the front and parts are out there. Dont buy a rusty one.
greg


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JohnCodman on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 09:05 am:

Someone commented about the Mopar slant sixes not responding well to an overhaul. I can't comment on that, but I worked in the automotive service industry for 43 years and never came across a slant-six that needed an overhaul. IMHO they were a candidate for the title of "most bulletproof engine ever made." Any slant six that needed an overhaul either had several hundred thousand miles on it, or had been the victim of severe abuse.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 09:15 am:

Everyone complain's i can't work on my modern car! Myself i do not want to work on my modern car! I want air,heat,cruse,pulse wipers,power disc brakes,power steering,power windows/locks,fuel injection,front wheel drive,radio,and Amercain Made!!!!!! Oil,filter,and grease at every 5,000 miles air filter at 50,000 and spark plugs at 100,000. other than mabey tires and brakes i do not want to touch it for close to 200,000!!!!!!!!!!!!!Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 10:06 am:

Yeh, Bud, and to that I add: you get twice the fuel economy of 1960-70s American cars.

The family beater here is an "orphan" 2004 Mercury Monterey minivan, 130K miles. It has all the toys, including Advance Trac, which helps you keep control on ice.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 10:47 am:

Your right RD and a cup holder large waste basket,and at my age the turn sig buzzer!! Hope your good!!!!!!!!!!!! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 11:16 am:

I don't know whether this is fact or fiction, but I heard that the left side of a V8 engine takes less wear than the right side due to gravity working with the torque of the engine. When the slant 6 was made it was slanted to lower the profile of the hood, but they also slanted it in the direction which would minimize wear. Seems to be the case.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 11:30 am:

Yeah, all the new automatic conveniences are great. Until they fail. My '94 Camry has been a great car. But I recently had to replace a window motor. Luckily it didn't fail in the dead of winter with the window down. Yesterday I learned from the Toyota dealer that fixing the cruise control will take a new computer that costs a hair under a grand, with no guarantee that it will actually make the cruise control work. As for just plugging in a diagnostic computer to locate a problem, that has its limits too. Just like your desktop, after a certain amount of time the computers in your car are considered obsolete and they're no longer "supported". That's why I had to go all the way to Wichita to get a diagnosis from the Toyota dealer. None of the local shops have the equipment for it. Of course the dealer charges a hundred bucks just to find out what the problem is. After that comes the real spending that makes the hundred seem like chump change. The more automatic stuff there is, the sooner it's going to fail and cost you a bundle. That's what has me thinking pre-electronic.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Fischer on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 11:49 am:

This has been said in pieces, but here is my view: Everybody's situation is different.

The way you use your car has a large effect on where your total costs are. For instance, if you put a whole lot of miles on a car, then fuel is your biggest expense. if that's the case, then you can afford to spend more on a better mileage vehicle because the fuel savings offsets the vehicle cost.

If your car sits in the garage most of the time, then depreciation and insurance are your big costs, and fuel doesn't matter much.

One way or the other, a fairly late model modern car can be pretty economical. Back in the 1950's, it seemed like I was always needing a valve job, clutch, tune up, or whatever. And I was lucky to get 16 mpg. Now, my wife's '93 Caravan hardly ever has a maintenance problem and it bets 26 on the road, 22 in town.

For just general utility, it seems to me a well cared for 10 year old modern car is a real bargain. Somebody else has already suffered the major depreciation, so the car is pretty cheap. Gas mileage and reliability are excellent. Nice driving and much safer than older vehicles. No need to carry collision of comprehensive insurance. If you wreck it or have a major maintenance problem, just go buy another one.

If you have the storage space, then two cars begin to make sense. One seldom used gas hog that will pull most anything (thinking Suburban) and one econocar that gets great mileage and receives most of the daily driver miles.

Dick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 12:26 pm:

1996 and Up have OBDII connectors. A code reader costs less than $100 at Harbor Fright. There is a long list of specific codes.

Older son's '96 Tbird is lighting the Check Engine, which makes it fail smog test. Codes are P0174 and P1443. That says too lean, bank 2, and charcoal canister fail. It's obviously the vacuum hose gone bad.

Dealers make $$$ by selling parts, mostly unneeded. Most failures are the peripherals. When a window motor stops in a Ford, it's almost always the protective thermistor in the cable that goes. You squeeze the thermistor in a vise while watching its resistance until it gets back down to 1 ohm, then you have it fixed.

Your bad CC is probably a switch, including the brake switch. It's on the pedal arm in a Ford. Get a factory wiring diagram and have at it.

Buy a '96 or newer next time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 12:39 pm:

Steve, I think that I mentioned this to you previously, but consider another Chevy suburban of the body style that you have, but equipped with the 6.2L diesel engine. The earliest that Chevy offered this combination was 1981, I think, but I'm not sure when they discontinued it as an option. Unless an aftermarket turbocharger kit is installed, these engines aren't known for power, but the economy in this type of vehicle, can't be beat. I towed a loaded car trailer, many a mile with my 1983, which I special ordered, brand new. It was a half ton equipped with four wheel drive, 3.73 axle gears (rear Positraction), 4 speed automatic overdrive transmission, Silverado package, and every power accessory that was offered. I, consistently, got 21 MPG on the highway, unloaded, and 19 MPG loaded with trailer in flat country. the lowest I got was 16 MPG, loaded in mountains. I wish I had never got rid of it, but It would be 32 years old with probably close to a million miles if I still had it. I sold it to a Chevy dealer's mechanic, so he must have liked them. As for the power, I just learned over time what its capabilities were; when to pass and when not to. I've had three Ford diesel pickups (two with 6.9L and one with 7.3L and none got over 12 to 13 MPG.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Claverie on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 12:42 pm:

One word of warning about Beetles and all other VW models from the past.

The fuel line from the body to the engine is a piece of hose, rubber with a cloth jacket. At both ends it is pushed on to tubing with a 'bump'.

PUT HOSE CLAMPS ON IT!!!

I lost two Beetles that way. The hose pops off, one end or the other, and bathes the engine compartment with gas.

POOF! You've lost a car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 01:03 pm:

Another little known item with vintage bugs: you have to have 2 small pry bars when you show up to look at one. Move the crank pulley fore & aft with them and check the end play. The thrust surface wears on the bearing and the crank machines out the block. It'll run but it's no good for a new buyer. You'll foot the bill and the answer is a new block.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 01:08 pm:

So last November I bought a '81 F150 long box super cab with low miles. 351m automatic. I put a new timing set in it with 1/2 tooth cam advance. I now make 15-17 mpg on cruise. One thing I have learned is these carbureted engines are "sensitive" the ethanol gas. I avoid it if at all possible and so sometimes I've had to buy premium. Usually not a problem as with twin fuel tanks it is possible to go 500-600 miles on a fill. Yes it is a big fill, but it can be handy too
I've looked at converting it to EFI for the nicer starting and fuel economy improvement, but I've resisted


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Zachary Dillinger on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 01:16 pm:

I'm actively looking to buy a 1940 or 1941 Packard 120. I guess that could be considered modern compared to a Model T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 01:41 pm:

Peter, it's not just the hose. The tube the hose feeds is pressed in. When it comes unpressed you're in trouble. VOE

Update: When I tried to start the Camry this morning it wouldn't even cough. You could run the starter all day, but you'd go nowhere. This is a new development. The car has always started instantly with no trouble. Looks like I'll be driving the Suburban for at least a few days.
:-(


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roar Sand on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 01:58 pm:

Lots of good stuff here.
I'll put in a plug for a Plymouth Volare or Dodge Apen, if you can find one that is not rusted. I leased a few of those with the 225 slant 6, and with the four speed manual, 4th being overdrive, I got 29 m.p.g. on trips, but that was when the national speed limit was 55 mph.
As far as the slant 6 and durability, the older ones (changed around 1974, I think) with the cylinder head with the spark plug in a tube, a la Hemi, are better than the later ones due to better water flow and cooling.
P.S. I did the engineering on the hydraulic tappet conversion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Rutherford on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 01:58 pm:

I'm fairly sure I am one of the younger guys here but I have always thought you need one no-excuses car. The kind where you jump in, it always starts and does what it is supposed to. It should also have basics like heat, be reasonably comfortable, get acceptable fuel mileage, etc.

The way cars are made now and the way companies supply parts for them, they are meant to be used up and thrown away. If you get to 200,000 miles with out much expense, great! Time to move on because the bills will start rolling in. I'm not saying this is a good or bad thing, but it's just the way things are. The gas is changing, the materials are changing, the technology is changing.

The guys that service cars frankly aren't very good at it, as many of us have found out, so if someone plans to hang on to a car until it completely dies then you need to become the expert. We had a BMW that was a few years old but used the latest computer system and sometimes diagnosis was not fun but it was manageable. I think the computers going bad has been VASTLY blown out of proportion by ignorant service techs. When in doubt, blame the thing they understand the least.

All this is my extremely long-winded way of saying get something fairly new, drive it until the repairs/expenses become frequent and then dump it and move on. The car won't care.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 02:05 pm:

Hey, the Dodge pick up is also quite modern compared to a T - maybe you can put a camper on the bed?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 02:15 pm:

Actually, the Dodge isn't much more modern that a T in the speed department. I can push it up to 55 mph, but it much prefers a less frantic top speed of 45 mph. It's strictly a farm truck for close to home.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 02:40 pm:

Well, it's popular to modernize Chevy and Ford pickups from those years for modern roads.. Another rear axle with higher ratio would help the Dodge to go a little faster, but Ok, you've got T's that needs your project time better. A Volvo 145 wagon would suit your needs, I've slept in one at several swap meets.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber- Spanaway, Wash. on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 02:54 pm:

I agree with Steve about the more "stuff" on a car the more chance for something crapping out.
My daily driver is an '83 VW Rabbit diesel.
We have both a car and PU.
Car has 430000 miles and still does as asked. (one eng rebuild and I did it myself)
We drove it to Alaska a few years ago and with the back seat removed we slept in it just fine all the way...54 MPG avg on that trip.
Our '96 Ford PU has been a lemon.
The hotshot code reader doesn't tell what's really going on. After spending big bucks changing parts I took it to a guy to look at and he says you have to know how to interpret what the code reader says. He fixed it but it's starting hard again. Yuck!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 03:27 pm:

Life's too short to drive a boring car.

Even modern cars can be a lot of fun. Our 2 daily-drivers have a combined 764hp. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Spaziano, Bellflower, CA. on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 03:30 pm:

Two words-Rambler American.

Cheap to buy, maintain, and (depending on engine size), run. Plus, as I'm sure you know, you can sleep in them fairly comfortably.

Out here, I see them all the time on Craig's List.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Walker on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 04:18 pm:

I miss my '78 Olds Cutlass Cruiser SW. Bought it for $100, put about 50,000 miles on it before selling it to my sister for haircuts.

Car didn't last long after that. Her then-husband (absolute derelict) ran it out of gas and left it parked partially in an oncoming lane in a blind hill/curve, where it got careened by a drunk driver.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 05:04 pm:

Mike I could not agree with you more! I'm just not too sure you could find one in good enough shape for a reasonable price.

There will be those that would laugh, but I had a '61 Rambler American that I bought used in '72, and it was one tough little car! And, as opposed to the full size Rambler of that era, the Rambler American had a very conventional open drive line instead of the torque tube. There were a couple engines available, an L-head 6 and the overhead valve 6-cyl. with 3-speed standard shift transmission like I had. Smooth, quiet, snappy, economical, dependable and a pleasure to drive!

Yeah, it was styled like a "box" (and they called some Fords "shoeboxes") but it was a very strong unit-body, very tight, roomy and comfortable. Loved it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 05:06 pm:

Just got rid of a '75 Ford Granada that looked like it just came out of the factory. All the options except it had crank windows which some would prefer. You'd have liked it I'll bet. I did learn something though. No matter how nice it is if it's not "hot" it's worth squat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 05:13 pm:

Or,.....a friend of mine just reminded me of the good luck he had with a used Hyundai (sp?) Excell. Over 200,000 miles on original clutch and only one brake job!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Taylor on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 05:20 pm:

Ok, I love Beetles, VW Buses, and Type 3's.

But I'm not going to recommend them to you, because of a few reasons.

1: Beetle is fine, but as you say, they do not sleep good.

2: A camper van would do nice, but since you sit on top of the front axle you get no protection in a front end collision.

3: Type 3's (Squarebacks) are great but you're going to have trouble getting parts.

So this is what I think you should do: Get something that you like. That's reliable, fairly safe and has an honest amount of room. Or, get something like a 1950 Chevy Fleetline! ;)

Hope this helps,

Peter

:-):-):-):-):-):-):-):-):-):-):-):-):-):-):-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 05:56 pm:

Anything with a straight 6.
And they're pretty easy to get at for servicing....... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nathan Bright on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 06:08 pm:

How about a VW "Caddy" pickup truck? you can get a camper shell pretty easy and diesel versions get 40+ mpg

http://www.wagenwheels.co.uk/car_images/stock84a.jpg


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JohnCodman on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 06:11 pm:

The modern, OBD-2 cars are so much better then anything that they replaced, that it's not even worth discussing. I have love relationships with the three '55 Buicks that I owned, or the two '62 Chrysler 300 hardtops (one was a 300 H that I once drove at a tad over 142 mph). They were great cars, but as to fuel economy and reliability, the worst fuel-injected modern car that I have owned was better then the best pre-OBD-2 set of wheels.My present 2005 Dodge Magnum RT has 340 hp, is chip-limited to 130 mph, and has gotten in excess of 28 mpg on the highway on cruise control. It has 118,000 miles on it - we bought it new, and I have never had to walk home. No car that I have ever owned has been any more reliable, nor gotten better highway fuel economy. For transportation, give me a modern car any day. For fun I wouldn't touch one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 07:51 pm:

"Should I get a modern old car?"

Short answer: NO :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 10:25 pm:

Steve
For your 94 Camry.... 2 options

1. used computer about $150
2. aftermarket cruise control


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 10:39 pm:

It's almost never the computer at fault. Why?

The best engineers are assigned the most complex parts, (computer) while the newbies and boneheads are relegated to the peripherals.

Therefore, the peripherals give the most trouble.

Dealers love to sell high priced parts (computers), and quietly replace the real culprits, too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber- Spanaway, Wash. on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 10:51 pm:

Ralph...
You just gave Steve a couple good reasons not to buy a computer controlled car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 11:31 pm:

A common man can't FIX a computer controlled engine.
Even if you could SEE the trouble you couldn't fix it like you can a carburetor or distributor or any number of other things.
Also there is the absence of bunch of other sensors that go haywire and are impossible to diagnose without specialized equipment.
If Steve can keep his Dodge and T's on the road he can surely keep a "modern" old vehicle going...... :-O


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Friday, September 19, 2014 - 11:52 pm:

You either buy a car with OBDII, or you waste gas.

If you can make your way through a Model T wiring diagram, you can do it with any Ford, if you have the manuals.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Saturday, September 20, 2014 - 12:00 am:

My Dad had a 64 Rambler full size station wagon with Rambler's aluminum block inline six and push button on the dash, three speed automatic transmission. I got my driver's license that year and used to take my friends joy riding and do burnouts by raising the engine's RPMs to maybe 2000 in neutral, and then punching the pushbutton on the dash. It wasn't much of a burn out; more like a churp. When my Dad traded it in, the dealer immediately wholesaled it to a used car dealer, On the way to the used dealer's lot from the new car dealer, the transmission went to pieces and had to be towed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber- Spanaway, Wash. on Saturday, September 20, 2014 - 12:25 am:

If it costs $500+ every time a sensor goes bad you can buy a lot of gas for that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eddy Lee Emerson on Saturday, September 20, 2014 - 06:54 am:

Steve, My uncle Clarence Emerson was an itinerant plasterer. He had a model A tudor from which he removed the front passenger seat and the entire rear seat. He then installed a bed on the passenger side of the car. In the empty space behind the drivers seat he constructed a cabinet to store his clothes. When he was on the road, he lived in that Model A. Any car with bucket seats could be treated the same way. Ed


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Saturday, September 20, 2014 - 10:12 am:

The only sensor to go bad in 130K miles on my Monty was a $40 brake pressure switch on the MC.

Don't be afraid of wires.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dexter Doucet on Saturday, September 20, 2014 - 05:33 pm:

A year ago I came across a 91 corolla wagon. It was a one owner with one hundred and seven thousand mikes on it. Still has cold AC and it's still R12. I paid 600$ but the paint job is toast. I absolutely love that car. Turned down a 1000$ dollar from a friend. I got the notion to by a car like that from this forum.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Saturday, September 20, 2014 - 06:10 pm:

If I didn't have to subject my cars to salt, my daily-drivers would be 64-72 GM A-body (Chevelle, LeMans, Cutlass, Skylark). You can buy anything you need for them, and the chassis is very modern in design compared to most cars of their time. Brake and suspension upgrades are cheap and easy, and anything you can bolt a Small Block Chevy into is always going to be cheap to keep running. They are roomy and comfortable, yet not "boats" like the full-size cars of the era.

The Chevelle is the most expensive of the A-bodies but have the most aftermarket support resulting in affordable parts. The 4-doors, wagons, and El Caminos are still cheap, at about 1/3-1/2 the cost of a comparable 2-door Chevelle.

The Buick/Olds/Pontiac are cheaper to buy, but more expensive to fix and maintain since there is less aftermarket support for B/O/P specific parts.

25mpg would not be difficult with the addition of an overdrive trans.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Hoffman - Gold Country of Calif. on Saturday, September 20, 2014 - 09:50 pm:

I spent the last 20 years before retirement maintaining a fleet of about 40 computer controlled vehicles that we ran for 70 to 100 thousand miles. In that time I only replaced one computer and that didn't turn out to be the problem. I think the computers are the least of the problems. The majority seemed to be smog related sensors.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Sunday, September 21, 2014 - 09:49 am:

Well Steve, you've had two days of opinions, made any decisions?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, September 21, 2014 - 10:03 am:

Given the current state of the dead or dying twenty-year-old Camry, I'm inclined to go with Jim Rutherford's approach: dump it and get something five or ten years old. As he says, it won't care. That will give me time to shop around and find something pre-computer and get it in good enough shape to be reliable.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Rutherford on Sunday, September 21, 2014 - 11:52 am:

Good luck with everything Steve. I think new-ish cars are very good in general. The stuff that goes wrong anymore is usually irrelevant things like trim falling off, maybe bad paint but mechanically most are very reliable. I would stick with Japanese or American, I'm not a big fan of most modern European cars for use as daily transportation and I would assume American stuff would be easier to find parts for in your neck of the woods.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George_Cherry Hill NJ on Sunday, September 21, 2014 - 12:12 pm:

The Honda Accords that are 12 years old or so seem to be todays modern treasures...just ask the local Honda dealers...better yet, the Used Car Manager. Around here, the Honda guys and techs BUY the trade in's that have less than 150K on them before they even pass through the dealer used car inventory and giggle that they have another 150K and all they will need to think about is tires and brakes!

The best thing you can invest in is a cheap OBDII reader.

I recently had a case on my modern iron where the check engine light came on...

Don't have an OBDII (actually do but don't know where it is :-))...

Scheduled at the dealer...OBDII says 2422...

Guy looks it up...'defect in canister system' so I'm really glad I drove it in...because...I have not a clue what a canister system is because when I asked if it was like the old EGR system he said NO.

What the guy did next impressed the heck out of me...

SEARCH SERVICE BULLETINS FOR CODE SHOWN BELOW!

He entered 2422...

It came back there was a better than 90% chance that a spider had crawled into the vent tube and either got caught or built a nest!

Sure enough, they pulled the tube and canister fitting, and there was a live spider in it, plus two q-tip sized buds!!! I was impressed!

OK, so it cost a Benjamin and a Grant...but if someday that database shows up on the internet...folks would be foolish to not carry an OBDII


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Sunday, September 21, 2014 - 12:41 pm:

I stay away from Honda automatic transmission cars. You can not change the trans filter without removing the transmission on them.
Stay away from late 80's and early 90's Volvos, they have electrical problems that can be a real beech to find. Too much electrical junk on them.
If you can't get a '96 or later car go back to the '60 and older. but I don't know where you are going to find all those VW type 3 and Ramblers & other great old cars that guys have recommended.
Even a VW Vanagan here in Taxafornia will bring $12,000 or more. And all the vans have 200,000 miles on them and are selling for big money and need work and get 20 MPG and less.
The six minivans I had got less than 20, some as low as 13 (Astro van). Most got 16.

I've got my '51 Ford F1 just about ready to go.
No smog certificate, no computer, no automatic transmission, no EGR, no expensive sensors and I can finish a clutch job the same month I start.
And everybody thinks I.m super rich driving around in that CLASSIC truck that you gotta have everything machined or fabricated for.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Sunday, September 21, 2014 - 12:44 pm:

If you get a check engine light on a modern car, but the car seems to be running fine, the first thing to do is make sure your gas cap is tight. Some cars flip a code if the cap is missing or loose.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDonald-Federal Way, Wa. on Sunday, September 21, 2014 - 12:44 pm:

Steve
I have come to a point in my life that maybe some of the new modern parts available aren't that
bad and I have found helpful to have.

1 I've received glasses to help see.

2 Also been fitted for false teeth for eating.

3 Hearing aids to help hear.

4 And oxygen to help breath (and get better millage.)

So all in all some new things might make life a little more enjoyable.

Just a thought, your mileage may very due to age.

BOB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Sunday, September 21, 2014 - 12:47 pm:

George, I'll send you the DTC (Diagnostic Trouble Code) Library pgm. It's several files, with DTChelp.exe .

select manufacturer: . . OBDII GENERIC

enter DTC: P 2422

description: EVAP Emissionn Sys Vent Valve Stuck Closed
--------------------

I have two HF OBDII readers. I believe this pgm came with the more expensive one, which shows all the parameters in real time.

Why would anybody buy a pre-1996 modern?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Sunday, September 21, 2014 - 01:52 pm:

The cheap OBDII scanners don't give a lot of information, but usually a google search will help diagnose the most-likely scenario once you get the code.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Sunday, September 21, 2014 - 02:03 pm:

Bingo, Derek. Most modern cars have a forum on the web. If you have a cheap scanner, get the code, go onto Google or the applicable forum, and type "make of car code xxxx" and up will pop all sorts of discussion on the code, what it means, and how people fixed it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, September 26, 2014 - 11:53 pm:

Update: The twenty-year-old Camry carried me a lot of miles, but just 1500 shy of a quarter million miles expensive failures set in, prompting a change. I just had to pour in another $375 for a new distributor so I could drive it to a dealer to trade it in. So this afternoon I brought home a new 2008 Camry LE. If I can get 100,000 miles out of it before all the automatic electronic crap goes south, I'll be a happy camper. That would be about 8 a mile.

Meanwhile, I've been doing a bit of online research on postwar cars and fuel economy. It seems the leading choices are Studebaker and Rambler American. A Champ might be a bit cramped, but a Land Cruiser or a Commander might be OK. The AMC and Studebaker results in the economy run were so consistently good that eventually they were relegated to a separate class so the Big Three wouldn't have to compete against them.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ief_Yc-E-Vk


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber- Spanaway, Wash. on Saturday, September 27, 2014 - 12:33 am:

Steve...I have a '49 Studebaker Champ that's a survivor with 60,000 miles.
It's a really nice car to drive.
Comfortable, lots of leg room, OD and miserly on gas.
Personally I think the styling leaves some to be desired.
I traded a cement mixer for it about 1975 and have driven it some every summer since.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Clipner-Los Angeles on Sunday, September 28, 2014 - 02:00 am:

Find something with a slant six, legend says they've been known to heal themselves.
Geo n L.A.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Sunday, September 28, 2014 - 07:36 am:

Well here's something to deal with, and there's really nothing we can do about it, and that's the big problem. Just heard last Wed. on the morning show, complete with a demonstration, of how the wonderful hackers have now figured out a way to TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR MODERN CAR through it's computer. Shut it off, turn on all the accessories, turn it back on, etc. The guy did it right from the passenger seat on a laptop. And the worst part of it is, if you have one of the "Park Assist" cars, the hacker can even STEER it for you! How's that for scary? Fortunately my "moderns" aren't so modern...one is 18, the other 20 years old so no park assist, but my advice would be if you own one with park assist, get it disabled immediately!
So Steve, find yourself an "old modern" car, with no computer!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Sunday, September 28, 2014 - 08:13 am:

Truth is if you need park assist on a car, you dont need a car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Sunday, September 28, 2014 - 08:49 am:

Hear! Hear! Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Michael Rogers on Sunday, September 28, 2014 - 08:54 am:

Steve, my Dodge truck is for sale. It has 200,000 miles on the diesel and should get 200,000 more. Runs good and is setup to carry a T on the bed. I have had it haul 2 t's to South Dakota, Minnesota,New Hampshire and, Utah. Runs great, is not too bad body wise and the interior is still in pretty good shape.Maybe I can put some pics on later.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Sunday, September 28, 2014 - 10:18 am:

Steve

I think you made a wise choice with the Camry - it may outlive you.

But if not, let me pass on my experience with the Rambler American. I owned two, a 58 and a 60. Both had flathead 6's, both were easy to work on and both gave excellent gas mileage for their day.

At that time I drove a lot in Canada where the speed limit was usually 100 kph or 62 mph. I could count on 30 to 32 mpg (us gallon).

One thing to beware of with the Rambler American ... with the fully reclining seats your girlfriends dad may not let you take her to the drive in movie. Always a problem. ;o)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, September 28, 2014 - 10:42 am:

I already have a Dodge truck. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Sunday, September 28, 2014 - 12:32 pm:

Steve saw this maybe you haven't thought of something like this
http://www.cruisenewsonline.com/ClassifiedPics/73AMCHornet241.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Fischer on Sunday, September 28, 2014 - 12:40 pm:

Steve, I agree that the Camry should be a good car. But I hope it doesn't outlive you. I hope to outlive all my cars (except the T, of course).

I lost two different Toyota's due to corrosion of the aluminum heads. One was a 79 Celica (4 cyl) and the other was a similar year Supra (6 cyl). I noticed that both those body styles seemed to disappear off the road almost overnight. Always wondered if corroding heads weren't sort of a time bomb.

If I had it to do over again I would have gone to more lengths to prevent corrosion. Maybe more regular change of coolant, and also some sort of corrosion inhibitor such as Norosion. Otherwise they were both pleasant cars.

Dick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Monday, September 29, 2014 - 08:22 am:

Mack and Wes...couldn't agree with you more! However, that said, far too many younger generations that can't even park a car properly in diagonal spaces, let alone parallel, and they also love these electronic "upgrades" and buy them by the thousands. This alone, will be putting thousands of otherwise innocent drivers on the road at risk, should some idiot hacker(s) decide to "have some fun". Lets just hope and pray it doesn't really materialize.


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