I finally got me Ruckstall rear end installed!

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: I finally got me Ruckstall rear end installed!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Henderson on Saturday, October 04, 2014 - 06:27 pm:

I finally got me Ruckstall rear end installed! After many delays waiting for parts (weeks at a time) and me just being slow, I managed to get it installed this week. Don't ask me how I did it because I'm not sure. I had to use a come-along to get the drive shaft up to the back of the transmission and I used a C-clamp to get the spring hanger to line up close enough to make everything fit. I used two shims on the passenger side rear wheel, to get the proper clearance so there was no noise when I was turning the wheel.

Happy motoring,

Warren

Ruckstell Axle
Ruckstell Axle
Ruckstall Axle


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Saturday, October 04, 2014 - 07:32 pm:

Warren,

From the photos, it does not appear that your rear spring is centered.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Saturday, October 04, 2014 - 08:06 pm:

Jerry is right, it looks like the spring is not centered in the frame.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Saturday, October 04, 2014 - 09:11 pm:

There is a square hole in the center of the crossmember of the frame. The head of the bolt in the center of the spring should be in that square hole. By the way there is also a leather or rubber pad between the spring and the crossmember. The car will steer much better if you get the axle centered.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, October 04, 2014 - 09:42 pm:

Warren, once you have the spring centred, there is another little job you should do. I suggest you remove the wheel with the two axle shims and replace the two with one thicker shim. Shims are not the best answer to worn hubs and axles. Two shims give even greater opportunity for movement between the components. It could rapidly become a safety issue.

Hope this helps.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Henderson on Sunday, October 05, 2014 - 11:32 am:

Thank you Jerry, Jim, Norman and Allen for sharing that information. I will take the axle out and try to line up the center bolt. Allen, I did not know that the shims come in different thickness and will see if I can order the correct size. I have to shim the axle because with the Rocky Mountain Brakes I need more clearance.

Happy motoring,

Warren



Ruckstell Axle


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Sunday, October 05, 2014 - 12:15 pm:

If you are using a standard bolt 5 sided bolt, the head might not fit in the square centering hole unless positioned or filed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, October 05, 2014 - 12:17 pm:

Shims only come in one thickness, make your own out of thicker material.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd on Monday, October 06, 2014 - 10:50 am:

"standard bolt 5 sided bolt"

Huh?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Monday, October 06, 2014 - 11:02 am:

Warren,

I generally hate the use of axle shims. Others seem to hate that I hate them. I won't go into that here. However, if you do use them, please be sure to regularly check the axle nut for tightness. Shims can have a way of wearing down and letting the hub/axle assembly work loose. Keeping the nut tight is good insurance against later problems.

If you do decide to make thicker shims, please use steel shim stock and not aluminum or brass.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Monday, October 06, 2014 - 11:31 am:

On the first weekend trip I made with my first Model T many years ago I ended up at the side of the dirt road in the middle of a forest. I needed to make a rear wheel quiet as you did. I cut shims out of what I had... a soda can. It took a little longer than I expected because I had to find somewhere to put the contents of the can!

In a pinch an aluminum shim will work, but eventually the wheel loosens and you have to replace the shim... with additional wear happening to the axle or wheel... I agree with Jerry, use steel shim stock if you can (pun, steel can?).

TH


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