I cannot find 1/4 x 1 3/4 carriage bolts at hardware stores.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: I cannot find 1/4 x 1 3/4 carriage bolts at hardware stores.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Poane on Sunday, October 05, 2014 - 09:40 am:

I cannot find 1/4 x 1 3/4 carriage bolts at hardware stores.

These are for the braces that go on the back of the seats.

I am afraid if I out a 2" bolt on and cut off 1/4 inch I will then not be able to unscrew the bolt because of a damaged thread. Do you know if it is ok to cut off the bolt or better to go on line somewhere and by the 1 3/4 length?

I am putting the car together, then taking it all apart again after I make sure I have all the parts before I paint it. Otherwise it would not matter if I could not take off the nut - tho I do not want to make it hard for the next guy.

Thanks! Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Poane on Sunday, October 05, 2014 - 09:42 am:

larger picture.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Sunday, October 05, 2014 - 09:43 am:

I googled "1/4 x 1 3/4 carriage bolt" and came up with a bunch of sources:

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&rlz=1C1PRFA_enUS447US447&io n=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=1%2F4%20x%201%203%2F4%20carriage%20bolt


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Sunday, October 05, 2014 - 10:16 am:

Robert...I've shortened long bolts by first screwing on the nut up ahead of where you want to cut off the threads, use a dremel with cut-off wheel, then assuming you make a fairly straight cut, you back the nut off the bolt, and that usually cleans up the threads to where it'll go back on very nicely. Never had a problem doing it that way. You can also chase the threads with a die afterwards.

Some commercial/industrial supply houses have odd length bolts too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Poane on Sunday, October 05, 2014 - 10:18 am:

Thanks!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Sunday, October 05, 2014 - 11:30 am:

Robert like Tim said, except you can simply use a hacksaw if no Dremel handy, and clean up the cut end with a file or belt sander before unscrewing the chase nut. Done it hundreds of times.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Sunday, October 05, 2014 - 11:32 am:

After I cut a screw or bolt with a hacksaw, I file the end flat and and then give it a slight taper. Sometimes I use the bench grinder but using a file gives me better control.

Below is an example from the internet.

1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, October 05, 2014 - 05:14 pm:

Agreed, put on a nut, cut of what you want, remove the nut, taper a little with a file or grinder, and smooth it up with a wire brush. But with modern hardware you will probably have modern markings to grind off, then wire brush to remove the grind marks. If it's plated, as most are now, paint won't stay on it. I destroy the plating with a little bath of muriatic acid, rinse, prep, and dry. Then you're ready for painting. I use Rustoleum, glossy or satin depending on what it's for, and bake at 180200 to dry.


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