OT - Any early aviation history buffs out there? I'm trying to find information on a 1908 flight near Ithaca N.Y.

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: OT - Any early aviation history buffs out there? I'm trying to find information on a 1908 flight near Ithaca N.Y.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Monday, October 27, 2014 - 07:57 am:

I'm attempting to learn more about this flight:



Oscar Trorlight is listed as a member of the class of 1907 in the Cornell University classbook:



Thanks for any help or leads,

Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Monday, October 27, 2014 - 08:47 am:

One article on the flight. I would like to find a photo or additional information about this flight and aircraft:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Olsen on Monday, October 27, 2014 - 08:52 am:

Try the EAA, their history buffs might have info


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Monday, October 27, 2014 - 09:00 am:

Thanks Chris, I'll give them a call. I searched both students last names on their sight with no hits.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dwayne Durand on Monday, October 27, 2014 - 12:59 pm:

The Glenn H. Curtiss Aviation Museum is about 50 miles from Ithaca. They may have the answer to your question. There is contact information on the website http://www.glennhcurtissmuseum.org/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Monday, October 27, 2014 - 02:15 pm:

I sure wouldn't want to fly for several miles at an altitude of 50 feet! Looks like newspaper reporting was about as accurate then as it is today.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard D. Dennis on Monday, October 27, 2014 - 03:21 pm:

Personally I think the newspaper article is probably very accurate. 1908 aviation wasn't known for it's high altitude achievements!

Howard Dennis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Monday, October 27, 2014 - 03:29 pm:

Gilbert,
I once flew about 60 miles through Nevada at about 50 feet, I did climb to go over the power lines and had to climb and turn hard once to miss a hawk that flew up in front of me, but I seldom got over 80 feet in 60 miles. I am sure that the newspaper probably erred on the high side rather than the low side.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard D. Dennis on Monday, October 27, 2014 - 03:35 pm:

Just like today before you bad mouth a news source you really should do your own research.

Wilbur Wright held the altitude record in 1908 at 360ft. Before that it was 13ft.

Howard Dennis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John H. Nichols on Monday, October 27, 2014 - 03:41 pm:

Dear Rob, Every town and every County by law must have a Historian. I would send a letter to the office of the County Clerk, Ithaca, asking if they can give you name of the Town Historian for the area you are researching. You can most likely get some info
( Name and telephone number.

John


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Monday, October 27, 2014 - 04:37 pm:

For the most part I'm impressed by the accuracy of turn of the century (last one, not this one) news reporting. I think the public demanded accuracy, as printed news was the only way to receive information from the outside world.


(Message edited by rob on October 27, 2014)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Monday, October 27, 2014 - 04:56 pm:

Thanks guys. John, good idea. I'll try a few more things,
Rob

(Message edited by rob on October 27, 2014)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Monday, October 27, 2014 - 08:45 pm:

Hells bells in the 60's and 70's I flew high and never left the ground! so 50 ft would be fantastic to me :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Monday, October 27, 2014 - 10:48 pm:

This article is what caught my attention:



Hammondsport is where Glenn Curtis had his motorcycle and new Aeroplane business. The two Cornell students (or graduates) were reported to be using a six cylinder 40 hp engine. If they were using one of the new Curtis creations, or other new Aeroplane engine, would they have said they needed a new engine to be able to fly a greater distance. Could they be using an auto engine?

I don't know, but may be able to find out, we'll see. The flight made this list of heavier than air flights for the year:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Partington on Monday, October 27, 2014 - 11:05 pm:

Rob,I would talk to the Curtiss museum at Hammondsport NY, they have a lot of early material regarding early flights by Glenn Curtis in NY state. Bin there done that & ticked that box a bit like owning or driving a K


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Monday, October 27, 2014 - 11:22 pm:

Doug. I spoke with their curator. He was very helpful, but had no information on these two men or their aircraft. Hope to see you back in the U.S. soon,
Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Coco on Tuesday, October 28, 2014 - 06:10 pm:

You might try contacting the Wright Experience outside of Warrenton, Virginia. Their focus is on Wright Brothers planes, of course, but they've done extensive research on all early flight. Owner is Ken Hyde.



http://www.wrightexperience.com/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Wednesday, November 12, 2014 - 08:31 pm:

A little more information about the two Cornell students and flight pioneers. Turns out the newspaper spelling on one of the students was misspelled. My initial interest was due to the 40 hp 6 cyl. engine the two students used.

While I may never know about the engine, one of the students continued on as a pioneer in the aviation industry until his death in 1926.

Thank you E. Neely,
Research Services
Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections
Cornell University

What Ms. Neely found:

(Newspaper clips).

[The Oregonian, 15 May 1926, p35]

Ex-Portland Man Dies.

John c. Burkhart Designed First Oregon-Built Plane.

SANTA BARBARA, Cal., May 29. (Special.) John Conner Burkhart, 43, who designed the first Oregon-built airplane successfully flown by Oregon men, died here May 15. He is survived by his widow.

Mr. Burkhart was a graduate of Cornell university. He was a member of the University club in Portland, Or.; of the old Portland Rowing club and the Oregon Yacht club. He was on the plane designed by Mr. Burkhart that the late Lieutenant Barin, who piloted the NC-1 on the navy's trans-Atlantic flight in when he first learned to fly. Mr. Burkhart took photographs at the flight experimental camp at Kitty Hawk, N.C., and witnessed Glen H. Curtis flight at Hammondsport, N.Y, July 4, 1908, when he won the trophy of the scientific American. In 1911 he became associate editor of aeronautics, becoming recognized authority on technical matters pertaining to mechanical flight. During the world war he was with the aviation corps at Washington, D. C. where he attained the rank of Captain.

Airplanes of his design and configuration were seen in flight at numerous county fairs and on other attractions in the Willamette valley, Oregon as early as 1912, 1913 and 1914. His first plane was completed in 1910.

[The Oregonian, 30 May 1926, p13]
Inscription:
Capt, Air Service


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration