Look at what I can haul?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Look at what I can haul?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Saturday, November 01, 2014 - 03:48 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, November 01, 2014 - 04:01 pm:

But it's 1917-1923, not 1915. I know, picky, picky, picky.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Henrichs on Saturday, November 01, 2014 - 05:51 pm:

The hay might be from 1915. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, November 01, 2014 - 05:58 pm:

The good news is that, in the pursuit of improvement, vehicles are ugly, and those brick roads and
trolley tracks were ripped up in favor of more lanes and "green strips".

Can you imagine trying to discuss code enforced green strips and bicycle lanes with the driver of
that Model T ? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, November 01, 2014 - 06:09 pm:

Yup,Im old enough to remember loading hay on the wagon with a hay loader.We had one of the later one's that was all metal instead of wood slats.That is one well picthed load but by weight is the Dodge haulling more hay?? Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Saturday, November 01, 2014 - 06:09 pm:

Just looked up "Dodge" in an on-line dictionary. It said "Avoid".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Saturday, November 01, 2014 - 06:59 pm:

Dang it Hal,I about fell out of the chair Bud! Heheheheh :>)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Saturday, November 01, 2014 - 07:26 pm:

OMG....what else can I say? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, November 01, 2014 - 07:42 pm:

Going on 5x4 round bales at an estimated 450kg x 4 for the load, there's les than 2 tonnes on the trailer. That said two on the front and back would make 6 and another 4 in the valleys on top, and he would then have a load,

We have just finished hauling some 180 such bales of medic hay into storage. Those rounds sure beat small squares.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Saturday, November 01, 2014 - 08:52 pm:

Hey Allan
I disagree, I can haul and stack twice as many tons of small round bales than round, but I prefer either 3x4x8 or 4x4x8 bales, they go even faster. There was a time when we had three different types of bales in the same field, small square, large round and 4x4x8 one tons. What is medic hay?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Saturday, November 01, 2014 - 08:55 pm:

I looked it up on the webernet, looks interesting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Saturday, November 01, 2014 - 09:31 pm:

Steve,



Assuming the windshield, fenders, radiator & hood are original to the vehicle, the equal length windshield hinges would make it a 1917 as the unequal windshield hinges were introduced around Apr 1917 ref: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/U-Z.htm#wshld

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux on Saturday, November 01, 2014 - 09:36 pm:

All the farms around here are doing away with their round balers. The cows are complaining about the lack of a square meal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By TOM on Saturday, November 01, 2014 - 10:20 pm:

Is that a white wall tire on the T?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andrew Deckman, Ogden Utah on Saturday, November 01, 2014 - 10:34 pm:

No that is the metal rim.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Saturday, November 01, 2014 - 11:32 pm:

I think it is a whitewall. The silver rims didn't come out until 1919. It seems to extend well out onto the tire as well. Those tires look like the ones on the early '17 Runabout pictured below.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John P Noonan on Sunday, November 02, 2014 - 12:03 am:

It amazes me that there is this vast collection of photos of ordinary people posing beside what must have been their most valued possession back in the day. And i feel just as lucky to be able to continue this appreciation to drive and preserve "The car that changed the world"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, November 02, 2014 - 12:37 am:

Hi Gustav,

Our medic is better than alfalfa, more leaf and less stem. It is dry grown, so it varies in quality depending on the season.

A major advantage of round bales is their ability to shed water when stored outside. Any kind of square bale will not fare as well. An enterprising fellow has developed a system of black recycled plastic caps to shed water from big squares. They are stacked in the open, 4 high, in a long row. The caps are fitted to the top and fixed to the stack with long pins on the side.

The truckers sure like the big one ton squares. Makes their job easy. There are times when we could use large squares. It makes feeding out part bales much easier.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Sunday, November 02, 2014 - 11:47 am:

Hey Allan,
We use plastic hay tarps, made of a heavy plastic coated fabric with short boards sewn into the sides to attach the tie down straps, they work real well if the straps are kept tight and the tarps will last up to four years. One ton bales feed better on the ground than the small square, it seems that the cows do not like to walk on the one ton flakes, but they will stomp through a small bale and tromp much into the dirt.
I grow about 100 acres of alfalfa, but it is an older variety with more stem than the newer "multi-leaf" varieties, because the stand will last up to 13 years opposed to the 3 years of the newer types. All our crops in this area are irrigated as we only get about 8 inches of moisture a year, and most of that is snow in the winter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John H. Nichols on Sunday, November 02, 2014 - 03:12 pm:

Allen,

In the county where Dan Lives, your estimate would be over the available hay. I should know as I have Kinfolk in that County, but do not have winters like Dan.

Just kiddin Dan


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