Making a oil dam for a one-piece pan-how high?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Making a oil dam for a one-piece pan-how high?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Hagen on Thursday, November 13, 2014 - 04:25 pm:

How high and what thickness of metal to make a oil dam for a one piece pan?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Thursday, November 13, 2014 - 11:40 pm:

Gary-
I made mine the same height of the upper part of the inspection cover. It does not need to be very thick. I braised mine in place. It doesn't need to be an "oil tight" fit.

: ^ )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Chantrell - Adelaide, Australia on Friday, November 14, 2014 - 02:46 pm:

No more than 1" high. The important thing is to add scoops to each of the big end caps appropriately drilled to allow oil to enter. Chev 4 scoops work well.

All our 'T's were all modified this way after running a big end bearing in my pop's 1923 tourer many, many years ago at a show in the Barossa Valley and using somebody's leather belt as a bearing to get home. We modified each and every car after this and never ran a bearing again. For some reason it seems to be not a very popular modification.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Friday, November 14, 2014 - 06:17 pm:

Gary -- If you add that piece, be sure to take the pan to someone with a straightening jig afterward. Welding (or brazing) on a crankcase will distort it. (Guess how I know!) :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Friday, November 14, 2014 - 06:20 pm:

David -- The reason it's not very popular is because you're using Chevy parts. All the T parts vendors have aftermarket dippers for FORDS. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Chantrell - Adelaide, Australia on Saturday, November 15, 2014 - 05:32 am:

I must say we used to braze weld on scoops prior to pouring and machining our own big end bearings. Buying scoops from a supplier is just easier. Sorry I used the nasty 'C' word!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Saturday, November 15, 2014 - 07:44 am:

Here is an original one piece pan showing the oil dam at the third main bearing. It is brazed and soldered in place. There is hole punched in the oil dam to maintain the oil level in the pan dips. You can also see the brazing on the pan rivets to stop leakage.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Saturday, November 15, 2014 - 07:46 am:

To answer Gary's original question - the oil dam is .036" steel. It is the width of the pan and has about 1/4" clearance minimum around the main cap and bolts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Saturday, November 15, 2014 - 08:00 am:

Later in 1910 the dam was dropped, according to the encyclopedia. In march 1911 at about #44,400 the three dip removable bottom plate appeared.

(Message edited by Roger K on November 15, 2014)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Saturday, November 15, 2014 - 01:53 pm:

I installed a dam in my '12 pan. Two things to consider.
1 After you run the engine the oil level on the sight glass will not be accurate until the engine sits for awhile.
2 It's important to drill a couple of small holes near the bottom of the dam to allow the oil to flow back into the sump. Guess this prevents a build up in the bottom.
Check out Terry Horlich's design a couple of years ago.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Chantrell - Adelaide, Australia on Saturday, November 15, 2014 - 05:09 pm:

The way Royce shows with the early pan is how we used to weld our into the sump and then set the level about 1". The oil level is not a problem, once full the dam stays full. Changing the oil is the problem on a "no inspection" plate sump, but for any other you just drop the plate off too during an oil change.

Great photos Royce, thank you for sharing them. As I wrote in a post above, not a popular modification, but I do not know why, it works extremely well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Hagen on Friday, November 21, 2014 - 04:59 pm:

Thanks for the input men. Wonder what Kim Dobbins design is for this dam?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Hagen on Friday, November 21, 2014 - 09:32 pm:

So the oil doesn't all drain into the sump? Oil changes are done more often I would imagine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Hagen on Friday, November 21, 2014 - 09:39 pm:

Gene how big and where did you drill the holes? Do you have a photo?


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