Rivits for a one piece pan.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Rivits for a one piece pan.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Hagen on Thursday, November 13, 2014 - 04:28 pm:

Are the rivits for the ears a unique size for 9-10?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Hagen on Friday, November 21, 2014 - 05:02 pm:

Never got a response for this one. Is Larry Smith on vacation somewhere in the tropics?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, November 21, 2014 - 08:56 pm:

Sorry Gary, I don't know the answer. I am just looking back in to see if you found out?
Drive carefully, and enjoy. Me


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kim Dobbins on Friday, November 21, 2014 - 09:18 pm:

Gary, best way to find out is to drill one out and measure the hole, or you can grind off the head and drive the rivet out with a hammer and a punch. Larry is home.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Hagen on Friday, November 21, 2014 - 10:11 pm:

I called Larry at home, he was out probably having Model "T" fun.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Hagen on Sunday, November 23, 2014 - 03:57 pm:

Larry Smith says there is nothing unique for pan ear rivets for 9-10. He says they were the same for 9-27. I wonder how they were installed at the Ford plant?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John H. Nichols on Sunday, November 23, 2014 - 08:13 pm:

Never just off the head of a rivet and drive it out with a hammer and punch, unless you support the pan on the opposite surface. Support on the opposite side prevents bending of pan

US Army Airframe repair course, rule # 69

John


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John H. Nichols on Sunday, November 23, 2014 - 08:14 pm:

Never just drill off the head of a rivet and drive it out with a hammer and punch, unless you support the pan on the opposite surface. Support on the opposite side prevents bending of pan

US Army Airframe repair course, rule # 69

John


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, November 23, 2014 - 08:23 pm:

Gary

The 1914 pan (crank pan) or crankcase operations are well described in THE FORD SHOPS. Have listed just of few of the step by step operations. Note #62, the crankcase got a layer of black Japan on the outside!

From operation 13, the crank-box goes to the component appliers and brazers and grinders and turners and soft solderers, all listed as follows:
Operation 1. Apply drop-forging half-ring to rear end, drill three pin holes, put in pins.
Operation 2. Rivet pins both ends; John F. Allen, N. Y., pneumatic riveter.
Operation 3. Seat and drill front vertical wall for four rivets.
Operation 4. Burr up rivet ends to retain rivets.
Operation 5. Head front-wall rivets, by hand.
Operation 6. On anvil, hammer and “staking” front wall to fill.


Operation 10. In press, rivet ends of globe-bracket.
Operation 11. First braze; rear-end reinforce, made in a four-fire, hand-revolved brazing-furnace. See illustration above Ford Company design and construction.
Operation 12 Braze globe-seat bracket. Vertical flames both upward and downward. Ford construction, shown in the illustration, Fig. 18 .
Operation 13. On emery wheel, polish arm-seats.
Operation 14. Face end of rear annular collar flush with crank-box shell end.
Operation 15. Back to big press line, and in final die straighten up the job, far as completed.
Operation 16. Re-rivet front-wall rivets, stretched by preceding operation.
Operation 17. Bring walls to length with press surface-jig.
Operation 18. Grind fiat over walls at ends.
Operation 19. Pierce two holes for drain-cock flange; also, same operation, seat and close in the drain-cock seat ready for tapping.
Operation 20. Rivet splash-plate.
Operation 21. On driller, half-globe ream front-axle radius-ball seat.

Operation 42. Place the two pressed-steel hangers by which crank box is held to chassis frame, drill for and insert three pins, and rivet pin ends, to hold hangers to crank-box shell.
Operation 43. Braze crank-box hangers to crank-box shell, four fires in a bank, with swinging flames on top, stationary flames below. See upper illustration, Fig. 23.
Operation 44. By hand, with big file end, scrape and clean inside of crank-box shell.
Operation 45. By hand, finish-tap rear-collar screw holes.

Operation 61. Place crank-box, open side up, in gasoline vat and see if any gasoline leaks into the box at any point. If leak shows it is made tight.
Operation 62. Final. Dip in air-drying japan vat, to japan outside of crank-box.
The over-all dimensions of the completed crank-box are 42-7/8 inches long, 22-3/4 inches extreme width, over the hangers, 18-1/8 inches extreme width of shell, and 8-3/16 inches depth inside The weight of the finished crank-box assembly is 29 pounds




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