Dyke's Automobile Book

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Dyke's Automobile Book
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Shirley on Saturday, November 15, 2014 - 08:38 pm:

http://books.google.com/books?id=BtYbqYNbg0QC&pg=PA821&lpg=PA821&dq=model+t+ford +chassis+dimensions&source=bl&ots=wN_hB9g7ng&sig=_dnCDFPZbbrWVoauaXMJfo_Xzj0&hl= en&sa=X&ei=10BnVMm6No2vyAThmoC4CA&ved=0CDkQ6AEwBw#v=onepage&q=model%20t%20ford%2 0chassis%20dimensions&f=false I hope this works, it's a fun way to kill some time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garnet on Saturday, November 15, 2014 - 10:11 pm:

There are 3 Dykes Encyclopedia's which can be downloaded in full for free on https://archive.org/

They also have "Diseases of a Gasolene Automobile And How To Cure Them, 1903" to download.

Besides giga-poodles of books, there are old movies and TV commercials to watch and download too.

Garnet


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Saturday, November 15, 2014 - 10:58 pm:

dykes books are a wealth of information, and endless entertainment just looking thru all the photos and tech reading. many volumes from about 1910 thru 1940 or so(guessing) i have 3, every one should have at least one


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenny Edmondson, Indianapolis on Sunday, November 16, 2014 - 06:40 am:

Here's the direct link to the 3 books that Garnet referenced. I have a collection of the various Dyke's books and they are fun to read through.

https://archive.org/search.php?query=dyke%27s%20encyclopedia


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd on Sunday, November 16, 2014 - 11:47 am:

Clayton, one of the Dyke's manuals that I have is 1951. So they made them at least that long.
Anyone have later ones?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Colin Mavins on Monday, November 17, 2014 - 02:05 pm:

We have some Dykes books, one red one from 1912 the rest are blue from the teens and 20s.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Paddison (Vancouver Washington) on Monday, November 17, 2014 - 02:17 pm:

I feel the the contribution that Andrew Lee Dyke made to the early auto industry is the most unappreciated and most understated of them all.

A brief blog article I wrote on the subject awhile back:

"There are so many important recognizable names in the early American auto industry’s list of great pioneers. Names like Henry Ford, Alexander Winton, Ransom Eli Olds, David Dunbar Buick, Elwood P. Haynes, Rollin H. White, F.O. and F.E. Stanley, Fred and August Deusenberg and Henry Leyland. (Just to name a few!)

Yet there is one largely forgotten individual, despite making one of the most important contributions to the industry by the name of Andrew Lee Dyke. (Admit it, it wasn’t the first name that came to mind was it.)

What you may not know, is that Andrew Lee Dyke was an accomplished electrical engineer who saw huge potential as an after market parts supplier in the sprouting auto industry. While the previously mentioned names were focusing on new car design and production, Dyke busily established his business in 1899 which would supply the parts and accessories to maintain and support them. It was the first of its type in the country, and when he started out he didn’t even have product to sell to the customer base he was building. By 1901 however, Dyke made a deal with the St. Louis Motor Carriage Co. to sell a line of their parts and tools. The products were sold through his catalog business under the Dyke name. Also offered, were automobile kits which sold the parts, tools, blueprints and instructions to build your own economical car for less than $1,000.



More importantly though, it was in 1903 that Andrew Lee Dyke made perhaps his biggest contribution to the auto industry. Teaming up with friend and fellow auto producer George P. Dorris, they wrote Diseases of the Gasoline Engine and How to Cure Them. It became the very first automotive book published in America. He then continued on to build the Automotive literature market with Anatomy of the Automobile in 1906, and Dyke’s Automobile and Gasoline Engine Encyclopedia in 1910 which stayed in print well into the 1950’s.



Dyke’s Automobile and Gasoline Engine Encyclopedia books are probably his most important works and out of all the automotive books I own, these are my absolute favorite. I love how well thought out they are, not to mention rife with great information, diagrams, charts, descriptions, drawings and photos. An absolute must for any vintage car owner.

o remember guys and gals, every time you pick up either a Chilton or Haynes Manual, or even enjoy a book on vintage hot rods….we all have Andrew Lee Dykes to thank"


I own four editions of the Dykes Encyclopedia: a 1912 2nd Edition, 1918 12th Edition, a 1921 13th Edition and a 1926 14th Edition.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By arnie johansen on Monday, November 17, 2014 - 02:30 pm:

Has anyone looked at the one car garage plans that are in the book. If so how are the roof curved upper part of the rafters attached to the rafters that are attached to the top plate? It also states to notch the cross piece for the upper part of the rafter to fit into. I do not understand. It is on page 619 of one of the books.

Also it state 10 rafters, but that would only cover a length of 12 feet (if placed on 16" centers) not 18 feet if there is a one foot overhang at each end!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wilson, Saint John NB, Canada on Monday, November 17, 2014 - 02:38 pm:

I have 4 Dyke's books from 1920 to 1950. The 1950 version still has a complete section on the Model T Ford. The earliest copyright date in the books is 1911 so Colin, yours from 1912 must be one of the first. Does it say on the spine what edition number it is? My 1920 copy is the Eleventh Edition. The 1927 (Fifteenth Edition) that I have also has a separate Model A Car and AA Truck insert. Must be quite early because it shows the original integrated brake system without the separate emergency brake set-up. Great old books!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Paddison (Vancouver Washington) on Monday, November 17, 2014 - 02:44 pm:

Dave,

1912 is a 2nd Edition and it is not labeled on the spine, I don't believe they started doing that until 1914.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Paddison (Vancouver Washington) on Monday, November 17, 2014 - 02:46 pm:

Sorry, I have:

1912 2nd Edition
1921 12th Edition
1922 13th Edition
1926 14th Edition


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Monday, November 17, 2014 - 05:30 pm:

where else would one find instructions on how to build a tow truck out of a pierce arrow limo?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Paddison (Vancouver Washington) on Monday, November 17, 2014 - 05:36 pm:

lol! Very true Clayton, I love that chapter :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Colin Mavins on Monday, November 17, 2014 - 06:42 pm:

In the book case in the basement of Dads house we found a book called Troubles, remedies and repairs of the automobile and gas engine copy write 1909 written by Dykes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Monday, November 17, 2014 - 07:02 pm:

Clayton S:

For many years, there was a fantastic Pierce Arrow tow truck in Bloomington, MN.

It was built by George Sunde, father of former Minnesota Viking, Milt Sunde. He operated a blacksmith and machine shop on 98th and Lyndale - near Old Shakopee Road - starting in 1926. It was still operating when I was a kid.

George told my father that New Year's Eve was the best day of the year for his towing business.

I saw the tow truck when I was a teenager after it had been sold to a gas pump collector. It very unique - I wish I had photos of it. It was unrestored but in excellent condition because it had always been maintained when it was originally used and also kept in good storage. The crane in the back was powered by a Star automobile engine.

I don't know where the truck resides today.


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration