Fixing a "restoration"

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Fixing a "restoration"
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, November 26, 2014 - 09:10 pm:

As we all know, that term means many things to many people, and often covers a multitude of sins. The guys who did the 1923 touring I bought a few years ago did a decent job on some things, but apparently when it comes to fasteners they were clueless. So one of my ongoing projects is to replace some of their glaring errors in that department with something more appropriate for a Model T. Here's a little chore I did this week.







Eventually I may get around to the screws that don't show, but for now I'm dealing just with the ones that are out where they're easily seen.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Wednesday, November 26, 2014 - 09:32 pm:

Steve,
When your done with the newspaper will you please pass me the funnies.

Would you please post a picture of the car your working on. I follow your posts but don't remember seeing a photo of the entire car. You may have posted a picture of the whole car but I can't remember seeing it. (maybe it's an age thing...memory that is)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Wednesday, November 26, 2014 - 09:46 pm:

Thank you Steve, and Lizzie will thank you too. She was probably "ashamed" of those "ugly" phillips screws. :-) :-) One of my pet peeves is phillips head screws on an antique car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Wednesday, November 26, 2014 - 11:23 pm:

Steve - As you said, the term "Restoration" means many things to many people..."

Andy Mounce, ( R.I.P.), a well respected T collector from Kentucky, Once said "What's a restoration? He answered: That's what you do in the parking lot before the tour begins!" :-)

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, November 27, 2014 - 12:37 am:

Looks great, Steve. It is details like this that make all the difference in the world to me in terms of appeal,
whether it is that old pump handle, the proper looking valve, or screws, nuts, bolts, etc.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, November 27, 2014 - 12:40 am:

Dennis, here's the whole car:





And here is is moving: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21k8N9rR0GU&list=UUFVx528ORtpDgCPJXbFCA6w


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adrian Whiteman, New Zealand on Thursday, November 27, 2014 - 01:12 am:

"As you said, the term "Restoration" means many things to many people..." "

Well yes, that is certainly correct. I am working on a "well restored" 1915/1918/1924/1926 "ish" speedster.

Only one word for it - ARRGGGHH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, November 27, 2014 - 01:26 am:

Adrian W,
What does Albert have to say about that?
Another word for that "1915/1918/1924/1926 "ish" speedster" should be "FUN".

Steve J,
Working on the touring? Taking a break from the '15? Working on the Ts is all good.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2

(Message edited by wayne sheldon on November 27, 2014)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, November 27, 2014 - 01:51 am:

Roadster and/or touring when it's cold out, and roof project when the outdoors gets up near 40 F. Variety is the spice of life. :-)

Adrian, haven't seen you on the forum for awhile. When you have a moment, let's see that speedster.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Clipner-Los Angeles on Thursday, November 27, 2014 - 02:09 am:

I dunno Steve, I think the Cad.Plated Phillips screws and a little bling .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By eugene story on Thursday, November 27, 2014 - 02:46 am:

In the northern part of southern Missouri, we call those cad. plated screws with a square head, with the corners for a phillips, Robertson screw heads.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Kiefaber on Thursday, November 27, 2014 - 05:30 am:

Steve, damn good video!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Thursday, November 27, 2014 - 07:08 am:

Thank you for the photo of your car it looks very nice. The video is fantastic.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By harvey cash on Thursday, November 27, 2014 - 07:10 am:

Steve, Great video, I just love seeing and hearing a T run. Nice job. Harv.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Thursday, November 27, 2014 - 08:58 am:

My trim professor in college looked down his nose on my use of phillips head screws in the bed of my 1923 roadster pickup. Since Ford didn't actually build a pickup in 1923, I could get away with saying it was built by a farmer in the Depression. But that's the only place you can see phillips head screws. I made an attempt to make sure the visible fasteners were period correct. Some people just don't care, and that's what gives guys like me and Steve something to do.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Thursday, November 27, 2014 - 09:31 am:

Nice video Steve. Did you "lose" your rear seat passenger when the door came open about 0.40. :-) :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Thursday, November 27, 2014 - 12:19 pm:

What about use of hex sided nuts (other than Ford's castle nuts for cotter pins)? Also use of split lock washers? In building my Hack I am trying to use square nuts where ever I can. If not using split lock washers I use locktite.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Erfert on Thursday, November 27, 2014 - 03:51 pm:

Just a few about places that really recycled stuff, we have a store in Flagstaff, AZ called E.R.I.C. and it used to sell used building materials. It has been closed for 2 years but when open I could find nuts and bolts from those years long gone and always paid the price they asked. Don't know why they are closed but all the inventory is still there! Hope they will open again and not as a museum like many of the old "junk yards" have recently.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Thursday, November 27, 2014 - 04:04 pm:

Steve,I use the 'put-and-take' method when building wooden bodywork. Modern phillips head screws are used when building the framework and then when completed, the ones that will be seen are replaced with slotted head screws. That way my stocks of slotted head screws is wound down at a much slower rate.

The trouble is I keep finding the odd box of slotted heads in various places and my stocks are growing! Either I need to work faster, or pass up on some screws. Same thing with square nuts.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house on Friday, November 28, 2014 - 08:23 pm:

I enjoyed looking at the picture of your '23 touring Steve and I'd recommend our Forum friend Jack Daron as the restorer/supplier of top bows. . .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Friday, November 28, 2014 - 09:16 pm:

I have a set right now,ready to go.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, November 28, 2014 - 10:23 pm:

I'm up to my hips in top parts. All they need is new wood, paint, fasteners, etc. One of these days... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Saturday, November 29, 2014 - 05:41 pm:

Once I spent some time waiting for a load to be ready at an electric power company staging area. I noticed some small hardware strewn about in the dirt obviously not worth the company's time to recover. Being a bit of a scrounge I picked up a bunch of 5/16ths square nuts and carriage bolts that were heavily galvanized. Now that I am working on Ts they have been put to use.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adrian Whiteman, New Zealand on Monday, December 01, 2014 - 03:34 am:

Ha ha Wayne :-)
Albert happily does not have to share his garage! The "speedster" heads to his own home this weekend (whew).
Cheers,
Adrian


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Norton on Monday, December 01, 2014 - 06:10 am:

Robertson screws can be like this. http://www.robertsonscrew.com


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