Block crack Question

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Block crack Question
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By lorenzo leon on Friday, November 28, 2014 - 11:25 am:

Can I use this block with this crack ,?its in the web center bearing ,Looks like it was put down on a bolt or something
Thank you all ..Lorenzo


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Friday, November 28, 2014 - 11:36 am:

Looks like it is not in the critical load path. I would ignore it if it is the only crack that can be found with magnuflux. The block is only used to support 20 or so horsepower. If this were a part for a 777 airliner it would be worrisome.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By lorenzo leon on Friday, November 28, 2014 - 11:41 am:

thank you Royce ,just wanted to be sure and ask the pros..
Lorenzo


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Friday, November 28, 2014 - 05:50 pm:

I wouldn't worry about it either. Just be sure the chunk can't fall out and get into the engine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By lorenzo leon on Friday, November 28, 2014 - 07:22 pm:

I was thinking of soldering it but it does ring good not hollow, like if its loose ill see how I can secure it if not out it goes
well thank you all for the answer


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Saturday, November 29, 2014 - 09:14 am:

Finding and applying lost arts. Something to be considered for future engine repair is metal stitching. Watched a British "reality" program call Car SOS on the National Geographic Channel. One episode was the "oily rag" style renovation of a 1928 Austin 12. During the rebuild it was noted that the cylinder head had a leak. The solution was to have the head metal stitched rather than replace the damaged head.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By J and M Machine Co Inc on Saturday, November 29, 2014 - 07:20 pm:

George: We utilize metal stitching on all engines needing crack repair. it is a tried and true repair rather than the people who mention JB weld.
http://www.jandm-machine.com/metalStitching.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Saturday, November 29, 2014 - 07:50 pm:

J and M : Can you explain the "cross stitching" a little better.?? I have heard about and done a few stitches in cracks that were "closed" (did not run all the way to an edge) But I have never seen your "cross stitch" technique.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Menkhaus on Saturday, November 29, 2014 - 09:04 pm:

I have that same crack, but mine cracked all the way through,and the chunk was gone when I opened the engine, so I suspect it was gone for a very long time. (Hard to see in the photo, my camera that many years ago was really crappy). engine rebuilt 10 years ago with that chunk missing, still runs sweet today..

Missing Chunk in engine web


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By J and M Machine Co Inc on Saturday, November 29, 2014 - 09:05 pm:

The cross stitch that you're mentioning is for retaining the area that has been stressed due to the crack.
The cross portion or bridge keeps the metal together. Rather than just pinning the crack these bridges keep the area secure from ever opening up again.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Monday, December 01, 2014 - 09:42 am:

J and M, Can you show a good photo of the "cross stitch" or "bridge".? I can not see it well enough in the photo on the link to fully understand it. Is the main crack done in a "pinning" method and the "bridge cross stitch" the same way.?? I have done the "pinning" where I drill a small hole in the crack, and tap it for a brass bolt/screw. Then I insert the screw and cut it flush with the surface of the metal. Then I drill and tap another hole at the edge of the first hole, where 1/2 of the second hole is in the first screw and 1/2 is in the part being fixed. Then cut the second screw off and repeat till the crack is totally "pinned". But I just do not understand the "bridge" I understand how it is a "good thing to do" but not how to accomplish it. Thanks ...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Monday, December 01, 2014 - 02:16 pm:

Donnie: Look up Lock-Stitch on the web. That is what they make, the stuff to do stitching with. Great stuff!! Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By J and M Machine Co Inc on Monday, December 01, 2014 - 07:47 pm:

http://www.jandm-machine.com/images/metalStitch3.jpg

Here is an example of the bridges securing the plate we installed in the side of this block.
http://www.jandm-machine.com/metalStitching.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Tuesday, December 02, 2014 - 09:04 am:

Dan and J and M : Thanks for the info. I looked the process up on the web and a very nice looking system. I believe I will be using it soon. I have a couple good looking 26-27 engine blocks with outside water jacket cracks. Im going to try the process on them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Tuesday, December 02, 2014 - 09:21 am:

JB Weld is great when you have to have it fixed in a hurry. It's like liquid baling wire. Not saying it's better than cold stitching. Just saying it's nothing to look down your nose at in a pinch.

I've seen an article in Generator and Distributor (I know, bowties are taboo here, but this article is just good general information) about stitching a crack with all-thread. Basically you drill and tap a hole through the crack and screw the all-thread in the hole. Then you cut the all-thread flush with the part, then drill and tap another hole that overlaps the previous plug. Repeat until the crack has been filled with all-thread. Is this basically how it's done?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By J and M Machine Co Inc on Tuesday, December 02, 2014 - 09:39 am:



Last night I saw that Donnie inquired about bridges but I didn't have any pic's on home computer.
Here's a 1912 that was destroyed by the Model T god in our area. JB weld and vee'ing the block out for some reason actually made our job harder to repair.
Since vee'ing the block out weakened it severely just pinning the crack wouldn't keep this together so close to the two main bearings.
By going across the damaged area with the pins keeps it all together nicely.
http://www.jandm-machine.com/metalStitching.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Tuesday, December 02, 2014 - 11:58 am:

Donnie: I have fixed water jacket cracks with the Lock- Stitch method. After I ran a needle scaler across it, you could not tell it was ever cracked. Dan


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